OREMUS: 13 November 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Nov 12 17:00:01 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for November 13
Charles Simeon, Pastor, Evangelical Divine, 1836

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Creator, Redeemer and Savior God,
in you is the fullness of goodness, mercy, and gentleness.
You alone are just and holy, innocent and pure.
Only in you is all pardon, all grace and all glory,
without beginning and without end.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 68 [CCP]

Let God arise and let his enemies be scattered;*
 let those who hate him flee before him. 
Let them vanish like smoke
   when the wind drives it away;*
 as the wax melts at the fire,
   so let the wicked perish at the presence of God.
But let the righteous be glad and rejoice before God;*
 let them also be merry and joyful.
Sing to God, sing praises to his name;
   exalt him who rides upon the heavens;*
 Yahweh is his name, rejoice before him!
Father of orphans, defender of widows,*
 God in his holy habitation!
God gives the solitary a home

   and brings forth prisoners into freedom;*
 but the rebels shall live in dry places.
O God, when you went forth before your people,*
 when you marched through the wilderness,
The earth shook and the skies poured down rain,
   at the presence of God, the God of Sinai,*
 at the presence of God, the God of Israel.
You sent a gracious rain, O God, upon your inheritance;*
 you refreshed the land when it was weary.
Your people found their home in it;*
 in your goodness, O God,
   you have made provision for the poor.
The Lord gave the word;*
 great was the company of women who bore the tidings:
'Kings with their armies are fleeing away;*
 the women at home are dividing the spoils.'
Though you lingered among the sheepfolds,*
 you shall be like a dove
   whose wings are covered with silver,
   whose feathers are like green gold.
When the Almighty scattered kings,*
 it was like snow falling in Zalmon.
O mighty mountain, O hill of Bashan!*
 O rugged mountain, O hill of Bashan!
Why do you look with envy, O rugged mountain,
   at the hill which God chose for his resting place?*
 truly, the Lord will dwell there for ever.
The chariots of God are twenty thousand,
   even thousands of thousands;*
 the Lord comes in holiness from Sinai.
You have gone up on high and led captivity captive;
   you have received gifts even from your enemies,*
 that the Lord God might dwell among them.
Blessed be the Lord day by day,*
 the God of our salvation, who bears our burdens.
He is our God, the God of our salvation;*
 God is the Lord, by whom we escape death.
Your procession is seen, O God,*
 your procession into the sanctuary, my God and my King.
The singers go before, musicians follow after,*
 in the midst of maidens playing upon the handdrums.
Bless God in the congregation;*
 bless the Lord, you that are of the fountain of Israel.
There is Benjamin, least of the tribes, at the head;
   the princes of Judah in a company;*
 and the princes of Zebulon and Naphtali.
Send forth your strength, O God;*
 establish, O God, what you have wrought for us.
Kings shall bring gifts to you,*
 for your temple's sake at Jerusalem.
Rebuke the wild beast of the reeds,*
 and the peoples, a herd of wild bulls with its calves.
Trample down those who lust after silver;*
 scatter the peoples that delight in war.
Let tribute be brought out of Egypt;*
 let Ethiopia stretch out her hands to God.
Sing to God, O kingdoms of the earth;*
 sing praises to the Lord.
He rides in the heavens, the ancient heavens;*
 he sends forth his voice, his mighty voice.
Ascribe power to God;*
 his majesty is over Israel;
   his strength is in the skies.
How wonderful is God in his holy places!*
 the God of Israel giving strength and power to his people!
   Blessed be God!

FIRST READING [Isaiah 5.8–24]:

Ah, you who join house to house,
   who add field to field,
until there is room for no one but you,
   and you are left to live alone
   in the midst of the land! 
The Lord of hosts has sworn in my hearing:
Surely many houses shall be desolate,
   large and beautiful houses, without inhabitant. 
For ten acres of vineyard shall yield but one bath,
   and a homer of seed shall yield a mere ephah. 

Ah, you who rise early in the morning
   in pursuit of strong drink,
who linger in the evening
   to be inflamed by wine, 
whose feasts consist of lyre and harp,
   tambourine and flute and wine,
but who do not regard the deeds of the Lord,
   or see the work of his hands! 
Therefore my people go into exile without knowledge;
their nobles are dying of hunger,
   and their multitude is parched with thirst. 

Therefore Sheol has enlarged its appetite
   and opened its mouth beyond measure;
the nobility of Jerusalem and her multitude go down,
   her throng and all who exult in her. 
People are bowed down, everyone is brought low,
   and the eyes of the haughty are humbled. 
But the Lord of hosts is exalted by justice,
   and the Holy God shows himself holy by righteousness. 
Then the lambs shall graze as in their pasture,
   fatlings and kids shall feed among the ruins. 

Ah, you who drag iniquity along with cords of falsehood,
   who drag sin along as with cart-ropes, 
who say, ‘Let him make haste,
   let him speed his work
   that we may see it;
let the plan of the Holy One of Israel hasten to fulfilment,
   that we may know it!’ 
Ah, you who call evil good
   and good evil,
who put darkness for light
   and light for darkness,
who put bitter for sweet
   and sweet for bitter! 
Ah, you who are wise in your own eyes,
   and shrewd in your own sight! 
Ah, you who are heroes in drinking wine
   and valiant at mixing drink, 
who acquit the guilty for a bribe,
   and deprive the innocent of their rights! 

