OREMUS: 22 January 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Jan 21 17:00:00 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for January 22
Vincent of Saragossa, Deacon, first Martyr of Spain, 304

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Lord our God:
in your love you create all things out of nothing
through your eternal Word. 
In your love you redeemed the world
through our Lord Jesus Christ. 
In your love you empower your people
through the gift of your Holy Spirit. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you: 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit: 
Blessed be God forever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 107

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good,*
 and his mercy endures for ever.
Let all those whom the Lord has redeemed proclaim*
 that he redeemed them from the hand of the foe.
He gathered them out of the lands;*
 from the east and from the west,
   from the north and from the south.
Some wandered in desert wastes;*
 they found no way to a city where they might dwell.
They were hungry and thirsty;*
 their spirits languished within them.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He put their feet on a straight path*
 to go to a city where they might dwell.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he satisfies the thirsty*
 and fills the hungry with good things.
Some sat in darkness and deep gloom,*
 bound fast in misery and iron;
Because they rebelled against the words of God*
 and despised the counsel of the Most High.
So he humbled their spirits with hard labour;*
 they stumbled and there was none to help.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He led them out of darkness and deep gloom*
 and broke their bonds asunder.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he shatters the doors of bronze*
 and breaks in two the iron bars.
Some were fools and took to rebellious ways;*
 they were afflicted because of their sins.
They abhorred all manner of food*
 and drew near to death's door.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He sent forth his word and healed them*
 and saved them from the grave.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them offer a sacrifice of thanksgiving*
 and tell of his acts with shouts of joy.
Some went down to the sea in ships*
 and plied their trade in deep waters;
They beheld the works of the Lord*
 and his wonders in the deep.
Then he spoke and a stormy wind arose,*
 which tossed high the waves of the sea.
They mounted up to the heavens
   and fell back to the depths;*
 their hearts melted because of their peril.
They reeled and staggered like drunkards*
 and were at their wits' end.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He stilled the storm to a whisper*
 and quieted the waves of the sea.
Then were they glad because of the calm,*
 and he brought them
   to the harbour they were bound for.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them exalt him in the congregation of the people*
 and praise him in the council of the elders.
The Lord changed rivers into deserts,*
 and watersprings into thirsty ground,
A fruitful land into salt flats,*
 because of the wickedness of those who dwell there.
He changed deserts into pools of water*
 and dry land into watersprings.
He settled the hungry there,*
 and they founded a city to dwell in.
They sowed fields and planted vineyards,*
 and brought in a fruitful harvest.
He blessed them, so that they increased greatly;*
 he did not let their herds decrease.
Yet when they were diminished and brought low,*
 through stress of adversity and sorrow,
He lifted up the poor out of misery*
 and multiplied their families like flocks of sheep.
He pours contempt on princes*
 and makes them wander in trackless wastes.
The upright will see this and rejoice,*
 but all wickedness will shut its mouth.
Whoever is wise will ponder these things,*
 and consider well the mercies of the Lord.

FIRST READING [Joel 2:1–17]:

Blow the trumpet in Zion;
   sound the alarm on my holy mountain!
Let all the inhabitants of the land tremble,
   for the day of the Lord is coming, it is near— 
a day of darkness and gloom,
   a day of clouds and thick darkness!
Like blackness spread upon the mountains
   a great and powerful army comes;
their like has never been from of old,
   nor will be again after them
   in ages to come. 

Fire devours in front of them,
   and behind them a flame burns.
Before them the land is like the garden of Eden,
   but after them a desolate wilderness,
   and nothing escapes them. 

They have the appearance of horses,
   and like warhorses they charge. 
As with the rumbling of chariots,
   they leap on the tops of the mountains,
like the crackling of a flame of fire
   devouring the stubble,
like a powerful army
   drawn up for battle. 

Before them peoples are in anguish,
   all faces grow pale. 
Like warriors they charge,
   like soldiers they scale the wall.
Each keeps to its own course,
   they do not swerve from their paths. 
They do not jostle one another,
   each keeps to its own track;
they burst through the weapons
   and are not halted. 
They leap upon the city,
   they run upon the walls;
they climb up into the houses,
   they enter through the windows like a thief. 

The earth quakes before them,
   the heavens tremble.
The sun and the moon are darkened,
   and the stars withdraw their shining. 
The Lord utters his voice
   at the head of his army;
how vast is his host!
   Numberless are those who obey his command.
Truly the day of the Lord is great;
   terrible indeed—who can endure it? 

Yet even now, says the Lord,
   return to me with all your heart,
with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning; 
   rend your hearts and not your clothing.
Return to the Lord, your God,
   for he is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love,
   and relents from punishing. 
Who knows whether he will not turn and relent,
   and leave a blessing behind him,
a grain-offering and a drink-offering
   for the Lord, your God? 

Blow the trumpet in Zion;
   sanctify a fast;
call a solemn assembly; 
   gather the people.
Sanctify the congregation;
   assemble the aged;
gather the children,
   even infants at the breast.
Let the bridegroom leave his room,
   and the bride her canopy. 

