OREMUS: 26 September 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Sep 25 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for September 26
Wilson Carlile, Founder of the Church Army, 1942

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Father,
through Jesus Christ, 
your beloved Son, our Lord, 
who fulfilled your will
and won for you a holy people; 
he stretched out his hands in suffering
in order to free from suffering
those who trust you. 
He freely accepted death
to break the bonds of the evil one, 
to crush hell underfoot, 
to give light to the righteous, 
to establish his covenant, 
and to show forth the resurrection. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you, O God, 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit: 
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 119:105-144

Your word is a lantern to my feet*
 and a light upon my path.
I have sworn and am determined*
 to keep your righteous judgements.
I am deeply troubled;*
 preserve my life, O Lord, according to your word.
Accept, O Lord, the willing tribute of my lips,*
 and teach me your judgements.
My life is always in my hand,*
 yet I do not forget your law.
The wicked have set a trap for me,*
 but I have not strayed from your commandments.
Your decrees are my inheritance for ever;*
 truly, they are the joy of my heart.
I have applied my heart to fulfil your statutes*
 for ever and to the end.

I hate those who have a divided heart,*
 but your law do I love.
You are my refuge and shield;*
 my hope is in your word.
Away from me, you wicked!*
 I will keep the commandments of my God.
Sustain me according to your promise, that I may live,*
 and let me not be disappointed in my hope.
Hold me up and I shall be safe,*
 and my delight shall be ever in your statutes.
You spurn all who stray from your statutes;*
 their deceitfulness is in vain.

In your sight all the wicked of the earth are but dross;*
 therefore I love your decrees.
My flesh trembles with dread of you;*
 I am afraid of your judgements.

I have done what is just and right;*
 do not deliver me to my oppressors.
Be surety for your servant's good;*
 let not the proud oppress me.
My eyes have failed from watching for your salvation*
 and for your righteous promise.
Deal with your servant
   according to your lovingkindness*
 and teach me your statutes.
I am your servant; grant me understanding,*
 that I may know your decrees.
It is time for you to act, O Lord,*
 for they have broken your law.
Truly, I love your commandments*
 more than gold and precious stones.
I hold all your commandments to be right for me;*
 all paths of falsehood I abhor.

Your decrees are wonderful;*
 therefore I obey them with all my heart.
When your word goes forth it gives light;*
 it gives understanding to the simple.
I open my mouth and pant;*
 I long for your commandments.

Turn to me in mercy,*
 as you always do to those who love your name.
Steady my footsteps in your word;*
 let no iniquity have dominion over me.
Rescue me from those who oppress me,*
 and I will keep your commandments.
Let your countenance shine upon your servant*
 and teach me your statutes.
My eyes shed streams of tears,*
 because people do not keep your law.

You are righteous, O Lord,*
 and upright are your judgements.
You have issued your decrees*
 with justice and in perfect faithfulness.
My indignation has consumed me,*
 because my enemies forget your words.
Your word has been tested to the uttermost,*
 and your servant holds it dear.
I am small and of little account,*
 yet I do not forget your commandments.
Your justice is an everlasting justice*
 and your law is the truth.
Trouble and distress have come upon me,*
 yet your commandments are my delight.
The righteousness of your decrees is everlasting;*
 grant me understanding, that I may live.

FIRST READING [Ecclus 38.24–end]:

The wisdom of the scribe depends on the opportunity of leisure;
   only the one who has little business can become wise. 
How can one become wise who handles the plough,
   and who glories in the shaft of a goad,
who drives oxen and is occupied with their work,
   and whose talk is about bulls? 
He sets his heart on ploughing furrows,
   and he is careful about fodder for the heifers. 
So it is with every artisan and master artisan
   who labours by night as well as by day;
those who cut the signets of seals,
   each is diligent in making a great variety;
they set their heart on painting a lifelike image,
   and they are careful to finish their work. 
So it is with the smith, sitting by the anvil,
   intent on his ironwork;
the breath of the fire melts his flesh,
   and he struggles with the heat of the furnace;
the sound of the hammer deafens his ears,
   and his eyes are on the pattern of the object.
He sets his heart on finishing his handiwork,
   and he is careful to complete its decoration. 
So it is with is the potter sitting at his work
   and turning the wheel with his feet;
he is always deeply concerned over his products,
   and he produces them in quantity. 
He moulds the clay with his arm
   and makes it pliable with his feet;
he sets his heart on finishing the glazing,
   and he takes care in firing the kiln. 

