OREMUS: 2 March 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Mar 1 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for March 2
Chad, Bishop of Lichfield, Missionary, 672

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Lord our God,
you sent your only Son, 
born of a woman,
to redeem your children and set us free. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 9

I will give thanks to you, O Lord, with my whole heart;*
 I will tell of all your marvellous works.
I will be glad and rejoice in you;*
 I will sing to your name, O Most High.
When my enemies are driven back,*
 they will stumble and perish at your presence.
For you have maintained my right and my cause;*
 you sit upon your throne judging right.
You have rebuked the ungodly and destroyed the wicked;*
 you have blotted out their name for ever and ever.
As for the enemy, they are finished, in perpetual ruin,*
 their cities ploughed under,
   the memory of them perished;
But the Lord is enthroned for ever;*
 he has set up his throne for judgement.
It is he who rules the world with righteousness;*
 he judges the peoples with equity.
The Lord will be a refuge for the oppressed,*
 a refuge in time of trouble.
Those who know your name will put their trust in you,*
 for you never forsake those who seek you, O Lord.
Sing praise to the Lord who dwells in Zion;*
 proclaim to the peoples the things he has done.
The avenger of blood will remember them;*
 he will not forget the cry of the afflicted.
Have pity on me, O Lord;*
 see the misery I suffer from those who hate me,
   O you who lift me up from the gate of death;
So that I may tell of all your praises
   and rejoice in your salvation*
 in the gates of the city of Zion.
The ungodly have fallen into the pit they dug,*
 and in the snare they set is their own foot caught.
The Lord is known by his acts of justice;*
 the wicked are trapped in the works of their own hands.
The wicked shall be given over to the grave,*
 and also all the peoples that forget God.
For the needy shall not always be forgotten,*
 and the hope of the poor shall not perish for ever.
Rise up, O Lord,
   let not the ungodly have the upper hand;*
 let them be judged before you.
Put fear upon them, O Lord;*
 let the ungodly know they are but mortal.

Psalm 10

Why do you stand so far off, O Lord,*
 and hide yourself in time of trouble?
The wicked arrogantly persecute the poor,*
 but they are trapped in the schemes they have devised.
The wicked boast of their heart's desire;*
 the covetous curse and revile the Lord.
The wicked are so proud that they care not for God;*
 their only thought is, 'God does not matter.'
Their ways are devious at all times;
   your judgements are far above out of their sight;*
 they defy all their enemies.
They say in their heart, 'I shall not be shaken;*
 no harm shall happen to me ever.'
Their mouth is full of cursing, deceit and oppression;*
 under their tongue are mischief and wrong.
They lurk in ambush in public squares
   and in secret places they murder the innocent;*
 they spy out the helpless.
They lie in wait, like a lion in a covert;
   they lie in wait to seize upon the lowly;*
 they seize the lowly and drag them away in their net.
The innocent are broken and humbled before them;*
 the helpless fall before their power.
They say in their heart, 'God has forgotten;*
 he hides his face; he will never notice.'
Rise up, O Lord;
   lift up your hand, O God;*
 do not forget the afflicted.
Why should the wicked revile God?*
 why should they say in their heart, 'You do not care'?
Surely, you behold trouble and misery;*
 you see it and take it into your own hand.
The helpless commit themselves to you,*
 for you are the helper of orphans.
Break the power of the wicked and evil;*
 search out their wickedness until you find none.
The Lord is king for ever and ever;*
 the ungodly shall perish from his land.
The Lord will hear the desire of the humble;*
 you will strengthen their heart and your ears shall hear;
To give justice to the orphan and oppressed,*
 so that mere mortals may strike terror no more.

Psalm 11

In the Lord have I taken refuge;*
 how then can you say to me,
   'Fly away like a bird to the hilltop;
'For see how the wicked bend the bow
   and fit their arrows to the string,*
 to shoot from ambush at the true of heart.
'When the foundations are being destroyed,*
 what can the righteous do?'
The Lord is in his holy temple;*
 the Lord's throne is in heaven.
His eyes behold the inhabited world;*
 his piercing eye weighs our worth.
The Lord weighs the righteous as well as the wicked,*
 but those who delight in violence he abhors.
Upon the wicked he shall rain coals of fire
   and burning sulphur;*
 a scorching wind shall be their lot.
For the Lord is righteous;
   he delights in righteous deeds;*
 and the just shall see his face.

FIRST READING [Amos 5:18-27]:

Alas for you who desire the day of the Lord!
   Why do you want the day of the Lord?
It is darkness, not light; 
   as if someone fled from a lion,
   and was met by a bear;
or went into the house and rested a hand against the wall,
   and was bitten by a snake. 
Is not the day of the Lord darkness, not light,
   and gloom with no brightness in it? 

