OREMUS: 27 March 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Mar 26 17:00:01 GMT 2011


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org 
*******************************************************

OREMUS for March 27
Charles Henry Brent, Bishop of the Philippines,
and of Western New York, 1929 

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, God of compassion and mercy:
your steadfast love is shown to every living thing;
your word calls us forth and your law revives and refreshes.
You call us to repent our misuse of your gifts,
that we may be transformed by your wisdom
to manifest for others
the mercy of our crucified and risen Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
<!
http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html
>

Psalm 120

When I was in trouble I called to the Lord,*
 I called to the Lord and he answered me.
Deliver me, O Lord, from lying lips*
 and from the deceitful tongue.
What shall be done to you and what more besides,*
 O you deceitful tongue?
The sharpened arrows of a warrior,*
 along with hot glowing coals.
How hateful it is that I must lodge in Meshech*
 and dwell among the tents of Kedar!
Too long have I had to live*
 among the enemies of peace.
I am on the side of peace,*

 but when I speak of it, they are for war.

Psalm 121

I lift up my eyes to the hills;*
 from where is my help to come?
My help comes from the Lord,*
 the maker of heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved*
 and he who watches over you will not fall asleep.
Behold, he who keeps watch over Israel*
 shall neither slumber nor sleep;
The Lord himself watches over you;*
 the Lord is your shade at your right hand,
So that the sun shall not strike you by day,*
 nor the moon by night.
The Lord shall preserve you from all evil;*
 it is he who shall keep you safe.
The Lord shall watch over your going out
   and your coming in,*
 from this time forth for evermore.

Psalm 122

I was glad when they said to me,*
 'Let us go to the house of the Lord.'
Now our feet are standing*
 within your gates, O Jerusalem.
Jerusalem is built as a city*
 that is at unity with itself.
To which the tribes go up, the tribes of the Lord,*
 the assembly of Israel, to praise the name of the Lord.
For there are the thrones of judgement,*
 the thrones of the house of David.
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:*
 'May they prosper who love you.
'Peace be within your walls*
 and quietness within your towers.
'For my family and companions' sake,*
 I pray for your prosperity.
'Because of the house of the Lord our God,*
 I will seek to do you good.'

Psalm 123

To you I lift up my eyes,*
 to you enthroned in the heavens.
As the eyes of servants look to the hand of their masters,*
 and the eyes of a maid to the hand of her mistress,
So our eyes look to the Lord our God,*
 until he show us his mercy.
Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy,*
 for we have had more than enough of contempt,
Too much of the scorn of the indolent rich,*
 and of the derision of the proud.

Psalm 124

If the Lord had not been on our side,*
 let Israel now say;
If the Lord had not been on our side,*
 when enemies rose up against us;
Then would they have swallowed us up alive*
 in their fierce anger towards us;
Then would the waters have overwhelmed us*
 and the torrent gone over us;
Then would the raging waters*
 have gone right over us.
Blessed be the Lord!*
 he has not given us over to be a prey for their teeth.
We have escaped like a bird
   from the snare of the fowler;*
 the snare is broken and we have escaped.
Our help is in the name of the Lord,*
 the maker of heaven and earth.

Psalm 125

Those who trust in the Lord are like Mount Zion,*
 which cannot be moved, but stands fast for ever.
The hills stand about Jerusalem;*
 so does the Lord stand round about his people,
   from this time forth for evermore.
The sceptre of the wicked shall not hold sway
   over the land allotted to the just,*
 so that the just shall not put their hands to evil.
Show your goodness, O Lord, to those who are good*
 and to those who are true of heart.
As for those who turn aside to crooked ways,
   the Lord will lead them away with the evildoers;*
 but peace be upon Israel.