Between the vestibule and the altar
   let the priests, the ministers of the Lord, weep.
Let them say, 'Spare your people, O Lord,
   and do not make your heritage a mockery,
   a byword among the nations.
Why should it be said among the peoples,
   "Where is their God?" ' 

HYMN 
Words: Edwin Hatch (1835-89)
Tune: Carlisle, Dominica, St. George (Gauntlett)

Breathe on me, Breath of God
fill me with life anew,
that I may love what thou dost love,
and do what thou wouldst do.

Breathe on me, Breath of God,
until my heart is pure;
until with thee I will one will,
to do and to endure.

Breathe on me, Breath of God,
till I am wholly thine;
until this earthly part of me
glows with thy fire divine.

Breathe on me, Breath of God:
so shall I never die,
but live with thee the perfect life
of thine eternity.

SECOND READING [Romans 11:1–24]:

I ask, then, has God rejected his people? By no means! I myself am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham, a member of the tribe of Benjamin. God has not rejected his people whom he foreknew. Do you not know what the scripture says of Elijah, how he pleads with God against Israel? 'Lord, they have killed your prophets, they have demolished your altars; I alone am left, and they are seeking my life.' But what is the divine reply to him? 'I have kept for myself seven thousand who have not bowed the knee to Baal.' So too at the present time there is a remnant, chosen by grace. But if it is by grace, it is no longer on the basis of works, otherwise grace would no longer be grace. 

What then? Israel failed to obtain what it was seeking. The elect obtained it, but the rest were hardened, as it is written,
'God gave them a sluggish spirit,
   eyes that would not see
   and ears that would not hear,
down to this very day.' 
And David says,
'Let their table become a snare and a trap,
   a stumbling-block and a retribution for them; 
let their eyes be darkened so that they cannot see,
   and keep their backs for ever bent.' 

So I ask, have they stumbled so as to fall? By no means! But through their stumbling salvation has come to the Gentiles, so as to make Israel jealous. Now if their stumbling means riches for the world, and if their defeat means riches for Gentiles, how much more will their full inclusion mean! 

Now I am speaking to you Gentiles. Inasmuch then as I am an apostle to the Gentiles, I glorify my ministry in order to make my own people jealous, and thus save some of them. For if their rejection is the reconciliation of the world, what will their acceptance be but life from the dead! If the part of the dough offered as first fruits is holy, then the whole batch is holy; and if the root is holy, then the branches also are holy. 

But if some of the branches were broken off, and you, a wild olive shoot, were grafted in their place to share the rich root of the olive tree, do not vaunt yourselves over the branches. If you do vaunt yourselves, remember that it is not you that support the root, but the root that supports you. You will say, 'Branches were broken off so that I might be grafted in.' That is true. They were broken off because of their unbelief, but you stand only through faith. So do not become proud, but stand in awe. For if God did not spare the natural branches, perhaps he will not spare you. Note then the kindness and the severity of God: severity towards those who have fallen, but God's kindness towards you, provided you continue in his kindness; otherwise you also will be cut off. And even those of Israel, if they do not persist in unbelief, will be grafted in, for God has the power to graft them in again. For if you have been cut from what is by nature a wild olive tree and grafted, contrary to nature, into a cultivated olive tree, how much more will these natural branches be grafted back into their own olive tree. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Faithful God, Lord of all,
we offer our prayers to you
for a world in need.

Lord of the Church, we pray for your people throughout the world,
especially in the Diocese of
Give unity in the Spirit
that we may be one in the witness of saving love
and glorify you with one mind and mouth.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Head of the Body,
give us wisdom to follow your commandments,
to live peacefully and do justly,
and to walk humbly with you.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Creator and ruler of the universe,
give to all who exercise authority
wisdom and virtue to govern justly
and bring peace across the land.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Source of all compassion,
give to all who suffer
the light of your presence and the caring of your people,
to bring calm and comfort.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Giver of good to all,
take from us any evil thought or will
that we may forgive those who offend us or seek our harm
as you have forgiven us.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

All-knowing One, you who see us as we are
and know us as we should be:
forgive our sins, set us free from fear,
and give us lives abundant with your guiding presence,
that we may be yours for ever,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God, whose deacon Vincent, upheld by you, was not terrified by threats nor overcome by torments: Strengthen us to endure all adversity with invincible and steadfast faith; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

The steadfast love of God
draw us close in a loving embrace.
The transforming power of Christ
free us for courageous service.
The binding gift of the Holy Spirit remind us
of the grace of God. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is from the Methodist Worship Book and the closing sentence is from _Uniting in Worship_, The Uniting Church in Australia.

The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

Vincent was born in Saragossa in Aragon in the latter part of the third century and was ordained to the diaconate by Valerian, his bishop in that city. When the Diocletian persecutions began, both men were brought before the Roman governor but, because Valerian stammered badly, he relied on Vincent to speak for them both. Vincent spoke eloquently for both his bishop and his church, proclaiming the good news of Jesus Christ and condemning paganism. He so angered the governor that he was immediately condemned to a painful death, reputedly on the gridiron. Thus he lived and gave his life in the tradition of Stephen, the first martyr and also a deacon; he died in the year 304 and his feast has been celebrated on this day since the persecutions ended in 312. [Exciting Holiness]


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