OREMUS: 25 September 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Sep 24 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for September 25
Lancelot Andrewes, Bishop of Winchester, Spiritual Writer, 1626

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O Lord our God,
the God of our fathers and mothers,
who turns the shadow of death into the morning,
who lightens our eyes so that we do not slumber in death.
You let us hear your loving-kindness in the morning,
for we trust in you.
You teach us to do that which pleases you,
for you are our God.
Your loving Spirit leads us forth into the land of righteousness.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 119:33-40

Teach me, O Lord, the way of your statutes,*
 and I shall keep it to the end.

Give me understanding and I shall keep your law;*
 I shall keep it with all my heart.
Make me go in the path of your commandments,*
 for that is my desire.
Incline my heart to your decrees*
 and not to unjust gain.
Turn my eyes from watching what is worthless;*
 give me life in your ways.
Fulfil your promise to your servant,*
 which you make to those who fear you.
Turn away the reproach which I dread,*
 because your judgements are good.
Behold, I long for your commandments;*
 in your righteousness preserve my life.
Psalm 119:41-48

Let your lovingkindness come to me, O Lord,*
 and your salvation, according to your promise.
Then shall I have a word for those who taunt me,*
 because I trust in your words.
Do not take the word of truth out of my mouth,*
 for my hope is in your judgements.
I shall continue to keep your law;*
 I shall keep it for ever and ever.
I will walk at liberty,*
 because I study your commandments.
I will tell of your decrees before kings*
 and will not be ashamed.
I delight in your commandments,*
 which I have always loved.
I will lift up my hands to your commandments,*
 and I will meditate on your statutes.
Psalm 119:49-56

Remember your word to your servant,*
 because you have given me hope.
This is my comfort in my trouble,*
 that your promise gives me life.
The proud have derided me cruelly,*

 but I have not turned from your law.
When I remember your judgements of old,*
 O Lord, I take great comfort.
I am filled with a burning rage,*
 because of the wicked who forsake your law.
Your statutes have been like songs to me*
 wherever I have lived as a stranger.
I remember your name in the night, O Lord,*
 and dwell upon your law.
This is how it has been with me,*
 because I have kept your commandments.
Psalm 119:57-64

You only are my portion, O Lord;*
 I have promised to keep your words.
I entreat you with all my heart,*
 be merciful to me according to your promise.

I have considered my ways*
 and turned my feet towards your decrees.
I hasten and do not tarry*
 to keep your commandments.
Though the cords of the wicked entangle me,*
 I do not forget your law.
At midnight I will rise to give you thanks,*
 because of your righteous judgements.
I am a companion of all who fear you*
 and of those who keep your commandments.
The earth, O Lord, is full of your love;*
 instruct me in your statutes.
Psalm 119:65-72

O Lord, you have dealt graciously with your servant,*
 according to your word.
Teach me discernment and knowledge,*
 for I have believed in your commandments.
Before I was afflicted I went astray,*
 but now I keep your word.
You are good and you bring forth good;*
 instruct me in your statutes.
The proud have smeared me with lies,*
 but I will keep your commandments
   with my whole heart.
Their heart is gross and fat,*
 but my delight is in your law.
It is good for me that I have been afflicted,*
 that I might learn your statutes.
The law of your mouth is dearer to me*
 than thousands in gold and silver.

FIRST READING [Ecclus 38.1–14]:

Honour physicians for their services,
   for the Lord created them; 
for their gift of healing comes from the Most High,
   and they are rewarded by the king. 
The skill of physicians makes them distinguished,
   and in the presence of the great they are admired. 
The Lord created medicines out of the earth,
   and the sensible will not despise them. 
Was not water made sweet with a tree
   in order that its power might be known? 
And he gave skill to human beings
   that he might be glorified in his marvellous works. 
By them the physician heals and takes away pain; 
   the pharmacist makes a mixture from them.
God’s works will never be finished;
   and from him health spreads over all the earth. 

My child, when you are ill, do not delay,
   but pray to the Lord, and he will heal you. 
Give up your faults and direct your hands rightly,
   and cleanse your heart from all sin. 
Offer a sweet-smelling sacrifice, and a memorial portion of choice flour,
   and pour oil on your offering, as much as you can afford. 
Then give the physician his place, for the Lord created him;
   do not let him leave you, for you need him. 
There may come a time when recovery lies in the hands of physicians, 
   for they too pray to the Lord
that he will grant them success in diagnosis
   and in healing, for the sake of preserving life. 

HYMN 
Words: Charles Wesley (1707-1788)
Meter: 77 77 77

Centre of our hopes Thou art,
End of our enlarged desire,
Stamp Thine image on our heart,
Fill us now with heavenly fire;
Overflowed by love divine,
Seal our souls for ever Thine.

All our works in Thee be wrought,
Levelled at one common aim;
Every word and every thought,
Purge in the refining flame;
Lead us, through the paths of peace,
On to perfect holiness.

Let us all together rise,
To Thy glorious life restored,
Here regain our paradise,
Here prepare to meet our Lord,
Here enjoy the earnest given,
Travel hand in hand to Heaven.

