OREMUS: 1 April 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Mar 31 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for April 1
Frederick Denison Maurice, Priest, Teacher of the Faith, 1872

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, almighty God,
for in your kindness and mercy, 
patience and faithfulness,
you are always ready to forgive and not punish.
We thank you for your Son,
our Savior and Brother, Jesus Christ,
by whose example and strength
we turn our backs on the lures of evil,
seeking instead to store up treasure in heaven,
knowing that though we may seem to have nothing,
in reality we possess everything in you. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 6

Lord, do not rebuke me in your anger;*
 do not punish me in your wrath.
Have pity on me, Lord, for I am weak;*
 heal me, Lord, for my bones are racked.
My spirit shakes with terror;*
 how long, O Lord, how long?
Turn, O Lord, and deliver me;*
 save me for your mercy's sake.
For in death no one remembers you;*
 and who will give you thanks in the grave?
I grow weary because of my groaning;*
 every night I drench my bed
   and flood my couch with tears.
My eyes are wasted with grief*
 and worn away because of all my enemies.
Depart from me, all evildoers,*
 for the Lord has heard the sound of my weeping.
The Lord has heard my supplication;*
 the Lord accepts my prayer.
All my enemies shall be confounded and quake with fear;*
 they shall turn back and suddenly be put to shame.

Psalm 7

O Lord my God, I take refuge in you;*
 save and deliver me from all who pursue me;
Lest like a lion they tear me in pieces*
 and snatch me away with none to deliver me.
O Lord my God, if I have done these things:*
 if there is any wickedness in my hands,
If I have repaid my friend with evil,*
 or plundered one who without cause is my enemy;
Then let my enemy pursue and overtake me,*
 trample my life into the ground,
   and lay my honour in the dust.
Stand up, O Lord, in your wrath;*
 rise up against the fury of my enemies.
Awake, O my God, decree justice;*
 let the assembly of the peoples gather round you.
Be seated on your lofty throne, O Most High;*
 O Lord, judge the nations.
Give judgement for me
   according to my righteousness, O Lord,*
 and according to my innocence, O Most High.
Let the malice of the wicked come to an end,
   but establish the righteous;*
 for you test the mind and heart, O righteous God.
God is my shield and defence;*
 he is the saviour of the true in heart.
God is a righteous judge;*
 God sits in judgement every day.
If they will not repent, God will whet his sword;*
 he will bend his bow and make it ready.
He has prepared his weapons of death;*
 he makes his arrows shafts of fire.
Look at those who are in labour with wickedness,*
 who conceive evil and give birth to a lie.
They dig a pit and make it deep*
 and fall into the hole that they have made.
Their malice turns back upon their own head;*
 their violence falls on their own scalp.
I will bear witness that the Lord is righteous;*
 I will praise the name of the Lord Most High.

Psalm 8

O Lord our governor,*
 how exalted is your name in all the world!
Out of the mouths of infants and children*
 your majesty is praised above the heavens.
You have set up a stronghold against your adversaries,*
 to quell the enemy and the avenger.
When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers,*
 the moon and the stars you have set in their courses,
What are mortals, that you should be mindful of them?*
 mere human beings, that you should seek them out?
You have made them little lower than the angels;*
 you adorn them with glory and honour.
You give them mastery over the works of your hands;*
 and put all things under their feet,
All sheep and oxen,*
 even the wild beasts of the field,
The birds of the air, the fish of the sea,*
 and whatsoever walks in the paths of the sea.
O Lord our governor,*
 how exalted is your name in all the world!

FIRST READING [Jeremiah 21.1–10]:

This is the word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord, when King Zedekiah sent to him Pashhur son of Malchiah and the priest Zephaniah son of Maaseiah, saying, 'Please inquire of the Lord on our behalf, for King Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon is making war against us; perhaps the Lord will perform a wonderful deed for us, as he has often done, and will make him withdraw from us.' 

Then Jeremiah said to them: Thus you shall say to Zedekiah: Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel: I am going to turn back the weapons of war that are in your hands and with which you are fighting against the king of Babylon and against the Chaldeans who are besieging you outside the walls; and I will bring them together into the centre of this city. I myself will fight against you with outstretched hand and mighty arm, in anger, in fury, and in great wrath. And I will strike down the inhabitants of this city, both human beings and animals; they shall die of a great pestilence. Afterwards, says the Lord, I will give King Zedekiah of Judah, and his servants, and the people in this city—those who survive the pestilence, sword, and famine—into the hands of King Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon, into the hands of their enemies, into the hands of those who seek their lives. He shall strike them down with the edge of the sword; he shall not pity them, or spare them, or have compassion. 

