OREMUS: 27 July 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Jul 26 17:00:01 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for July 27
William Reed Huntington, Priest, 1909

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, holy God,
you alone are holy, you alone are God. 
The universe declares your praise: 
beyond the stars; beneath the sea; 
within each cell; with every breath. 
Generations bless your faithfulness: 
through the water; by night and day; 
across the wilderness; out of exile; into the future. 
We give you thanks for your dear Son: 
at the heart of human life; 
near to those who suffer; 
beside the sinner; among the poor; with us now. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you, 
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 120

When I was in trouble I called to the Lord,*
 I called to the Lord and he answered me.
Deliver me, O Lord, from lying lips*
 and from the deceitful tongue.
What shall be done to you and what more besides,*
 O you deceitful tongue?
The sharpened arrows of a warrior,*
 along with hot glowing coals.
How hateful it is that I must lodge in Meshech*
 and dwell among the tents of Kedar!
Too long have I had to live*
 among the enemies of peace.
I am on the side of peace,*

 but when I speak of it, they are for war.

Psalm 121

I lift up my eyes to the hills;*
 from where is my help to come?
My help comes from the Lord,*
 the maker of heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved*
 and he who watches over you will not fall asleep.
Behold, he who keeps watch over Israel*
 shall neither slumber nor sleep;
The Lord himself watches over you;*
 the Lord is your shade at your right hand,
So that the sun shall not strike you by day,*
 nor the moon by night.
The Lord shall preserve you from all evil;*
 it is he who shall keep you safe.
The Lord shall watch over your going out
   and your coming in,*
 from this time forth for evermore.

Psalm 122

I was glad when they said to me,*
 'Let us go to the house of the Lord.'
Now our feet are standing*
 within your gates, O Jerusalem.
Jerusalem is built as a city*
 that is at unity with itself.
To which the tribes go up, the tribes of the Lord,*
 the assembly of Israel, to praise the name of the Lord.
For there are the thrones of judgement,*
 the thrones of the house of David.
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:*
 'May they prosper who love you.
'Peace be within your walls*
 and quietness within your towers.
'For my family and companions' sake,*
 I pray for your prosperity.
'Because of the house of the Lord our God,*
 I will seek to do you good.'

Psalm 123

To you I lift up my eyes,*
 to you enthroned in the heavens.
As the eyes of servants look to the hand of their masters,*
 and the eyes of a maid to the hand of her mistress,
So our eyes look to the Lord our God,*
 until he show us his mercy.
Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy,*
 for we have had more than enough of contempt,
Too much of the scorn of the indolent rich,*
 and of the derision of the proud.

Psalm 124

If the Lord had not been on our side,*
 let Israel now say;
If the Lord had not been on our side,*
 when enemies rose up against us;
Then would they have swallowed us up alive*
 in their fierce anger towards us;
Then would the waters have overwhelmed us*
 and the torrent gone over us;
Then would the raging waters*
 have gone right over us.
Blessed be the Lord!*
 he has not given us over to be a prey for their teeth.
We have escaped like a bird
   from the snare of the fowler;*
 the snare is broken and we have escaped.
Our help is in the name of the Lord,*
 the maker of heaven and earth.

Psalm 125

Those who trust in the Lord are like Mount Zion,*
 which cannot be moved, but stands fast for ever.
The hills stand about Jerusalem;*
 so does the Lord stand round about his people,
   from this time forth for evermore.
The sceptre of the wicked shall not hold sway
   over the land allotted to the just,*
 so that the just shall not put their hands to evil.
Show your goodness, O Lord, to those who are good*
 and to those who are true of heart.
As for those who turn aside to crooked ways,
   the Lord will lead them away with the evildoers;*
 but peace be upon Israel.

FIRST READING [Habakkuk 1.1–11]:

The oracle that the prophet Habakkuk saw. 

O Lord, how long shall I cry for help,
   and you will not listen?
Or cry to you ‘Violence!’
   and you will not save? 
Why do you make me see wrongdoing
   and look at trouble?
Destruction and violence are before me;
   strife and contention arise. 
So the law becomes slack
   and justice never prevails.
The wicked surround the righteous—
   therefore judgement comes forth perverted. 