SECOND READING [Mark 15.33–41]:

When it was noon, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon. At three o'clock Jesus cried out with a loud voice, 'Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?' which means, 'My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?' When some of the bystanders heard it, they said, 'Listen, he is calling for Elijah.' And someone ran, filled a sponge with sour wine, put it on a stick, and gave it to him to drink, saying, 'Wait, let us see whether Elijah will come to take him down.' Then Jesus gave a loud cry and breathed his last. And the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. Now when the centurion, who stood facing him, saw that in this way he breathed his last, he said, 'Truly this man was God's Son!' 

There were also women looking on from a distance; among them were Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome. These used to follow him and provided for him when he was in Galilee; and there were many other women who had come up with him to Jerusalem. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord,
Our God, the God of our Fathers;
Who turnest the shadow of death into the morning;
and lightenest the face of the earth;
Who separatest darkness from the face of the light ;
and banishest night and bringest back the day;
Who lightenest mine eyes,
that I sleep not in death;
Who deliverest me from the terror by night,
from the pestilence that walketh in darkness;
Who drivest sleep from mine eyes,
and slumber from mine eyelids;
Who makest the outgoings of the morning
and evening to praise Thee;
because I laid me down and slept and rose up again,
for the Lord sustained me; because I waked and beheld,
and my sleep was sweet unto me.
Blot out as a thick cloud my transgressions,
and as a cloud my sins;
grant me to be a child of light, a child of the day,
to walk soberly, holily, honestly, as in the day,
vouchsafe to keep me this day without sin.
Thou who upholdest the falling and liftest the fallen,
let me not harden my heart in provocation,
  or temptation or deceitfulness of any sin.
Moreover, deliver me to-day
from the snare of the hunter
and from the noisome pestilence;
from the arrow that flieth by day,
          from the sickness that destroyeth in the noon day.
Defend this day against my evil,
against the evil of this day defend Thou me.
Let not my days be .spent in vanity,
nor my years in sorrow.
One day teileth another,
and one night certifierh another.
0 let me hear Thy loving-kindness betimes
in the morning,
for in Thee is my trust;
shew Thou me the way that I should walk in,
for I lift up my soul unto Thee.
Deliver me, 0 Lord, from mine enemies,
for I flee unto Thee.
Teach me to do the thing that pleaseth Thee, for Thou art my God:
let Thy loving Spirit 1ead me forth into the land of righteousness.
Quicken me, 0 Lord, for Thy Name's sake,
and for Thy righteousness' sake bring my soul out of trouble:
remove from me foolish imaginations,
inspire those which are good and pleasing in Thy sight.
Turn awav mine eyes lest they behold vanitv :
let mine eyes look right on,
and let mine eyelids look straight before me.
Hedge up mine ears with thorns
lest they incline to undisciplined words.
Give me early the ear to hear,
and open mine ears to the instruction of Thy oracles.
Set a watch, 0 Lord, before my mouth,
and keep the door of my lips.
Let my word be seasoned with salt,
that it may minister grace to the hearers.
Let no deed be grief unto me nor offence of heart.
Let me do some work
for which Thou wilt remember me, Lord,
for good,
and spare me according to the greatness
of Thv mercy.
Into Thine hands I commend mv spirit, soul, and body,
which Thou hast created, redeemed,
regenerated,
O Lord, Thou God of truth:
and together with me
all mine and all that belongs to me.
Thou hast vouchsafed them to me,
Lord, in Thy goodness.
Guard us from all evil,
guard our souls,
I beseech Thee, 0 Lord.
Guard us without falling,
and place us immaculate
in the presence of Thy glory
in that day.
Guard my going out and my coming in
henceforth and for ever.
Prosper, I pray Thee, Thy servant this day, and grant him mercy
in the sight of those who meet him.
0 God, make speed to save me,
0 Lord, make haste to help me. 0 turn Thee then unto me,
and have mercy upon me;
give Thy strength unto Thy servant,
and help the son of Thine handmaid.
Show some token upon me for good,
that they who hate me may see it and be ashamed,
because Thou, Lord, hast holpen me
and comforted me. Amen.

Lord God,
who gave to Lancelot Andrewes many gifts of your Holy Spirit,
making him a man of prayer and a pastor of your people:
perfect in us that which is lacking in your gifts,
of faith, to increase it,
of hope, to establish it,
of love, to kindle it,
that we may live in the light of your grace and glory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Remember us, gracious God,
when we cannot see your way and purpose,
and renew in us the joy of your kingdom of light and life.
We ask this in the Name of Jesus Christ the Lord. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Let us find grace in your sight, O God,
that we may serve you acceptably with reverence and godly fear. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer, closing prayer, and commendation are by Lancelot Andrewes.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Born in 1555 in Barking, Lancelot Andrewes studied at Merchant Taylors' School and then Pembroke Hall, Cambridge. After ordination, he held several posts before accepting appointment as bishop, first of Chichester, then of Ely and finally of Winchester in 1619. Andrewes was present at the Hampton Court Conference in 1604, which furthered the reform of the Church of England, and he was also a translator of much of the Old Testament of what is known as the 'Authorised Version' of the Bible. His preaching and his writings proved highly influential and his holiness of life and gentle nature endeared him to all who met him. He died on this day in the year 1626 and his remains lie in a church which was then in his diocese of Winchester but now is the cathedral for the diocese of Southwark. [Exciting Holiness]


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