OREMUS: 4 September 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Sep 3 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for September 4

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God of a thousand faces,
for all who give you a face
by spreading your love in the world. 
For all who give you hands, 
by doing their best toward their sisters and brothers. 
For all who give you a mouth, 
by defending the weak and the oppressed. 
For all who give you eyes, 
by seeing every bit of love possible in you. 
For all who give you a heart, 
by preferring the poor to the rich, 
the weak to the strong. 
For all reveal you simply by what they are, 
because they reflect your beauty in their lives. 
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 19

The heavens declare the glory of God,*
 and the firmament shows his handiwork.
One day tells its tale to another,*
 and one night imparts knowledge to another.
Although they have no words or language,*
 and their voices are not heard,
Their sound has gone out into all lands,*
 and their message to the ends of the world.
In the deep has he set a pavilion for the sun;*
 it comes forth like a bridegroom out of his chamber;
   it rejoices like a champion to run its course.
It goes forth from the uttermost edge of the heavens
   and runs about to the end of it again;*
 nothing is hidden from its burning heat.
The law of the Lord is perfect
   and revives the soul;*
 the testimony of the Lord is sure
   and gives wisdom to the innocent.
The statutes of the Lord are just
   and rejoice the heart;*
 the commandment of the Lord is clear
   and gives light to the eyes.
The fear of the Lord is clean
   and endures for ever;*
 the judgements of the Lord are true
   and righteous altogether.
More to be desired are they than gold,
   more than much fine gold,*
 sweeter far than honey,
   than honey in the comb.
By them also is your servant enlightened,*
 and in keeping them there is great reward.
Who can tell how often he offends?*
 Cleanse me from my secret faults.
Above all, keep your servant from presumptuous sins;
   let them not get dominion over me;*
 then shall I be whole and sound,
   and innocent of a great offence.
Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart
   be acceptable in your sight,*
 O Lord, my strength and my redeemer.

Psalm 20

May the Lord answer you in the day of trouble,*
 the name of the God of Jacob defend you;
Send you help from his holy place*
 and strengthen you out of Zion;
Remember all your offerings*
 and accept your burnt sacrifice;
Grant you your heart's desire*
 and prosper all your plans.
We will shout for joy at your victory
   and triumph in the name of our God;*
 may the Lord grant all your requests.
Now I know that the Lord gives victory
   to his anointed;*
 he will answer him out of his holy heaven,
   with the victorious strength of his right hand.
Some put their trust in chariots and some in horses,*
 but we will call upon the name of the Lord our God.
They collapse and fall down,*
 but we will arise and stand upright.
O Lord, give victory to the king*
 and answer us when we call.

Psalm 21

The king rejoices in your strength, O Lord;*
 how greatly he exults in your victory!
You have given him his heart's desire;*
 you have not denied him the request of his lips.
For you meet him with blessings of prosperity,*
 and set a crown of fine gold upon his head.
He asked you for life and you gave it to him;*
 length of days, for ever and ever.
His honour is great, because of your victory;*
 splendour and majesty have you bestowed upon him.
For you will give him everlasting felicity*
 and will make him glad with the joy of your presence.
For the king puts his trust in the Lord;*
 because of the lovingkindness of the Most High,
   he will not fall.
Your hand will lay hold upon all your enemies;*
 your right hand will seize all those who hate you.
You will make them like a fiery furnace*
 at the time of your appearing, O Lord;
You will swallow them up in your wrath,*
 and fire shall consume them.
You will destroy their offspring from the land*
 and their descendants
   from among the peoples of the earth.
Though they intend evil against you
   and devise wicked schemes,*
 yet they shall not prevail.
For you will put them to flight*
 and aim your arrows at them.
Be exalted, O Lord, in your might;*
 we will sing and praise your power.

FIRST READING [Ecclus 7.27–end]:

With all your heart honour your father,
   and do not forget the birth pangs of your mother. 
Remember that it was of your parents you were born;
   how can you repay what they have given to you? 

With all your soul fear the Lord,
   and revere his priests. 
With all your might love your Maker,
   and do not neglect his ministers. 
Fear the Lord and honour the priest,
   and give him his portion, as you have been commanded:
the first fruits, the guilt-offering, the gift of the shoulders,
   the sacrifice of sanctification, and the first fruits of the holy things. 

Stretch out your hand to the poor,
   so that your blessing may be complete. 
Give graciously to all the living;
   do not withhold kindness even from the dead. 
Do not avoid those who weep,
   but mourn with those who mourn. 
Do not hesitate to visit the sick,
   because for such deeds you will be loved. 
In all you do, remember the end of your life,
   and then you will never sin. 
 
HYMN 
Words: Eliza S Alderson (1818-1889)
Tune: Donne Secours, Strength and Stay

And now, beloved Lord, thy soul resigning
Into thy Father's arms with conscious will,
Calmly, with reverend grace, thy head inclining,
The throbbing brow and labouring breast grow still.

Freely thy life thou yieldest, meekly bending
E'en to the last beneath our sorrows' load,
Yet, strong in death, in perfect peace commending
Thy spirit to thy Father and thy God.

Sweet Saviour, in mine hour of mortal anguish,
When earth grows dim, and round me falls the night,
O breathe thy peace, as flesh and spirit languish;
At that dread eventide let there be light.

To thy dear Cross turn thou mine eyes in dying;
Lay but my fainting head upon thy breast;
Those outstretched arms receive my latest sighing-
And then, O then, thine everlasting rest.

SECOND READING [Mark 11.12–26]:

On the following day, when they came from Bethany, Jesus was hungry. Seeing in the distance a fig tree in leaf, he went to see whether perhaps he would find anything on it. When he came to it, he found nothing but leaves, for it was not the season for figs. He said to it, 'May no one ever eat fruit from you again.' And his disciples heard it. 

Then they came to Jerusalem. And he entered the temple and began to drive out those who were selling and those who were buying in the temple, and he overturned the tables of the money-changers and the seats of those who sold doves; and he would not allow anyone to carry anything through the temple. He was teaching and saying, 'Is it not written, "My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations"? But you have made it a den of robbers.' And when the chief priests and the scribes heard it, they kept looking for a way to kill him; for they were afraid of him, because the whole crowd was spellbound by his teaching. And when evening came, Jesus and his disciples went out of the city. 

In the morning as they passed by, they saw the fig tree withered away to its roots. Then Peter remembered and said to him, 'Rabbi, look! The fig tree that you cursed has withered.' Jesus answered them, 'Have faith in God. Truly I tell you, if you say to this mountain, “Be taken up and thrown into the sea”, and if you do not doubt in your heart, but believe that what you say will come to pass, it will be done for you. So I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. 

'Whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone; so that your Father in heaven may also forgive you your trespasses.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
In your glory, Lord, protect us by the power of your name:
that we may be one as you are one.

We are in the world but not of it:
protect us from the evil one.

Give us your word and the full measure of your joy:
sanctify us by your truth.

May your Spirit unite us in the love and glory of Father and Son;
may we be one that the world may believe.

As you sent your Son into the world:
so send us, to make your glory known.

O God,
you resist those who are proud
and give grace to those who are humble.
Give us the humility of your Son,
that we may embody the generosity
of Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Claim our hearts, fill our minds, uplift our souls,
and reinforce our strength, that we may love you perfectly. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is by Lucien Deiss. The collect is from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The closing sentence is adapted from a prayer by William Howard Frere.



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