Therefore, as the tongue of fire devours the stubble,
   and as dry grass sinks down in the flame,
so their root will become rotten,
   and their blossom go up like dust;
for they have rejected the instruction of the Lord of hosts,
   and have despised the word of the Holy One of Israel. 

HYMN 
Words: V1 Johannes Müller (1756-1790); V2 Lewis Renatus West (1753-1826)
Tune: Dulce carmen

Sing with humble hearts your praises
For our Saviour's boundless grace;
Pay due homage to Christ Jesus,
Come with thanks before his face:
Praise him for his death and bleeding,
All our happiness lies there;
Praise him for his gracious leading;
Praise your faithful Shepherd's care.

Praise for every scene distressing;
Praise for all thou didst endure;
Praise for every gift and blessing
Which thy griefs for us procure:
In thy ransomed congregation
Shall thy death our theme remain,
Till thou com'st with full salvation,
Lord of glory, Lamb once slain.

SECOND READING [Matthew 9.18–34]:

While he was saying these things to them, suddenly a leader of the synagogue came in and knelt before him, saying, 'My daughter has just died; but come and lay your hand on her, and she will live.' And Jesus got up and followed him, with his disciples. Then suddenly a woman who had been suffering from haemorrhages for twelve years came up behind him and touched the fringe of his cloak, for she said to herself, 'If I only touch his cloak, I will be made well.' Jesus turned, and seeing her he said, 'Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.' And instantly the woman was made well. When Jesus came to the leader's house and saw the flute-players and the crowd making a commotion, he said, 'Go away; for the girl is not dead but sleeping.' And they laughed at him. But when the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her by the hand, and the girl got up. And the report of this spread throughout that district. 

As Jesus went on from there, two blind men followed him, crying loudly, 'Have mercy on us, Son of David!' When he entered the house, the blind men came to him; and Jesus said to them, 'Do you believe that I am able to do this?' They said to him, 'Yes, Lord.' Then he touched their eyes and said, 'According to your faith let it be done to you.' And their eyes were opened. Then Jesus sternly ordered them, 'See that no one knows of this.' But they went away and spread the news about him throughout that district. 

After they had gone away, a demoniac who was mute was brought to him. And when the demon had been cast out, the one who had been mute spoke; and the crowds were amazed and said, 'Never has anything like this been seen in Israel.' But the Pharisees said, 'By the ruler of the demons he casts out the demons.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us with confidence present our prayers and supplications to the throne of grace.

We pray for all those in positions of power,
that they may govern with wisdom and integrity, 
serving the needs of their people.
May your reign come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for the Church, the sign of your reign,
that it may extend your welcome to people of every race and background.
May your kingdom come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for Christians of every denomination,
that together we may come to understand the royal priesthood
you bestowed on us in baptism.  
May your dominion come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for those whose commitment to truth 
brings them into conflict with earthly powers, 
that they may have the courage to endure.
May your rule come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for this community of faith,
that attentive to your word, 
we may always worship in spirit and in truth.
May your reign come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord,
we often feel that our prayers scarcely reach the ceiling;
but may we get into this humble spirit
by considering how good you are,
and how short we fall,
and then our prayer will mount on wings of faith to heaven. Amen.
		
Merciful and gracious God,
you gave Charles Simeon such a love for souls
that he preached and laboured fervently,
so that all might come to their true home;
so fill our hearts and minds with your goodness,
that we may be one with you at all times,
in the fellowship of Jesus Christ our Redeemer. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Our calling is not primarily to be holy,
but to work for God and for others with Him. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is adapted from a prayer by Saint Francis. The first collect and closing sentence are adapted from writings of Charles Simeon. The second collect is from For All the Saints, Anglican Church of New Zealand. 

Born in Reading in 1759, Charles Simeon was educated at Cambridge University and spent the rest of his life in that city. He became a fellow of King's College in 1782 and was ordained priest the following year, when he became vicar of Holy Trinity Church nearby. He had evangelical leanings as a boy but it was whilst preparing for holy communion on his entrance to College that he became aware of the redeeming love of God, an experience he regarded as the turning point in his life. Many of the parishioners of Holy Trinity Church did not welcome him, since he had been appointed through his own family links, but his patent care and love for them all overcame their antipathy and his preaching greatly increased the congregation. Charles had carved on the inside of the pulpit in Holy Trinity Church, where only the preacher could see, the words from John 12:21, when Philip brought the Greeks to our Lord, and they said "Sir, we would see Jesus." These words were a constant reminder to him that people came not to gaze on a great preacher or to admire his eloquence, but to seek Jesus. Charles became a leading Evangelical influence in the Church and was one of the founders of the Church Missionary Society. He also set up the Simeon Trust which made appointments to parishes of fellow Evangelicals. He remained vicar of Holy Trinity parish until his death on this day in the year 1836. [Exciting Holiness]


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