OREMUS: 20 June 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Jun 19 17:00:01 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for June 20

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God of all mercies, 
you extend forgiveness and aid again and again. 
You confront us with the mystery of your grace, 
beyond all human comprehension; 
you cause us to be merciful in your Name, 
that all whom we serve may see beyond us
and find you there. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you: 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 104

Bless the Lord, O my soul;*
 O Lord my God, how excellent is your greatness!
   you are clothed with majesty and splendour.
You wrap yourself with light as with a cloak*
 and spread out the heavens like a curtain.
You lay the beams of your chambers
   in the waters above;*
 you make the clouds your chariot;
   you ride on the wings of the wind.
You make the winds your messengers*
 and flames of fire your servants.
You have set the earth upon its foundations,*
 so that it never shall move at any time.
You covered it with the deep as with a mantle;*
 the waters stood higher than the mountains.
At your rebuke they fled;*
 at the voice of your thunder they hastened away.
They went up into the hills
   and down to the valleys beneath,*
 to the places you had appointed for them.
You set the limits that they should not pass;*
 they shall not again cover the earth.
You send the springs into the valleys;*
 they flow between the mountains.
All the beasts of the field drink their fill from them,*
 and the wild asses quench their thirst.
Beside them the birds of the air make their nests*
 and sing among the branches.
You water the mountains from your dwelling on high;*
 the earth is fully satisfied by the fruit of your works.
You make grass grow for flocks and herds*
 and plants to serve us all;
That they may bring forth food from the earth,*
 and wine to gladden our hearts,
Oil to make a cheerful countenance,*
 and bread to strengthen the heart.
The trees of the Lord are full of sap,*
 the cedars of Lebanon which he planted,
In which the birds build their nests,*
 and in whose tops the stork makes his dwelling.
The high hills are a refuge for the mountain goats,*
 and the stony cliffs for the rock badgers.
You appointed the moon to mark the seasons,*
 and the sun knows the time of its setting.
You make darkness that it may be night,*
 in which all the beasts of the forest prowl.
The lions roar after their prey*
 and seek their food from God.
The sun rises and they slip away*
 and lay themselves down in their dens.
The labourer goes forth to work*
 and to toil until the evening.
O Lord, how manifold are your works!*
 in wisdom you have made them all;
   the earth is full of your creatures.
Yonder is the great and wide sea
   with its living things too many to number,*
 creatures both small and great.
There move the ships,
   and there is that Leviathan,*
 which you have made for the sport of it.
All of them look to you*
 to give them their food in due season.
You give it to them, they gather it;*
 you open your hand and they are filled with good things.
You hide your face and they are terrified;*
 you take away their breath
   and they die and return to their dust.
You send forth your Spirit and they are created;*
 and so you renew the face of the earth.
May the glory of the Lord endure for ever;*
 may the Lord rejoice in all his works.
He looks at the earth and it trembles;*
 he touches the mountains and they smoke.
I will sing to the Lord as long as I live;*
 I will praise my God while I have my being.
May these words of mine please him;*
 I will rejoice in the Lord.
Let sinners be consumed out of the earth,*
 and the wicked be no more.
Bless the Lord, O my soul.*
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 39]:

The Lord continued his reply to Job:
'Do you know when the mountain goats give birth?
   Do you observe the calving of the deer? 
Can you number the months that they fulfil,
   and do you know the time when they give birth, 
when they crouch to give birth to their offspring,
   and are delivered of their young? 
Their young ones become strong, they grow up in the open;
   they go forth, and do not return to them. 

'Who has let the wild ass go free?
   Who has loosed the bonds of the swift ass, 
to which I have given the steppe for its home,
   the salt land for its dwelling-place? 
It scorns the tumult of the city;
   it does not hear the shouts of the driver. 
It ranges the mountains as its pasture,
   and it searches after every green thing. 

'Is the wild ox willing to serve you?
   Will it spend the night at your crib? 
Can you tie it in the furrow with ropes,
   or will it harrow the valleys after you? 
Will you depend on it because its strength is great,
   and will you hand over your labour to it? 
Do you have faith in it that it will return,
   and bring your grain to your threshing-floor? 

'The ostrich's wings flap wildly,
   though its pinions lack plumage. 
For it leaves its eggs to the earth,
   and lets them be warmed on the ground, 
forgetting that a foot may crush them,
   and that a wild animal may trample them. 
It deals cruelly with its young, as if they were not its own;
   though its labour should be in vain, yet it has no fear; 
because God has made it forget wisdom,
   and given it no share in understanding. 
When it spreads its plumes aloft,
   it laughs at the horse and its rider. 

