OREMUS: 9 October 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Oct 8 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for October 9
Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, Philosopher, Scientist, 1253

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you,  O God,
the Truth near to all who call upon you in truth;
and whom to know is perfect knowledge.
You instruct us with your divine wisdom,
and teach us your law,
that we may know the truth and walk in it.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 47

Clap your hands, all you peoples;*
 shout to God with a cry of joy.
For the Lord Most High is to be feared;*
 he is the great king over all the earth.
He subdues the peoples under us,*
 and the nations under our feet.
He chooses our inheritance for us,*
 the pride of Jacob whom he loves.
God has gone up with a shout,*
 the Lord with the sound of the ram'shorn.
Sing praises to God, sing praises;*
 sing praises to our king, sing praises.
For God is king of all the earth;*
 sing praises with all your skill.
God reigns over the nations;*
 God sits upon his holy throne.
The nobles of the peoples have gathered together*
 with the people of the God of Abraham.
The rulers of the earth belong to God,*
 and he is highly exalted.

Psalm 48

Great is the Lord and highly to be praised;*
 in the city of our God is his holy hill.
Beautiful and lofty, the joy of all the earth,
   is the hill of Zion,*
 the very centre of the world
   and the city of the great king.
God is in her citadels;*
 he is known to be her sure refuge.
Behold, the kings of the earth assembled*
 and marched forward together.
They looked and were astounded;*
 they retreated and fled in terror.
Trembling seized them there;*
 they writhed like a woman in childbirth,
   like ships of the sea when the east wind shatters them.
As we have heard, so have we seen,
   in the city of the Lord of hosts, in the city of our God;*
 God has established her for ever.
We have waited in silence
   on your lovingkindness, O God,*
 in the midst of your temple.
Your praise, like your name, O God,
   reaches to the world's end;*
 your right hand is full of justice.
Let Mount Zion be glad
   and the cities of Judah rejoice,*
 because of your judgements.
Make the circuit of Zion; walk round about her;*
 count the number of her towers.
Consider well her bulwarks; examine her strongholds;*
 that you may tell those who come after.
This God is our God for ever and ever;*
 he shall be our guide for evermore.

Psalm 49

Hear this, all you peoples;
   hearken, all you who dwell in the world,*
 you of high degree and low, rich and poor together.
My mouth shall speak of wisdom,*
 and my heart shall meditate on understanding.
I will incline my ear to a proverb*
 and set forth my riddle upon the harp.
Why should I be afraid in evil days,*
 when the wickedness of those at my heels surrounds me,
The wickedness of those
   who put their trust in their goods,*
 and boast of their great riches?
We can never ransom ourselves,*
 or deliver to God the price of our life;
For the ransom of our life is so great,*
 that we should never have enough to pay it,
In order to live for ever and ever,*
 and never see the grave.
For we see that the wise die also;
   like the dull and stupid they perish*
 and leave their wealth to those who come after them.
Their graves shall be their homes for ever,
   their dwelling places from generation to generation,*
 though they call the lands after their own names.
Even though honoured, they cannot live for ever;*
 they are like the beasts that perish.
Such is the way of those
   who foolishly trust in themselves,*
 and the end of those who delight in their own words.
Like a flock of sheep they are destined to die;
   Death is their shepherd;*
 they go down straightway to the grave.
Their form shall waste away,*
 and the land of the dead shall be their home.
But God will ransom my life;*
 he will snatch me from the grasp of death.
Do not be envious when some become rich,*
 or when the grandeur of their house increases;
For they will carry nothing away at their death,*
 nor will their grandeur follow them.
Though they thought highly of themselves
   while they lived,*
 and were praised for their success,
They shall join the company of their forebears,*
 who will never see the light again.
Those who are honoured, but have no understanding,*
 are like the beasts that perish.

FIRST READING [Ezekiel 2.3–3.11]:

The voice said to me, Mortal, I am sending you to the people of Israel, to a nation of rebels who have rebelled against me; they and their ancestors have transgressed against me to this very day. The descendants are impudent and stubborn. I am sending you to them, and you shall say to them, 'Thus says the Lord God.' Whether they hear or refuse to hear (for they are a rebellious house), they shall know that there has been a prophet among them. And you, O mortal, do not be afraid of them, and do not be afraid of their words, though briers and thorns surround you and you live among scorpions; do not be afraid of their words, and do not be dismayed at their looks, for they are a rebellious house. You shall speak my words to them, whether they hear or refuse to hear; for they are a rebellious house. 