FIRST READING [Genesis 27:30–45; 28:10–22]:

As soon as Isaac had finished blessing Jacob, when Jacob had scarcely gone out from the presence of his father Isaac, his brother Esau came in from his hunting. He also prepared savoury food, and brought it to his father. And he said to his father, 'Let my father sit up and eat of his son's game, so that you may bless me.' His father Isaac said to him, 'Who are you?' He answered, 'I am your firstborn son, Esau.' Then Isaac trembled violently, and said, 'Who was it then that hunted game and brought it to me, and I ate it all before you came, and I have blessed him?—yes, and blessed he shall be!' When Esau heard his father's words, he cried out with an exceedingly great and bitter cry, and said to his father, 'Bless me, me also, father!' But he said, 'Your brother came deceitfully, and he has taken away your blessing.' Esau said, 'Is he not rightly named Jacob? For he has supplanted me these two times. He took away my birthright; and look, now he has taken away my blessing.' Then he said, 'Have you not reserved a blessing for me?' Isaac answered Esau, 'I have already made him your lord, and I have given him all his brothers as servants, and with grain and wine I have sustained him. What then can I do for you, my son?' Esau said to his father, 'Have you only one blessing, father? Bless me, me also, father!' And Esau lifted up his voice and wept. 

Then his father Isaac answered him:
'See, away from the fatness of the earth shall your home be,
   and away from the dew of heaven on high. 
By your sword you shall live,
   and you shall serve your brother;
but when you break loose,
   you shall break his yoke from your neck.' 

Now Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing with which his father had blessed him, and Esau said to himself, 'The days of mourning for my father are approaching; then I will kill my brother Jacob.' But the words of her elder son Esau were told to Rebekah; so she sent and called her younger son Jacob and said to him, 'Your brother Esau is consoling himself by planning to kill you. Now therefore, my son, obey my voice; flee at once to my brother Laban in Haran, and stay with him for a while, until your brother's fury turns away— until your brother's anger against you turns away, and he forgets what you have done to him; then I will send, and bring you back from there. Why should I lose both of you in one day?' 

Jacob left Beer-sheba and went towards Haran. He came to a certain place and stayed there for the night, because the sun had set. Taking one of the stones of the place, he put it under his head and lay down in that place. And he dreamed that there was a ladder set up on the earth, the top of it reaching to heaven; and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. And the Lord stood beside him and said, 'I am the Lord, the God of Abraham your father and the God of Isaac; the land on which you lie I will give to you and to your offspring; and your offspring shall be like the dust of the earth, and you shall spread abroad to the west and to the east and to the north and to the south; and all the families of the earth shall be blessed in you and in your offspring. Know that I am with you and will keep you wherever you go, and will bring you back to this land; for I will not leave you until I have done what I have promised you.' Then Jacob woke from his sleep and said, 'Surely the Lord is in this place—and I did not know it!' And he was afraid, and said, 'How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.' 

So Jacob rose early in the morning, and he took the stone that he had put under his head and set it up for a pillar and poured oil on the top of it. He called that place Bethel; but the name of the city was Luz at the first. Then Jacob made a vow, saying, 'If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat and clothing to wear, so that I come again to my father's house in peace, then the Lord shall be my God, and this stone, which I have set up for a pillar, shall be God's house; and of all that you give me I will surely give one-tenth to you.' 

HYMN 
Words: Isaac Watts (1674-1748)
Tune: Irish, Stockton

Long as I live I'll bless Thy Name,
My King, my God of love;
My work and joy shall be the same
In the bright world above.

Great is the Lord, His power unknown,
And let His praise be great:
I'll sing the honours of Thy throne,
Thy works of grace repeat.

Thy grace shall dwell upon my tongue,
And while my lips rejoice,
The men that hear my sacred song
Shall join their cheerful voice.

Fathers to sons shall teach Thy Name,
And children learn Thy ways;
Ages to come Thy truth proclaim,
And nations sound Thy praise.

Thy glorious deeds of ancient date
Shall through the world be known;
Thine arm of power, Thy heavenly state,
With public splendour shown.

The world is managed by Thy hands,
Thy saints are ruled by love;
And Thine eternal kingdom stands,
Though rocks and hills remove.