All these rely on their hands,
   and all are skilful in their own work. 
Without them no city can be inhabited,
   and wherever they live, they will not go hungry.
Yet they are not sought out for the council of the people, 
   nor do they attain eminence in the public assembly.
They do not sit in the judge’s seat,
   nor do they understand the decisions of the courts;
they cannot expound discipline or judgement,
   and they are not found among the rulers. 
But they maintain the fabric of the world,
   and their concern is for the exercise of their trade. 

How different the one who devotes himself
   to the study of the law of the Most High! 
 
HYMN 
Words: Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894)
Tune: Birling, Galilee, Gonfalon Royal, Maryton, Uffingham

Soldiers of Christ, arise,
And put your armour on,
Strong in the strength which God supplies
Through his eternal Son;
Strong in the Lord of hosts,
And in his mighty power,
Who in the strength of Jesus trusts
Is more than conqueror.

Stand then in his great might,
With all his strength endued;
But take, to arm you for the fight,
The panoply of God;
That, having all things done,
And all your conflicts passed,
Ye may o'ercome through Christ alone,
And stand entire at last. 

Leave no unguarded place,
No weakness of the soul;
Take every virtue, every grace,
And fortify the whole:
Indissolubly joined,
To battle all proceed;
But arm yourselves with all the mind
That was in Christ, your Head. 

>From strength to strength go on,
Wrestle, and fight, and pray,
Tread all the powers of darkness down,
And win the well-fought day;
Still let the Spirit cry
In all his soldiers: come!
Till Christ the Lord descend from high,
And take the conquerors home.

Pray, without ceasing pray,
Your captain gives the word;
His summons cheerfully obey,
And call upon the Lord:
To God your every want
In instant prayer display;
Pray always; pray, and never faint;
Pray, without ceasing pray! 

In fellowship, alone,
To God with faith draw near,
Approach his courts, besiege his throne
With all the powers of prayer:
Go to his temple, go,
Nor from his altar move;
Let every house his worship know,
And every heart his love. 

Pour out your souls to God,
And bow them with your knees,
And spread your hearts and hands abroad,
And pray for Zion's peace;
Your guides and brethren bear
For ever on your mind;
Extend the arms of mighty prayer,
Ingrasping all mankind.

SECOND READING [Mark 15.42–end]:

When evening had come, and since it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the sabbath, Joseph of Arimathea, a respected member of the council, who was also himself waiting expectantly for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then Pilate wondered if he were already dead; and summoning the centurion, he asked him whether he had been dead for some time. When he learned from the centurion that he was dead, he granted the body to Joseph. Then Joseph bought a linen cloth, and taking down the body, wrapped it in the linen cloth, and laid it in a tomb that had been hewn out of the rock. He then rolled a stone against the door of the tomb. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where the body was laid. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
>From the sin of unbelief, 
preserve us in hope. 

>From all neglect and defilement of body and spirit, 
uphold us in love.

>From all self-righteousness, 
deliver us with truth. 

>From neglect of our responsibilities, 
mold us with faithfulness. 

>From ingratitude and selfishness, 
secure us in grace.

>From anger, fear, and envy, 
grant us your peace. 

>From indifference to your meritorious life and death, 
transform us by your cross. 

Grant, O merciful God, 
that your people may have that mind 
that was in Christ Jesus, who emptied himself, 
and took the form of a servant, 
and in humility became obedient even to death. 
For you have highly exalted him 
and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 
Jesus Christ, the Lord; 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, in everlasting glory. Amen.

Almighty God,
by whose grace Wilson Carlile, kindled with the fire of your love,
became a burning and a shining light in the Church:
inflame us with the same spirit of discipline and love,
that we may ever walk before you as children of light;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Pour out your Spirit, O God, over all the world,
to inspire every heart with knowledge and love of you. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The intercession is by Robert Nickel. 
The closing prayer use phrases from a prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_ (c) Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Wilson Carlile was born in 1847 in Brixton. He suffered from a spinal
weakness all his life, which hampered his education. He entered his
grandfather's business at the age of thirteen but soon moved on and learned
French fluently, which he used to good advantage in France trading in silk. He
later learned German and Italian to enhance his business but was ruined in the
slump of 1873. After a serious illness, he began to treat his religion more
seriously and became confirmed in the Church of England. He acted as organist
to Ira D Sankey during the Moody and Sankey missions and, in 1881, was
ordained priest, serving his curacy at St Mary Abbots in Kensington, together
with a dozen other curates. The lack of contact between the Church and the
working classes was a cause of real concern to him and he began outdoor
preaching. In 1882, he resigned his curacy and founded the Church Army, four
years after the founding of the Salvation Army. Under his influence it thrived
and he continued to take part in its administration until a few weeks before his
death on this day in 1942. [Exciting Holiness]



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