Look at the nations, and see!
   Be astonished! Be astounded!
For a work is being done in your days
   that you would not believe if you were told. 
For I am rousing the Chaldeans,
   that fierce and impetuous nation,
who march through the breadth of the earth
   to seize dwellings not their own. 
Dread and fearsome are they;
   their justice and dignity proceed from themselves. 
Their horses are swifter than leopards,
   more menacing than wolves at dusk;
   their horses charge.
Their horsemen come from far away;
   they fly like an eagle swift to devour. 
They all come for violence,
   with faces pressing forward;
   they gather captives like sand. 
At kings they scoff,
   and of rulers they make sport.
They laugh at every fortress,
   and heap up earth to take it. 
Then they sweep by like the wind;
   they transgress and become guilty;
   their own might is their god! 

HYMN 
Words: John Keble (1792-1866)
Tune: Winchester Old, Stroudwater

When God of old came down from heaven,
in power and wrath he came;
before his feet the clouds were riven,
half darkness and half flame.

Around the trembling mountain's base
the prostrate people lay;
a day of wrath, and not of grace,
a dim and dreadful day. 

But when he came the second time,
he came in power and love;
softer than gale at morning prime
hovered his holy dove. 

The fires, that rushed on Sinai down
in sudden torrents dread,
now gently light, a glorious crown,
on every sainted head. 

And as on Israel's awestruck ear
the voice exceeding loud,
the trump that angels quake to hear,
thrilled from the deep, dark cloud; 

So, when the Spirit of our God
came down his flock to find,
a voice from heaven was heard abroad,
a rushing mighty wind. 

It fills the Church of God; it fills
the sinful world around:
only in stubborn hearts and wills
no place for it is found. 

Come, Lord, come Wisdom, Love and Power,
open our ears to hear;
let us not miss the accepted hour:
save, Lord, by love or fear.

SECOND READING [Mark 1.14–20]:

Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, 'The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.' 

As Jesus passed along the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the lake—for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, 'Follow me and I will make you fish for people.' And immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John, who were in their boat mending the nets. Immediately he called them; and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men, and followed him. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Eternal God, we rejoice today in the gift of life, which
we have received by your grace, and the new life you give
in Jesus Christ. Especially we thank you for
     the love of our families...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     the affection of our friends...
     strength and abilities to serve your purpose today...
     this community in which we live...
     opportunities to give as we have received...

God of grace, we offer our prayers for the needs of
others and commit ourselves to serve them as we have been
served in Jesus Christ. Especially we pray for
     those closest to us, families, friends, neighbors...
                         (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     refugees and homeless men, women and children...
     the outcast and persecuted...
     those from whom we are estranged...
     the church in Africa... 

Almighty God, 
whose most dear Son went not up to joy but first he suffered pain, 
and entered not into glory before he was crucified: 
Mercifully grant that we, walking in the way of the cross, 
may find it none other than the way of life and peace; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O Lord our God, 
we thank you for instilling in the heart 
of your servant William Reed Huntington 
a fervent love for your Church 
and its mission in the world; 
and we pray that, with unflagging faith in your promises, 
we may make known to all people 
your blessed gift of eternal life; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

United us in mutual love across the barriers of race and culture, O God,
and strengthen us in our common task of being Christ
and showing Christ to the world he came to save. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The first collect is by William Reed Huntington. The closing sentence is by John Kingsworth. The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

Huntington was born in Lowell, Massachusetts in 1838, studied at Harvard, and was ordained a priest in 1862. In each of the thirteen General Conventions of the Episcopal Church that met between 1870 and his death, he was a leader in the House of Deputies. In 1871 he moved for the restoration of the ancient Order of Deaconesses, finally officially authorized in 1889. Huntington's was the chief voice calling for a revision of the Book of Common Prayer (completed in 1892). In his book The Church Idea (1870), Huntington undertook to discuss the basis of Christian unity, and he formulated what became known as the Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral, adopted by the bishops of the worldwide Anglican Communion assembled at Lambeth in 1888. The statement set forth four principles which Anglicans regard as essential, and offer as a basis for discussion of union with other Christian bodies. [James Kiefer]



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