OREMUS: 13 July 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Jul 12 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for July 13

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Almighty God,
to whom, through whom and by whom
all things have their being, 
may praise and honour ever be given
to your great and glorious Name. 
You alone are the one true God, 
Maker of heaven and earth. 
We acknowledge you as Creator
of the invisible orders of the world, 
as well as the visible wonders of the universe, 
the deepest mysteries of time and of space, 
the redeeming purposes of this life and the life to come. 
May the greatness of your being and power
be honoured and praised now and for evermore. 
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 68 [CCP]

Let God arise and let his enemies be scattered;*
 let those who hate him flee before him. 
Let them vanish like smoke
   when the wind drives it away;*
 as the wax melts at the fire,
   so let the wicked perish at the presence of God.
But let the righteous be glad and rejoice before God;*
 let them also be merry and joyful.
Sing to God, sing praises to his name;
   exalt him who rides upon the heavens;*
 Yahweh is his name, rejoice before him!
Father of orphans, defender of widows,*
 God in his holy habitation!
God gives the solitary a home

   and brings forth prisoners into freedom;*
 but the rebels shall live in dry places.
O God, when you went forth before your people,*
 when you marched through the wilderness,
The earth shook and the skies poured down rain,
   at the presence of God, the God of Sinai,*
 at the presence of God, the God of Israel.
You sent a gracious rain, O God, upon your inheritance;*
 you refreshed the land when it was weary.
Your people found their home in it;*
 in your goodness, O God,
   you have made provision for the poor.
The Lord gave the word;*
 great was the company of women who bore the tidings:
'Kings with their armies are fleeing away;*
 the women at home are dividing the spoils.'
Though you lingered among the sheepfolds,*
 you shall be like a dove
   whose wings are covered with silver,
   whose feathers are like green gold.
When the Almighty scattered kings,*
 it was like snow falling in Zalmon.
O mighty mountain, O hill of Bashan!*
 O rugged mountain, O hill of Bashan!
Why do you look with envy, O rugged mountain,
   at the hill which God chose for his resting place?*
 truly, the Lord will dwell there for ever.
The chariots of God are twenty thousand,
   even thousands of thousands;*
 the Lord comes in holiness from Sinai.
You have gone up on high and led captivity captive;
   you have received gifts even from your enemies,*
 that the Lord God might dwell among them.
Blessed be the Lord day by day,*
 the God of our salvation, who bears our burdens.
He is our God, the God of our salvation;*
 God is the Lord, by whom we escape death.
Your procession is seen, O God,*
 your procession into the sanctuary, my God and my King.
The singers go before, musicians follow after,*
 in the midst of maidens playing upon the handdrums.
Bless God in the congregation;*
 bless the Lord, you that are of the fountain of Israel.
There is Benjamin, least of the tribes, at the head;
   the princes of Judah in a company;*
 and the princes of Zebulon and Naphtali.
Send forth your strength, O God;*
 establish, O God, what you have wrought for us.
Kings shall bring gifts to you,*
 for your temple's sake at Jerusalem.
Rebuke the wild beast of the reeds,*
 and the peoples, a herd of wild bulls with its calves.
Trample down those who lust after silver;*
 scatter the peoples that delight in war.
Let tribute be brought out of Egypt;*
 let Ethiopia stretch out her hands to God.
Sing to God, O kingdoms of the earth;*
 sing praises to the Lord.
He rides in the heavens, the ancient heavens;*
 he sends forth his voice, his mighty voice.
Ascribe power to God;*
 his majesty is over Israel;
   his strength is in the skies.
How wonderful is God in his holy places!*
 the God of Israel giving strength and power to his people!
   Blessed be God!

FIRST READING [Jeremiah 41]:

In the seventh month, Ishmael son of Nethaniah son of Elishama, of the royal family, one of the chief officers of the king, came with ten men to Gedaliah son of Ahikam, at Mizpah. As they ate bread together there at Mizpah, Ishmael son of Nethaniah and the ten men with him got up and struck down Gedaliah son of Ahikam son of Shaphan with the sword and killed him, because the king of Babylon had appointed him governor in the land. Ishmael also killed all the Judeans who were with Gedaliah at Mizpah, and the Chaldean soldiers who happened to be there. 

On the day after the murder of Gedaliah, before anyone knew of it, eighty men arrived from Shechem and Shiloh and Samaria, with their beards shaved and their clothes torn, and their bodies gashed, bringing grain-offerings and incense to present at the temple of the Lord. And Ishmael son of Nethaniah came out from Mizpah to meet them, weeping as he came. As he met them, he said to them, 'Come to Gedaliah son of Ahikam.' When they reached the middle of the city, Ishmael son of Nethaniah and the men with him slaughtered them, and threw them into a cistern. But there were ten men among them who said to Ishmael, 'Do not kill us, for we have stores of wheat, barley, oil, and honey hidden in the fields.' So he refrained, and did not kill them along with their companions. 

Now the cistern into which Ishmael had thrown all the bodies of the men whom he had struck down was the large cistern that King Asa had made for defence against King Baasha of Israel; Ishmael son of Nethaniah filled that cistern with those whom he had killed. Then Ishmael took captive all the rest of the people who were in Mizpah, the king's daughters and all the people who were left at Mizpah, whom Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, had committed to Gedaliah son of Ahikam. Ishmael son of Nethaniah took them captive and set out to cross over to the Ammonites. 

