OREMUS: 16 November 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Nov 15 17:00:01 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for November 16
Margaret, Queen of Scotland, Philanthropist, Reformer of the Church, 1093

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Glory to you, O Champion of all Loves,
who for our sake endured the cross,
encountered the enemy and tasted death.
Glory be to you, O King of all Kings,
who for our salvation
wrestled with principalities and powers,
subdued the forces of hell
and won the greatest of all victories.
To you be all praise, all glory, and all love:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 79

O God, the heathen have come into your inheritance;
   they have profaned your holy temple;*
 they have made Jerusalem a heap of rubble.
They have given the bodies of your servants
   as food for the birds of the air,*
 and the flesh of your faithful ones
   to the beasts of the field.
They have shed their blood like water
   on every side of Jerusalem,*
 and there was no one to bury them.
We have become a reproach to our neighbours,*
 an object of scorn and derision to those around us.
How long will you be angry, O Lord?*
 will your fury blaze like fire for ever?
Pour out your wrath upon the heathen
   who have not known you*
 and upon the kingdoms
   that have not called upon your name.
For they have devoured Jacob*
 and made his dwelling a ruin.
Remember not our past sins;
   let your compassion be swift to meet us;*
 for we have been brought very low.
Help us, O God our Saviour, for the glory of your name;*
 deliver us and forgive us our sins, for your name's sake.     [
Why should the heathen say, 'Where is their God?'*
 Let it be known among the heathen and in our sight
   that you avenge the shedding
   of your servants' blood.]
Let the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners
   come before you,*
 and by your great might
   spare those who are condemned to die.     [
May the revilings with which
   they reviled you, O Lord,*
 return sevenfold into their bosoms.]
We are your people and the sheep of your pasture;*
 we will give you thanks for ever
   and show forth your praise from age to age.

Psalm 80

Hear, O Shepherd of Israel, leading Joseph like a flock;*
 shine forth, you that are enthroned upon the cherubim.
In the presence of Ephraim, Benjamin and Manasseh,*
 stir up your strength and come to help us.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
O Lord God of hosts,*
 how long will you be angered
   despite the prayers of your people?
You have fed them with the bread of tears;*
 you have given them bowls of tears to drink.
You have made us the derision of our neighbours,*
 and our enemies laugh us to scorn.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
You have brought a vine out of Egypt;*
 you cast out the nations and planted it.
You prepared the ground for it;*
 it took root and filled the land.
The mountains were covered by its shadow*
 and the towering cedar trees by its boughs.
You stretched out its tendrils to the Sea*
 and its branches to the River.
Why have you broken down its wall,*
 so that all who pass by pluck off its grapes?
The wild boar of the forest has ravaged it,*
 and the beasts of the field have grazed upon it.
Turn now, O God of hosts, look down from heaven;
   behold and tend this vine;*
 preserve what your right hand has planted.
They burn it with fire like rubbish;*
 at the rebuke of your countenance let them perish.
Let your hand be upon the man of your right hand,*
 the son of man you have made so strong for yourself.
And so will we never turn away from you;*
 give us life, that we may call upon your name.
Restore us, O Lord God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.

Psalm 81

Sing with joy to God our strength*
 and raise a loud shout to the God of Jacob.
Raise a song and sound the timbrel,*
 the merry harp and the lyre.
Blow the ram'shorn at the new moon,*
 and at the full moon, the day of our feast.
For this is a statute for Israel,*
 a law of the God of Jacob.
He laid it as a solemn charge upon Joseph,*
 when he came out of the land of Egypt.
I heard an unfamiliar voice saying,*
 'I eased his shoulder from the burden;
   his hands were set free from bearing the load.'
You called on me in trouble and I saved you;*
 I answered you from the secret place of thunder
   and tested you at the waters of Meribah.
Hear, O my people, and I will admonish you:*
 O Israel, if you would but listen to me!
There shall be no strange god among you;*
 you shall not worship a foreign god.
I am the Lord your God,
   who brought you out of the land of Egypt and said,*
 'Open your mouth wide and I will fill it.'
And yet my people did not hear my voice,*
 and Israel would not obey me.
So I gave them over to the stubbornness
   of their hearts,*
 to follow their own devices.
O that my people would listen to me!*
 that Israel would walk in my ways!
I should soon subdue their enemies*
 and turn my hand against their foes.
Those who hate the Lord would cringe before him,*
 and their punishment would last for ever.
But Israel would I feed with the finest wheat*
 and satisfy him with honey from the rock.

FIRST READING [Isaiah 7.1–17]:

In the days of Ahaz son of Jotham son of Uzziah, king of Judah, King Rezin of Aram and King Pekah son of Remaliah of Israel went up to attack Jerusalem, but could not mount an attack against it. When the house of David heard that Aram had allied itself with Ephraim, the heart of Ahaz and the heart of his people shook as the trees of the forest shake before the wind. 