But you, mortal, hear what I say to you; do not be rebellious like that rebellious house; open your mouth and eat what I give you. I looked, and a hand was stretched out to me, and a written scroll was in it. He spread it before me; it had writing on the front and on the back, and written on it were words of lamentation and mourning and woe. 
He said to me, O mortal, eat what is offered to you; eat this scroll, and go, speak to the house of Israel. So I opened my mouth, and he gave me the scroll to eat. He said to me, Mortal, eat this scroll that I give you and fill your stomach with it. Then I ate it; and in my mouth it was as sweet as honey. 

He said to me: Mortal, go to the house of Israel and speak my very words to them. For you are not sent to a people of obscure speech and difficult language, but to the house of Israel— not to many peoples of obscure speech and difficult language, whose words you cannot understand. Surely, if I sent you to them, they would listen to you. But the house of Israel will not listen to you, for they are not willing to listen to me; because all the house of Israel have a hard forehead and a stubborn heart. See, I have made your face hard against their faces, and your forehead hard against their foreheads. Like the hardest stone, harder than flint, I have made your forehead; do not fear them or be dismayed at their looks, for they are a rebellious house. He said to me: Mortal, all my words that I shall speak to you receive in your heart and hear with your ears; then go to the exiles, to your people, and speak to them. Say to them, 'Thus says the Lord God'; whether they hear or refuse to hear. 

HYMN 
Words: Edward Hayes Plumptre (1821-1891)
Tune: Neumark, O Waly Waly

O Lord of hosts, all heaven possessing,
Behold us from thy sapphire throne:
In doubt and darkness dimly guessing,
We might thy glory half have known;
But thou in Christ hast made us thine,
And on us all thy beauties shine.

Illumine all, disciples, teachers,
Thy law's deep wonders to unfold;
With reverent hand let wisdom's preachers
Bring forth their treasures, new and old;
Let oldest, youngest, find in thee
Of truth and love the boundless sea.

Let faith still light the lamp of science,
And knowledge pass from truth to truth,
And wisdom, in its full reliance,
Renew the primal awe of youth:
So holier, wiser, may we grow,
As time's swift currents onward flow.

Bind thou our life in fullest union
With all thy saints from sin set free;
Uphold us in that blest communion
Of all thy saints on earth with thee;
Keep thou our souls, or there, or here,
In mightiest love, that casts out fear.

SECOND READING [2 Thessalonians 3:6-end]:

Jesus said, 'I have said these things to you to keep you from stumbling. They will put you out of the synagogues. Indeed, an hour is coming when those who kill you will think that by doing so they are offering worship to God. And they will do this because they have not known the Father or me. But I have said these things to you so that when their hour comes you may remember that I told you about them.

'I did not say these things to you from the beginning, because I was with you. But now I am going to him who sent me; yet none of you asks me, “Where are you going?” But because I have said these things to you, sorrow has filled your hearts. Nevertheless, I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Advocate will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you. And when he comes, he will prove the world wrong about sin and righteousness and judgement: about sin, because they do not believe in me; about righteousness, because I am going to the Father and you will see me no longer; about judgement, because the ruler of this world has been condemned. 

'I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own, but will speak whatever he hears, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, because he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine. For this reason I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.'

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray to God for the coming of the Kingdom:

O God, into the pain of the tortured:
breathe stillness.

Into the hunger of those deprived:
breathe fullness.

Into those who have died in you:
breathe life.

Into those who long for you:
breathe your presence.

Your kingdom come, your will be done:
For the kingdom, the power and the glory
are yours, now and for ever. Amen.

Benevolent, merciful God:
When we are empty, fill us.
When we are weak in faith, strengthen us.
When we are cold in love, warm us,
that with fervor we may love our neighbors
and serve them for the sake of your Son,
Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.
		
God our ruler and guide,
your servant Robert Grosseteste
was a faithful pastor and teacher of your church; 
may we in your light see light
and in your will find our peace, 
that we may grow up together in Christ, 
to the glory of your holy name. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May we speak the truth in love,
and must grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is by Saint Augustine. The collect is from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

The second collect is from _For All the Saints, Anglican Church of New Zealand.

Robert Grosseteste (meaning 'large-head') was born at Stradbroke in Suffolk in about 1175. He studied at Oxford and Paris and held various posts until, after a grave illness, he returned to Oxford, where he taught at the Franciscan house of studies. He became Bishop of Lincoln in 1235, then the largest English diocese, which received from him a thorough visitation soon after his arrival. He met opposition in his attempts at vigorous reforms in the shape of his dean and chapter in the cathedral at Lincoln, who saw themselves as beyond his jurisdiction. The affair was settled in 1245 when the pope issued a bull giving the bishop full power over the Chapter. Robert attended the Council of Lyons that year and also travelled to Rome a few years later. His wide-ranging interests covered mathematics, optics and many of the sciences; he translated large numbers of theological works from Greek and wrote his own theological commentaries and philosophical works. He died on this day in the year 1253. [Exciting Holiness]


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