OREMUS: 3 September 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Sep 2 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for September 3
Gregory the Great, Bishop of Rome, Teacher of the Faith, 604

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, eternal and loving God!
Blessed is your Son Jesus Christ, 
to whom all authority 
in heaven and on earth has been given; 
who calls us to go and make disciples of all nations, 
and teach them to obey everything you command. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you, 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit: 
Blessed be God forever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 15

Lord, who may dwell in your tabernacle?*
 who may abide upon your holy hill?
Whoever leads a blameless life and does what is right,*
 who speaks the truth from his heart.
There is no guile upon his tongue;
   he does no evil to his friend;*
 he does not heap contempt upon his neighbour.
In his sight the wicked is rejected,*
 but he honours those who fear the Lord.
He has sworn to do no wrong*
 and does not take back his word.
He does not give his money in hope of gain,*
 nor does he take a bribe against the innocent.
Whoever does these things*
 shall never be overthrown.

Psalm 16

Protect me, O God, for I take refuge in you;*
 I have said to the Lord, 'You are my Lord,
   my good above all other.'
All my delight is upon the godly that are in the land,*
 upon those who are noble among the people.
But those who run after other gods*
 shall have their troubles multiplied.
Their libations of blood I will not offer,*
 nor take the names of their gods upon my lips.
O Lord, you are my portion and my cup;*
 it is you who uphold my lot.
My boundaries enclose a pleasant land;*
 indeed, I have a goodly heritage.
I will bless the Lord who gives me counsel;*
 my heart teaches me, night after night.
I have set the Lord always before me;*
 because he is at my right hand I shall not fall.
My heart, therefore, is glad and my spirit rejoices;*
 my body also shall rest in hope.
For you will not abandon me to the grave,*
 nor let your holy one see the Pit.
You will show me the path of life;*
 in your presence there is fullness of joy,
   and in your right hand are pleasures for evermore.

Psalm 17

Hear my plea of innocence, O Lord;
   give heed to my cry;*
 listen to my prayer,
   which does not come from lying lips.
Let my vindication come forth from your presence;*
 let your eyes be fixed on justice.
Weigh my heart, summon me by night,*
 melt me down; you will find no impurity in me.
I give no offence with my mouth as others do;*
 I have heeded the words of your lips.
My footsteps hold fast to the ways of your law;*
 in your paths my feet shall not stumble.
I call upon you, O God, for you will answer me;*
 incline your ear to me and hear my words.
Show me your marvellous lovingkindness,*
 O Saviour of those who take refuge at your right hand
   from those who rise up against them.
Keep me as the apple of your eye;*
 hide me under the shadow of your wings,
>From the wicked who assault me,*
 from my deadly enemies who surround me.
They have closed their heart to pity,*
 and their mouth speaks proud things.
They press me hard,
   now they surround me,*
 watching how they may cast me to the ground,
Like a lion, greedy for its prey,*
 and like a young lion lurking in secret places.
Arise, O Lord; confront them and bring them down;*
 deliver me from the wicked by your sword.
Deliver me, O Lord, by your hand*
 from those whose portion in life is this world;
Whose bellies you fill with your treasure,*
 who are well supplied with children
   and leave their wealth to their little ones.
But at my vindication I shall see your face;*
 when I awake, I shall be satisfied,
   beholding your likeness.

FIRST READING [Ecclus 6.14–end]:

Faithful friends are a sturdy shelter:
   whoever finds one has found a treasure. 
Faithful friends are beyond price;
   no amount can balance their worth. 
Faithful friends are life-saving medicine;
   and those who fear the Lord will find them. 
Those who fear the Lord direct their friendship aright,
   for as they are, so are their neighbours also. 

My child, from your youth choose discipline,
   and when you have grey hair you will still find wisdom. 
Come to her like one who ploughs and sows,
   and wait for her good harvest.
For when you cultivate her you will toil but little,
   and soon you will eat of her produce. 
She seems very harsh to the undisciplined;
   fools cannot remain with her. 
She will be like a heavy stone to test them,
   and they will not delay in casting her aside. 
For wisdom is like her name;
   she is not readily perceived by many. 

Listen, my child, and accept my judgement;
   do not reject my counsel. 
Put your feet into her fetters,
   and your neck into her collar. 
Bend your shoulders and carry her,
   and do not fret under her bonds. 
Come to her with all your soul,
   and keep her ways with all your might. 
Search out and seek, and she will become known to you;
   and when you get hold of her, do not let her go. 
For at last you will find the rest she gives,
   and she will be changed into joy for you. 
Then her fetters will become for you a strong defence,
   and her collar a glorious robe. 
Her yoke is a golden ornament,
   and her bonds a purple cord. 
You will wear her like a glorious robe,
   and put her on like a splendid crown. 