Then the Lord said to Isaiah, Go out to meet Ahaz, you and your son Shear-jashub, at the end of the conduit of the upper pool on the highway to the Fuller's Field, and say to him, Take heed, be quiet, do not fear, and do not let your heart be faint because of these two smouldering stumps of firebrands, because of the fierce anger of Rezin and Aram and the son of Remaliah. Because Aram—with Ephraim and the son of Remaliah—has plotted evil against you, saying, Let us go up against Judah and cut off Jerusalem and conquer it for ourselves and make the son of Tabeel king in it; therefore thus says the Lord God:
It shall not stand,
   and it shall not come to pass. 
For the head of Aram is Damascus,
   and the head of Damascus is Rezin.
(Within sixty-five years Ephraim will be shattered, no longer a people.) 
The head of Ephraim is Samaria,
   and the head of Samaria is the son of Remaliah.
If you do not stand firm in faith,
   you shall not stand at all. 

Again the Lord spoke to Ahaz, saying, Ask a sign of the Lord your God; let it be deep as Sheol or high as heaven. But Ahaz said, I will not ask, and I will not put the Lord to the test. Then Isaiah said: 'Hear then, O house of David! Is it too little for you to weary mortals, that you weary my God also? Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Look, the young woman is with child and shall bear a son, and shall name him Immanuel. He shall eat curds and honey by the time he knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good. For before the child knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good, the land before whose two kings you are in dread will be deserted. The Lord will bring on you and on your people and on your ancestral house such days as have not come since the day that Ephraim departed from Judah—the king of Assyria.' 

HYMN 
Words: Anonymous
Tune: Orientis partibus

Dare to think, though others frown;
Dare in words your thoughts express;
Dare to rise, though oft cast down;
Dare the wronged and scorned to bless.

Dare from custom to depart;
Dare the priceless pearl possess;
Dare to wear it in your heart;
Dare, when others curse, to bless.

Dare what conscience says is right;
Do what reason says is best;
Do with all your mind and might;
Do your duty and be blest.

SECOND READING [Matthew 10.34–11.1]:

Jesus continued, 'Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. 
For I have come to set a man against his father,
and a daughter against her mother,
and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; 
and one's foes will be members of one's own household. 
Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me; and whoever does not take up the cross and follow me is not worthy of me. Those who find their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. 

'Whoever welcomes you welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me. Whoever welcomes a prophet in the name of a prophet will receive a prophet's reward; and whoever welcomes a righteous person in the name of a righteous person will receive the reward of the righteous; and whoever gives even a cup of cold water to one of these little ones in the name of a disciple—truly I tell you, none of these will lose their reward.' 

Now when Jesus had finished instructing his twelve disciples, he went on from there to teach and proclaim his message in their cities. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Almighty God,
maker of all good things and Father of all;
you have shown us in Christ the purpose of your creation
and call us to be responsible in the world.

We pray for the world
all the nations....
our own country....
those in authority....
the peace of the world....
racial harmony....
those who maintain order....

Almighty God, we give you thanks
for the order of created things
the resources of the earth
and the gift of human life....

for the continuing work of creation,
man's share in it,
and for creative vision and inventive skill....

for your faithfulness to man in patience and in love,
and for every human response of obedience
and humble achievement....

O God, our eternal redeemer,
by the presence of your Spirit
you renew and direct our hearts.
Keep always in our mind
the end of all things and the day of judgment.
Inspire us for a holy life here,
and bring us to the joy of the resurrection,
through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.
		
O God, 
your Son taught that whoever does your will
is his brother and sister and mother:
We give you thanks for your servant Margaret,
called to an earthly throne,
and yet full of love and succor for the poor.
Make us ready to seek your kingdom before all else,
and be fruitful in good works;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the God of hope
fill us with all joy and peace in believing,
so that we may abound in hope
by the power of the Holy Spirit. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is by Thomas Ken and the closing prayer is from Romans 15. The first collect is from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The second collect is adapted from a prayer in For All the Saints, Anglican Church of New Zealand and Mark 3:35.

Born in the year 1046, Margaret was the daughter of the Anglo-Saxon royal house of England but educated in Hungary, where her family lived in exile during the reign of Danish kings in England. After the Norman invasion in 1066, when her royal person still was a threat to the new monarchy, she was welcomed in the royal court of Malcolm III of Scotland and soon afterwards married him in 1069. Theirs was a happy and fruitful union and Margaret proved to be both a civilising and a holy presence. She instituted many church reforms and founded many monasteries, churches and pilgrim hostels. She was a woman of prayer as well as good works who seemed to influence for good all with whom she came into contact. She died on this day in the year 1093. [Exciting Holiness]



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