OREMUS: 18 March 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Mar 17 22:40:21 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for March 18
Cyril, Bishop of Jerusalem, Teacher of the Faith, 386

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

God of life and death,
from the fullness of yourself
you have created all that is;
through the power of your love
you call us towards you;
in the giving of your Son
our salvation has been wrought.
Our flowering and our passing,
all the seasons of the vine,
belong to you.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 90

Lord, you have been our refuge*
 from one generation to another.
Before the mountains were brought forth,
   or the land and the earth were born,*
 from age to age you are God.
You turn us back to the dust and say,*
 'Go back, O child of earth.'
For a thousand years in your sight
   are like yesterday when it is past*
 and like a watch in the night.
You sweep us away like a dream;*
 we fade away suddenly like the grass.
In the morning it is green and flourishes;*
 in the evening it is dried up and withered.
For we consume away in your displeasure;*
 we are afraid because of your wrathful indignation.
Our iniquities you have set before you,*
 and our secret sins in the light of your countenance.
When you are angry, all our days are gone;*
 we bring our years to an end like a sigh.
The span of our life is seventy years,
   perhaps in strength even eighty;*
 yet the sum of them is but labour and sorrow,
   for they pass away quickly and we are gone.
Who regards the power of your wrath?*
 who rightly fears your indignation?
So teach us to number our days*
 that we may apply our hearts to wisdom.
Return, O Lord; how long will you tarry?*
 be gracious to your servants.
Satisfy us by your lovingkindness in the morning;*
 so shall we rejoice and be glad all the days of our life.
Make us glad by the measure of the days
   that you afflicted us*
 and the years in which we suffered adversity.
Show your servants your works*
 and your splendour to their children.
May the graciousness of the Lord our God be upon us;*
 prosper the work of our hands;
   prosper our handiwork.

Psalm 91

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High,*
 abides under the shadow of the Almighty.
He shall say to the Lord,
   'You are my refuge and my stronghold,*
 my God in whom I put my trust.'
He shall deliver you from the snare of the hunter*
 and from the deadly pestilence.
He shall cover you with his pinions,
   and you shall find refuge under his wings;*
 his faithfulness shall be a shield and buckler.
You shall not be afraid of any terror by night,*
 nor of the arrow that flies by day;
Of the plague that stalks in the darkness,*
 nor of the sickness that lays waste at midday.
A thousand shall fall at your side
   and ten thousand at your right hand,*
 but it shall not come near you.
Your eyes have only to behold*
 to see the reward of the wicked.
Because you have made the Lord your refuge,*
 and the Most High your habitation.
There shall no evil happen to you,*
 neither shall any plague come near your dwelling.
For he shall give his angels charge over you,*
 to keep you in all your ways.
They shall bear you in their hands,*
 lest you dash your foot against a stone.
You shall tread upon the lion and adder;*
 you shall trample the young lion and the serpent
   under your feet.
Because he is bound to me in love,
   therefore will I deliver him;*
 I will protect him, because he knows my name.
He shall call upon me and I will answer him;*
 I am with him in trouble,
   I will rescue him and bring him to honour.
With long life will I satisfy him,*
 and show him my salvation.

Psalm 92

It is a good thing to give thanks to the Lord,*
 and to sing praises to your name, O Most High;
To tell of your lovingkindness early in the morning*
 and of your faithfulness in the night season;
On the psaltery and on the lyre*
 and to the melody of the harp.
For you have made me glad by your acts, O Lord;*
 and I shout for joy because of the works of your hands.
Lord, how great are your works!*
 your thoughts are very deep.
The dullard does not know,
   nor does the fool understand,*
 that though the wicked grow like weeds,
   and all the workers of iniquity flourish,
They flourish only to be destroyed for ever;*
 but you, O Lord, are exalted for evermore.
For lo, your enemies, O Lord,
   lo, your enemies shall perish,*
 and all the workers of iniquity shall be scattered.
But my horn you have exalted
   like the horns of wild bulls;*
 I am anointed with fresh oil.
My eyes also gloat over my enemies,*
 and my ears rejoice to hear the doom of the wicked
   who rise up against me.
The righteous shall flourish like a palm tree,*
 and shall spread abroad like a cedar of Lebanon.
Those who are planted in the house of the Lord*
 shall flourish in the courts of our God;
They shall still bear fruit in old age;*
 they shall be green and succulent;
That they may show how upright the Lord is,*
 my rock, in whom there is no fault.

FIRST READING [Genesis 13:1–18]:

So Abram went up from Egypt, he and his wife and all that he had, and Lot with him, into the Negeb. 

Now Abram was very rich in livestock, in silver, and in gold. He journeyed on by stages from the Negeb as far as Bethel, to the place where his tent had been at the beginning, between Bethel and Ai, to the place where he had made an altar at the first; and there Abram called on the name of the Lord. Now Lot, who went with Abram, also had flocks and herds and tents, so that the land could not support both of them living together; for their possessions were so great that they could not live together, and there was strife between the herders of Abram's livestock and the herders of Lot's livestock. At that time the Canaanites and the Perizzites lived in the land. 