I hate, I despise your festivals,
   and I take no delight in your solemn assemblies. 
Even though you offer me your burnt-offerings and grain-offerings,
   I will not accept them;
and the offerings of well-being of your fatted animals
   I will not look upon. 
Take away from me the noise of your songs;
   I will not listen to the melody of your harps. 
But let justice roll down like waters,
   and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream. 

Did you bring to me sacrifices and offerings the forty years in the wilderness, O house of Israel? You shall take up Sakkuth your king, and Kaiwan your star-god, your images that you made for yourselves; therefore I will take you into exile beyond Damascus, says the Lord, whose name is the God of hosts. 

HYMN 
Words: Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), 1885
Tune: Gartan, Hermitage

Love came down at Christmas,
love all lovely, love divine;
love was born at Christmas:
star and angels gave the sign.

Worship we the Godhead,
love incarnate, love divine;
worship we our Jesus,
but wherewith the sacred sign?

Love shall be our token;
love be yours and love be mine,
Love to God and to all men,
love for plea and gift and sign.

SECOND READING [John 11:1–16]:

Now a certain man was ill, Lazarus of Bethany, the village of Mary and her sister Martha. Mary was the one who anointed the Lord with perfume and wiped his feet with her hair; her brother Lazarus was ill. So the sisters sent a message to Jesus, 'Lord, he whom you love is ill.' But when Jesus heard it, he said, 'This illness does not lead to death; rather it is for God's glory, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.' Accordingly, though Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus, after having heard that Lazarus was ill, he stayed two days longer in the place where he was. 

Then after this he said to the disciples, 'Let us go to Judea again.' The disciples said to him, 'Rabbi, the Jews were just now trying to stone you, and are you going there again?' Jesus answered, 'Are there not twelve hours of daylight? Those who walk during the day do not stumble, because they see the light of this world. But those who walk at night stumble, because the light is not in them.' After saying this, he told them, 'Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep, but I am going there to awaken him.' The disciples said to him, 'Lord, if he has fallen asleep, he will be all right.' Jesus, however, had been speaking about his death, but they thought that he was referring merely to sleep. Then Jesus told them plainly, 'Lazarus is dead. For your sake I am glad I was not there, so that you may believe. But let us go to him.' Thomas, who was called the Twin, said to his fellow-disciples, 'Let us also go, that we may die with him.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Give us your peace, O God, that we may rejoice in your
goodness to us and to all your children, and be thankful
for your love revealed in Jesus Christ.
Especially we thank you for
     people who reveal your truth and righteousness...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     courage to be bold disciples...
     those who show hospitality...
     surprises that have blessed us...
     the unity of the church of Jesus Christ...

Give us your peace, O God, that we may be confident of
your care for us and all your children, as we remember
the needs of others. Especially we pray for
     friends and relatives who are far away... 
                            (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     neighbors in special need...
     those who suffer hunger and thirst...
     those who work at night while others sleep...
     Episcopal and Methodist churches… 

All-powerful God, 
in Jesus Christ you turned death into life 
and defeat into victory. 
Increase our faith and trust in him 
that we may triumph over all evil, 
in the strength of the same Jesus Christ,
our Savior and Lord. Amen. 

Almighty God,
from the first fruits of the English nation who turned to Christ,
you called your servant Chad
to be an evangelist and bishop of his own people:
give us grace so to follow his peaceable nature,
      humble spirit and prayerful life,
that we may truly commend to others
the faith which we ourselves profess;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Deliver us from the death of sin, 
and raise us to new life in your Son. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The collect and the closing sentence are adapted from prayers from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Chad was born in Northumbria, the youngest of four sons, all of whom became both priests and monks. They entered the monastery on the isle of Lindisfarne and were taught by St Aidan. Chad's brother Cedd had founded the abbey at Lastingham and, on his brother's death, Chad was elected abbot. During the confusion in ecclesiastical discipline between the Celtic-oriented, Anglo-Saxon hierarchy and the pressure from Rome for conformity, Chad became Bishop of York for a time. He graciously stepped back with the arrival in Britain of Theodore, who doubted the validity of indigenous consecrations. This was eventually rectified and Chad became Bishop of Mercia, a huge diocese the centre of which he moved from Repton to Lichfield. Chad travelled extensively and became much loved for his wisdom and gentleness in otherwise difficult situations. The plague was prevalent at this time and Chad died on this day in the year 672. [Exciting Holiness]


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