'Do you give the horse its might?
   Do you clothe its neck with mane? 
Do you make it leap like the locust?
   Its majestic snorting is terrible. 
It paws violently, exults mightily;
   it goes out to meet the weapons. 
It laughs at fear, and is not dismayed;
   it does not turn back from the sword. 
Upon it rattle the quiver,
   the flashing spear, and the javelin. 
With fierceness and rage it swallows the ground;
   it cannot stand still at the sound of the trumpet. 
When the trumpet sounds, it says “Aha!”
   From a distance it smells the battle,
   the thunder of the captains, and the shouting.  

'Is it by your wisdom that the hawk soars,
   and spreads its wings towards the south? 
Is it at your command that the eagle mounts up
   and makes its nest on high? 
It lives on the rock and makes its home
   in the fastness of the rocky crag. 
>From there it spies the prey;
   its eyes see it from far away. 
Its young ones suck up blood;
   and where the slain are, there it is.' 

HYMN 
Words: George Body (1840-1911)
Tune: King Alfred (7777 77)

Jesu! speak to me in love,
Restless, storm-toss'd in my sin;
With Thy mighty voice, O Lord
Thy great calm create within;
Bid the stormy winds to cease,
Bid, O bid me go in peace.

To Thee, Jesu, do I fly,
Waken'd from my soul's dread sleep;
None but Thou can save me, Lord,
In this hour of anguish deep;
Thou alone canst give release,
Bid, O bid me go in peace.

Weeping at Thy feet I fall,
Wearied, burden'd, lonely, sad;
Thou dost bid me come, my Lord,
Thou alone canst make me glad;
Jesu, grant my soul release,
Bid, O bid me go in peace.

Boldly at Thy throne of grace,
Lord, I now forgiveness seek;
In Thy tender, pitying love
To my soul Thy pardon speak.
Jesu! make my anguish cease,
Bid, O bid me go in peace.

Prince of Peace! Who in Thy death
Didst for me the ransom pay,
Cleanse me in Thy precious blood,
Give to me Thy peace today.
Now, Lord, grant my soul release,
Now, Lord, bid me go in peace.

SECOND READING [Luke 7.36–end]:

One of the Pharisees asked Jesus to eat with him, and he went into the Pharisee's house and took his place at the table. And a woman in the city, who was a sinner, having learned that he was eating in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster jar of ointment. She stood behind him at his feet, weeping, and began to bathe his feet with her tears and to dry them with her hair. Then she continued kissing his feet and anointing them with the ointment. Now when the Pharisee who had invited him saw it, he said to himself, 'If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what kind of woman this is who is touching him—that she is a sinner.' Jesus spoke up and said to him, 'Simon, I have something to say to you.' 'Teacher,' he replied, 'speak.' 'A certain creditor had two debtors; one owed five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. When they could not pay, he cancelled the debts for both of them. Now which of them will love him more?' Simon answered, 'I suppose the one for whom he cancelled the greater debt.' And Jesus said to him, 'You have judged rightly.' Then turning towards the woman, he said to Simon, 'Do you see this woman? I entered your house; you gave me no water for my feet, but she has bathed my feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but from the time I came in she has not stopped kissing my feet. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. Therefore, I tell you, her sins, which were many, have been forgiven; hence she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.' Then he said to her, 'Your sins are forgiven.' But those who were at the table with him began to say among themselves, 'Who is this who even forgives sins?' And he said to the woman, 'Your faith has saved you; go in peace.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Creator and Sustainer of life, God,
who ever calls us back
to his ways of justice and peace:
we thank you for the gift of the land,
for its beauty, and its resources,
and the rich heritage we enjoy.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

And so we pray:
for those who make decisions about our land and its resources;
for those who work on the land and sea, 
in our cities, and in commerce and industry;
for artists, scientists, politicians, and visionaries.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

We thank you for giving us life, and for giving us our life together.
We pray for all who through their own or others( actions
are deprived of fullness of life;
for all who know sickness, disability, and an untimely death;
for all who devote their lives to ministering to the needs of others.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

Give us reverence for life in this, your created world.
May we reflect the goodness of your creation
in the society we create with and for one another.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

Pour out upon us, O God, 
the power and wisdom of your Spirit, 
that we may walk with Christ the way of the cross,
ready to offer even the gift of our lives 
to show forth to the world our hope in your kingdom. 
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, 
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, 
one God, forever and ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Trinity of love,
fill us with the bonds of mutual care,
that our relatedness may be reborn
in justice, mercy and peace.  Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is based on a prayer by Laurence Hull Stookey. The closing sentence is based on a prayer from Prayers for an Inclusive Church. The intercession is by David Bromell.



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