If you are willing, my child, you can be disciplined,
   and if you apply yourself you will become clever. 
If you love to listen you will gain knowledge,
   and if you pay attention you will become wise. 
Stand in the company of the elders.
   Who is wise? Attach yourself to such a one. 
Be ready to listen to every godly discourse,
   and let no wise proverbs escape you. 
If you see an intelligent person, rise early to visit him;
   let your foot wear out his doorstep. 
Reflect on the statutes of the Lord,
   and meditate at all times on his commandments.
It is he who will give insight to your mind,
   and your desire for wisdom will be granted. 

HYMN 
Words: sometimes attributed to Gregory the Great (545-604) translated John D Chambers (1805-1893)
Tune: Deus tuorum militum, Illsley

Maker of man, who from thy throne
Dost order all things, God alone;
By whose decree the teeming earth
To reptile and to beast gave birth:

The mighty forms that fill the land,
Instinct with life at thy command,
Are given subdued to humankind
For service in their rank assigned.

>From all thy servants drive away
Whate'er of thought impure today
Hath been with open action blent,
Or mingled with the heart's intent,

In heaven thine endless joys bestow,
And grant thy gifts of grace below;
>From chains of strife our souls release,
Bind fast the gentle bands of peace.

O Father, that we ask be done,
Through Jesus Christ, thine only Son;
Who, with the Holy Ghost and thee,
Doth live and reign eternally.

SECOND READING [Mark 11.1–11]:

When they were approaching Jerusalem, at Bethphage and Bethany, near the Mount of Olives, he sent two of his disciples and said to them, 'Go into the village ahead of you, and immediately as you enter it, you will find tied there a colt that has never been ridden; untie it and bring it. If anyone says to you, “Why are you doing this?” just say this, “The Lord needs it and will send it back here immediately.” ' They went away and found a colt tied near a door, outside in the street. As they were untying it, some of the bystanders said to them, 'What are you doing, untying the colt?' They told them what Jesus had said; and they allowed them to take it. Then they brought the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks on it; and he sat on it. Many people spread their cloaks on the road, and others spread leafy branches that they had cut in the fields. Then those who went ahead and those who followed were shouting,
'Hosanna!
   Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord! 
   Blessed is the coming kingdom of our ancestor David!
Hosanna in the highest heaven!' 

Then he entered Jerusalem and went into the temple; and when he had looked around at everything, as it was already late, he went out to Bethany with the twelve. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We pray for the coming of God's kingdom, saying,
Father, by your Spirit:
bring in your kingdom.

You came in Jesus to bring good news to the poor, 
sight to the blind, freedom to the captives, 
and salvation to your people:
anoint us with your Spirit; 
rouse us to work in his name.
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to bring help to the poor 
and freedom to the oppressed:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to tell the world 
the good news of your healing love:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to those who mourn,
to bring joy and gladness instead of grief:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to proclaim that the time is here
for you to save your people:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Gentle God,
the proof of love is in the works.
Where love exists, it works great things.
But when it ceases to act, it ceases to exist.
Those who love their friends in God
and their enemies for God's sake
possess true love as shown by Christ Jesus our Lord. Amen.
		
Merciful Father,
who chose your bishop Gregory
to be a servant of the servants of God:
grant that, like him, we may ever long to serve you
by proclaiming your gospel to the nations,
and may ever rejoice to sing your praises;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.      
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Be not anxious about what you have, but about what you are. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is Matthew 28:18-20. The collect and closing sentence are adapted from quotations by Gregory the Great. 

Gregory was born in 540, the son of a Roman senator. As a young man he pursued a governmental career, and in 573 was made Prefect of the city of Rome. Following the death of his father, he resigned his office, sold his inheritance, and became a monk. In 579 he was sent by the Pope to Constantinople to be his representative to the Patriarch. He returned to Rome in 586, and was himself elected Pope in 590. At a time of political turmoil, Gregory proved an astute administrator and diplomat, securing peace with the Lombards. He initiated the mission to England, sending Augustine and forty monks from his own monastery to refound the English Church. His writings were pastorally oriented. His spirituality was animated by a dynamic of love and desire for God. Indeed, he is sometimes called the 'Doctor of desire'. For Gregory, desire was a metaphor for the journey into God. As Pope, he styled himself 'Servant of the servants of God' -- a title which typified both his personality and ministry. He died in 604.



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