And to this people you shall say: Thus says the Lord: See, I am setting before you the way of life and the way of death. Those who stay in this city shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence; but those who go out and surrender to the Chaldeans who are besieging you shall live and shall have their lives as a prize of war. For I have set my face against this city for evil and not for good, says the Lord: it shall be given into the hands of the king of Babylon, and he shall burn it with fire. 

HYMN 
Words: Albert W T Orsborn (1886-1967) © Holder untraced
Meter: SMD

I have no claim on grace;
I have no right to plead;
I stand before my maker's face
Condemned in thought and deed.
But since there died a Lamb
Who, guiltless, my guilt bore,
I lay fast hold on Jesus' name,
And sin is mine no more.

>From whence my soul's distress
But from the hold of sin?
And whence my hope of righteousness
But from thy grace within?
I speak to thee my need
And tell my true complaint;
Thou only canst convert indeed
A sinner to a saint.

O pardon-speaking blood!
O soul-renewing grace!
Through Christ I know the love of God
And see the Father's face.
I now set forth thy praise,
Thy loyal servant I,
And gladly dedicate my days
My God to glorify.

SECOND READING [Romans 3.21–end]:

But now, irrespective of law, the righteousness of God has been disclosed, and is attested by the law and the prophets, the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction, since all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God; they are now justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a sacrifice of atonement by his blood, effective through faith. He did this to show his righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over the sins previously committed; it was to prove at the present time that he himself is righteous and that he justifies the one who has faith in Jesus. 

Then what becomes of boasting? It is excluded. By what law? By that of works? No, but by the law of faith. For we hold that a person is justified by faith apart from works prescribed by the law. Or is God the God of Jews only? Is he not the God of Gentiles also? Yes, of Gentiles also, since God is one; and he will justify the circumcised on the ground of faith and the uncircumcised through that same faith. Do we then overthrow the law by this faith? By no means! On the contrary, we uphold the law. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Jesus, remember us when you come into your kingdom.
Hear our intercessions. 
For your church around the world, 
we ask new life.

For all who carry out ministries in your church, 
we ask grace and wisdom. 

For people who have accepted spiritual disciplines, 
we ask inspired discipleship.

For Christians of every land, 
we ask new unity in your name. 

For those who cannot believe, 
we ask your faithful love. 

For governors and rulers in every land, 
we ask your guidance. 

For people who suffer and sorrow, 
we ask your healing peace. 

Holy God, 
your Word, Jesus Christ, spoke peace to a sinful world
and brought humanity the gift of reconciliation
by the suffering and death he endured. 
Teach us who bear his name to follow his example. 
May our faith, hope, and charity
turn hatred to love, conflict to peace, and death to eternal life, 
through Christ, our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God, 
who restored the dignity of our nature 
through the perfect obedience of your Son, 
quicken in your Church a passion for justice and truth,
that like your servant Frederick Denison Maurice, 
we may continually work and pray 
for the triumph of the kingdom of Christ;
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen. 
       
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Bring light into the darkness of our hearts,
and anoint us with your Spirit. Amen.

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The psalms, the intercession and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from
_Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint
Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses one sentence from _Revised
Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on
Common Texts and another sentence from _Opening Prayers: Collects in
Contemporary Language_.

The intercession and first collect are reprinted by permission from _The Worship Sourcebook_, (c) 2004 CRC Publications. 

The second collect is from _For All the Saints_, (c) General
Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, 1994.

Born into a Unitarian family in 1805, Frederick Maurice became an Anglican in his twenties and was then ordained. He was one of the founders of the Christian Socialist Movement, in which his particular concern was providing education for working men. As a theologian, Maurice's ideas on Anglican comprehensiveness have remained influential. His best-remembered book, The Kingdom of Christ, demonstrated his philosophical approach to theology. His radicalism was revealed in his attack on traditional concepts of hell in Theological Essays, which cost him his Professorship at Kings College, London, in 1853. In 1866, however, he was given a chair in Cambridge, which he held until his death on this day in 1872. [Exciting Holiness]


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