Then Abram said to Lot, 'Let there be no strife between you and me, and between your herders and my herders; for we are kindred. Is not the whole land before you? Separate yourself from me. If you take the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if you take the right hand, then I will go to the left.' Lot looked about him, and saw that the plain of the Jordan was well watered everywhere like the garden of the Lord, like the land of Egypt, in the direction of Zoar; this was before the Lord had destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah. So Lot chose for himself all the plain of the Jordan, and Lot journeyed eastwards; thus they separated from each other. Abram settled in the land of Canaan, while Lot settled among the cities of the Plain and moved his tent as far as Sodom. Now the people of Sodom were wicked, great sinners against the Lord. 

The Lord said to Abram, after Lot had separated from him, 'Raise your eyes now, and look from the place where you are, northwards and southwards and eastwards and westwards; for all the land that you see I will give to you and to your offspring for ever. I will make your offspring like the dust of the earth; so that if one can count the dust of the earth, your offspring also can be counted. Rise up, walk through the length and the breadth of the land, for I will give it to you.' So Abram moved his tent, and came and settled by the oaks of Mamre, which are at Hebron; and there he built an altar to the Lord. 

HYMN 
Words: Mathias Cervenka (1521-1569) tr Petrus Herbert (fl 1566-1571) tr Frederick W Foster (1760-1835)
Tune: Sinners' Redeemer (10 10 10 10)

How good it is, how pleasant to behold
The favoured sheep of our good shepherd's fold,
Obeying him, in love and knowledge grow,
Each sharing in the other's weal and woe.

Fullness of grace in him, the Head, abounds;
Hence every blessing to his Church redounds;
He dwells with us, and by his Spirit's light
To love each other teaches us aright.

When love unfeigned our actions truly show,
The God of peace his blessing will bestow;
O Lord, unite thy Church for Jesus' sake,
And bless what in thy name we undertake.

SECOND READING [Mark 5:1–20]:

They came to the other side of the lake, to the country of the Gerasenes. And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately a man out of the tombs with an unclean spirit met him. He lived among the tombs; and no one could restrain him any more, even with a chain; for he had often been restrained with shackles and chains, but the chains he wrenched apart, and the shackles he broke in pieces; and no one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always howling and bruising himself with stones. When he saw Jesus from a distance, he ran and bowed down before him; and he shouted at the top of his voice, 'What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.' For he had said to him, 'Come out of the man, you unclean spirit!' Then Jesus asked him, 'What is your name?' He replied, 'My name is Legion; for we are many.' He begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now there on the hillside a great herd of swine was feeding; and the unclean spirits begged him, 'Send us into the swine; let us enter them.' So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the swine; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the lake, and were drowned in the lake. 

The swineherds ran off and told it in the city and in the country. Then people came to see what it was that had happened. They came to Jesus and saw the demoniac sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, the very man who had had the legion; and they were afraid. Those who had seen what had happened to the demoniac and to the swine reported it. Then they began to beg Jesus to leave their neighbourhood. As he was getting into the boat, the man who had been possessed by demons begged him that he might be with him. But Jesus refused, and said to him, 'Go home to your friends, and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and what mercy he has shown you.' And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him; and everyone was amazed. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
O Lord, answer us in the day of trouble,
Send us help from your holy place.

Show us the path of life,
For in your presence is joy.

Give justice to the orphan and oppressed
And break the power of wickedness and evil.

Look upon the hungry and sorrowful
And grant them the help for which they long.

Let the heavens rejoice and the earth be glad;
May your glory endure for ever.

Your kingship has dominion over all
And with you is our redemption.

God of saving power, 
remember us in times of sorrow and despair. 
Redeem us with your strength
and guide us through the wilderness. 
We ask this in the Name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Strengthen, O Lord, 
the bishops of your Church 
in their special calling 
to be teachers and ministers of the Sacraments, 
so that they, like your servant Cyril of Jerusalem, 
may effectively instruct your people 
in Christian faith and practice; 
and that we, taught by them, 
may enter more fully into the celebration 
of the Paschal mystery;
through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

The love of God
The light of Christ
And the power of the Spirit
Control your ever thought and action
This day and all days. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases a prayer by the Anglican Church of Australia.

The closing sentence is by John Birch, www.faithandworship.com

Born in about the year 315, probably in Caesarea, Cyril became Bishop of Jerusalem when he was about thirty-four years old. There he nurtured both the resident Christian population and the many pilgrims, following the end of the era of persecution, who were beginning to make their way from all over Christendom to the places associated with Christ. Cyril taught the faith in line with the orthodoxy of the Council of Nicaea and the credal statement that became associated with it. Though he found difficulty with the word in that creed which described Jesus as being 'of one substance with the Father', nevertheless he took the side of the Nicene Party against the Arians, who denied the divinity of Christ. His teaching through his Catechetical Lectures, intended for those preparing for baptism, show him to be a man profoundly orthodox and sound, and his liturgical innovations to celebrate the observance of Holy Week and Easter are the foundation of Christian practices to this day. He died in the year 386. [Exciting Holiness]



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