But when Johanan son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces with him heard of all the crimes that Ishmael son of Nethaniah had done, they took all their men and went to fight against Ishmael son of Nethaniah. They came upon him at the great pool that is in Gibeon. And when all the people who were with Ishmael saw Johanan son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces with him, they were glad. So all the people whom Ishmael had carried away captive from Mizpah turned and came back, and went to Johanan son of Kareah. But Ishmael son of Nethaniah escaped from Johanan with eight men, and went to the Ammonites. Then Johanan son of Kareah and all the leaders of the forces with him took all the rest of the people whom Ishmael son of Nethaniah had carried away captive from Mizpah after he had slain Gedaliah son of Ahikam—soldiers, women, children, and eunuchs, whom Johanan brought back from Gibeon. And they set out, and stopped at Geruth Chimham near Bethlehem, intending to go to Egypt because of the Chaldeans; for they were afraid of them, because Ishmael son of Nethaniah had killed Gedaliah son of Ahikam, whom the king of Babylon had made governor over the land. 

HYMN 
Words: Anne Brontë (1820-1849)
Tune: Carlisle, Potsdam, St Michael, St Thomas, Silchester

Believe not those who say
The upward path is smooth,
Lest thou shouldst stumble in the way
And faint before the truth.

It is the only road
Unto the realms of joy;
But he who seeks that blest abode
Must all his powers employ.

Arm, arm thee for the fight!
Cast useless loads away;
Watch through the darkest hours of night;
Toil through the hottest day.

To labour and to love,
To pardon and endure,
To lift thy heart to God above
And keep thy conscience pure;

Be this thy constant aim,
Thy hope, thy chief delight;
What matter who should whisper blame,
Or who should scorn or slight;

If but thy God approve,
And if, within thy breast,
Thou feel the comfort of his love,
The earnest of his rest.

SECOND READING [2 Corinthians 11.16–end]:

I repeat, let no one think that I am a fool; but if you do, then accept me as a fool, so that I too may boast a little. What I am saying in regard to this boastful confidence, I am saying not with the Lord’s authority, but as a fool; since many boast according to human standards, I will also boast. For you gladly put up with fools, being wise yourselves! For you put up with it when someone makes slaves of you, or preys upon you, or takes advantage of you, or puts on airs, or gives you a slap in the face. To my shame, I must say, we were too weak for that!

But whatever anyone dares to boast of—I am speaking as a fool—I also dare to boast of that. Are they Hebrews? So am I. Are they Israelites? So am I. Are they descendants of Abraham? So am I. Are they ministers of Christ? I am talking like a madman—I am a better one: with far greater labours, far more imprisonments, with countless floggings, and often near death. Five times I have received from the Jews the forty lashes minus one. Three times I was beaten with rods. Once I received a stoning. Three times I was shipwrecked; for a night and a day I was adrift at sea; on frequent journeys, in danger from rivers, danger from bandits, danger from my own people, danger from Gentiles, danger in the city, danger in the wilderness, danger at sea, danger from false brothers and sisters; in toil and hardship, through many a sleepless night, hungry and thirsty, often without food, cold and naked. And, besides other things, I am under daily pressure because of my anxiety for all the churches. Who is weak, and I am not weak? Who is made to stumble, and I am not indignant? 

If I must boast, I will boast of the things that show my weakness. The God and Father of the Lord Jesus (blessed be he for ever!) knows that I do not lie. In Damascus, the governor under King Aretas set a guard on the city of Damascus in order to seize me, but I was let down in a basket through a window in the wall, and escaped from his hands. 
 
The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray for our own needs and for the needs of others,
following the pattern which Jesus gave
when he taught us to pray to God our Father.

Through our love of the countryside,
through our care for animals,
through our respect for property and tools,
Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name.

On our farms and in our homes,
in our colleges and schools,
where machinery is made, and where policy is planned,
Father, your kingdom come.

By our seeking your guidance,
by our keeping your commandments,
by our living true to our consciences,
Father, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

For the millions who live in poverty and hunger,
for our own needs, and the requirements of our neighbours,
by cooperation, sympathy, and generosity,
Give us today our daily bread.

Because we have broken your commandments, 
doing what we ought not to do,
and neglecting what we ought to do,
Forgive us our sins.

If any have injured us by injustice, double dealing or exploitation,
We forgive those who sin against us.

When prosperity lulls us to false security, 
or adversity prompts us to despair,
when success makes us boastful, 
or failure makes us bitter,
Save us from the time of trial, and deliver us from evil.

In the assurance of faith,
in the confidence of hope,
in the will to serve,
help us to love Christ as Lord, 
and our neighbour as ourselves.
For the kingdom, the power, 
and the glory are yours now and for ever. Amen.

God our Freedom,
who raised Christ from the dead
to be the promise and the first fruits
of your Spirit dwelling within us;
set our minds on that same Spirit,
so that your word may take root in our hearts
and flourish unhindered
in lives that bear fruit with works of love.
We ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Lord, look kindly on us,
and grant us an increase in holiness and grace. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is from the Church of Scotland. The collect and the closing sentence are by Alan Griffiths.



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