SECOND READING [Mark 9:1-13]:

And he said to them, 'Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death until they see that the kingdom of God has come with power.' 

Six days later, Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain apart, by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, and his clothes became dazzling white, such as no one on earth could bleach them. And there appeared to them Elijah with Moses, who were talking with Jesus. Then Peter said to Jesus, 'Rabbi, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.' He did not know what to say, for they were terrified. Then a cloud overshadowed them, and from the cloud there came a voice, 'This is my Son, the Beloved; listen to him!' Suddenly when they looked around, they saw no one with them any more, but only Jesus. 

As they were coming down the mountain, he ordered them to tell no one about what they had seen, until after the Son of Man had risen from the dead. So they kept the matter to themselves, questioning what this rising from the dead could mean. Then they asked him, 'Why do the scribes say that Elijah must come first?' He said to them, 'Elijah is indeed coming first to restore all things. How then is it written about the Son of Man, that he is to go through many sufferings and be treated with contempt? But I tell you that Elijah has come, and they did to him whatever they pleased, as it is written about him.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
My brothers and sisters, let us pray to the Lord who gives his people the water of life.

We pray for the Libyan people at this time of violence and unrest: may there be a just and lasting peace, and freedom in their land.

We pray for the people of Japan in the wake of the tsunami and the concerns about nuclear contamination: may they be kept safe and enabled to rebuild their lives.

We pray for the peoples of the Holy Land following the recent violence in Israel and Palestine: that all the peoples of that land may come to live together peacefully in mutual trust and reconciliation.

We pray for the people of Syria, Yemen and other Arab nations who are seeking freedom and justice in their lands: may their voices be heard by those in authority, and may there be an end to violence and oppression.

We pray for all in our country whose lives are being affected by cuts in employment, benefits and services: may our society learn to have a true concern to support all those who are vulnerable and in need.

We pray during this Lent for those who are preparing to be baptised or received into Full Communion: may this be for them a time of growth in faith, and may we welcome them with joy into our community.

Heavenly Father, your Son Jesus Christ offers living water to all who follow him; we ask you to hear the prayers that we offer this day, through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Eternal God, 
your kingdom has broken into our troubled world 
through the life, death, and resurrection of your Son: 
Help us to hear your Word and obey it, 
that we may become instruments of your saving love; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and forever. Amen.

Gracious God in heaven, 
whose Son prayed that we all might be one: 
Deliver us from arrogance and prejudice, 
and give us wisdom and forbearance, 
that, following your servant Charles Henry Brent, 
we may be united in one family 
with all who confess the Name of your Son Jesus Christ;
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

God of love,
turn our hearts to your ways;
and give us peace. Amen.
*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases from _Opening
Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press,
Norwich, 1999.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

In 1902, the Episcopal Church appointed Charles Brent as Missionary Bishop of the
Philippines. He arrived on the same ship with the American Governor, William
H. Taft, and carried with him the unofficial but very real prestige of the
American establishment.
Brent could easily have confined himself to providing a kind of ecclesiastical
"home away from home" for American officials and others stationed in the
Islands. Equally, he could have devoted himself chiefly to efforts to convert the
Roman Catholics, both of Spanish and of Filipino ancestry, whom the previous
government had left behind. Instead, he directed his efforts toward the
non-Christians of his diocese: the pagan Igorots of the mountains of Luzon, the
Muslims of the southern islands, the Chinese settlements in Manila, all areas in
which he made considerable inroads and established thriving Christian
communities.
He began a campaign against the opium traffic, and served on several
international commissions devoted to stamping out international traffic in
narcotics. During World War I, he was the Senior Chaplain for the American
Armed Forces in Europe. He declined three elections to bishoprics in the
United States in order to continue his work in the Philippines, but in 1918, he
accepted the position of Bishop of Western New York. His experiences in the
Philippines had aroused in him a strong concern for the cause of visible
Christian unity. 

He helped to organize the first World Conference on Faith and Order, which
met in Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1927. He died there in 1929. [James Kiefer]


More information about the oremus mailing list