OREMUS: 24 August 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Aug 23 22:21:45 GMT 2011


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OREMUS for August 24
Saint Bartholomew the Apostle

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God of mystery,
for your servant Bartholomew, 
the apostle whom we know only by name:
even though death and time will take away
the memory of our work and life,
our faith will remain always in your sight, O Lord.
For this and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 119:1-8

Happy are they whose way is blameless,*
 who walk in the law of the Lord!
Happy are they who observe his decrees*
 and seek him with all their hearts!
Who never do any wrong,*
 but always walk in his ways.
You laid down your commandments,*
 that we should fully keep them.
O that my ways were made so direct*
 that I might keep your statutes!
Then I should not be put to shame,*
 when I regard all your commandments.
I will thank you with an unfeigned heart,*
 when I have learned your righteous judgements.
I will keep your statutes;*
 do not utterly forsake me.
How shall the young cleanse their way?*
 By keeping to your words.
With my whole heart I seek you;*
 let me not stray from your commandments.
I treasure your promise in my heart,*
 that I may not sin against you.
Blessed are you, O Lord;*
 instruct me in your statutes.
With my lips will I recite*
 all the judgements of your mouth.
I have taken greater delight in the way of your decrees*
 than in all manner of riches.
I will meditate on your commandments*
 and give attention to your ways.
My delight is in your statutes;*
 I will not forget your word.
Deal bountifully with your servant,*
 that I may live and keep your word.
Open my eyes, that I may see*
 the wonders of your law.
I am a stranger here on earth;*
 do not hide your commandments from me.
My soul is consumed at all times*
 with longing for your judgements.
You have rebuked the insolent;*
 cursed are they who stray from your commandments!
Turn from me shame and rebuke,*
 for I have kept your decrees.
Even though rulers sit and plot against me,*
 I will meditate on your statutes.
For your decrees are my delight,*
 and they are my counsellors.

My soul cleaves to the dust;*
 give me life according to your word.
I have confessed my ways and you answered me;*
 instruct me in your statutes.
Make me understand the way of your commandments,*
 that I may meditate on your marvellous works.
My soul melts away for sorrow;*
 strengthen me according to your word.
Take from me the way of lying;*
 let me find grace through your law.
I have chosen the way of faithfulness;*
 I have set your judgements before me.
I hold fast to your decrees;*
 O Lord, let me not be put to shame.
I will run the way of your commandments,*
 for you have set my heart at liberty.

FIRST READING [Esther 6.1–13]:

That night the king could not sleep, and he gave orders to bring the book of records, the annals, and they were read to the king. It was found written how Mordecai had told about Bigthana and Teresh, two of the king's eunuchs, who guarded the threshold, and who had conspired to assassinate King Ahasuerus. Then the king said, 'What honour or distinction has been bestowed on Mordecai for this?' The king's servants who attended him said, 'Nothing has been done for him.' The king said, 'Who is in the court?' Now Haman had just entered the outer court of the king's palace to speak to the king about having Mordecai hanged on the gallows that he had prepared for him. So the king's servants told him, 'Haman is there, standing in the court.' The king said, 'Let him come in.' So Haman came in, and the king said to him, 'What shall be done for the man whom the king wishes to honour?' Haman said to himself, 'Whom would the king wish to honour more than me?' So Haman said to the king, 'For the man whom the king wishes to honour, let royal robes be brought, which the king has worn, and a horse that the king has ridden, with a royal crown on its head. Let the robes and the horse be handed over to one of the king's most noble officials; let him robe the man whom the king wishes to honour, and let him conduct the man on horseback through the open square of the city, proclaiming before him: Thus shall it be done for the man whom the king wishes to honour." ' Then the king said to Haman, 'Quickly, take the robes and the horse, as you have said, and do so to the Jew Mordecai who sits at the king's gate. Leave out nothing that you have mentioned.' So Haman took the robes and the horse and robed Mordecai and led him riding through the open square of the city, proclaiming, 'Thus shall it be done for the man whom the king wishes to honour.' 
 Then Mordecai returned to the king's gate, but Haman hurried to his house, mourning and with his head covered. When Haman told his wife Zeresh and all his friends everything that had happened to him, his advisers and his wife Zeresh said to him, 'If Mordecai, before whom your downfall has begun, is of the Jewish people, you will not prevail against him, but will surely fall before him.' 

HYMN 
Words: Latin; trans. Richard Mant, 1837, as modified in Hymns Anicent & Modern 
Tune: Rex gloriose martyrum
Let all on earth their voices raise,
re-echoing heaven's triumphant praise,
to him who gave the apostles grace
to run on earth their glorious race.

Thou art whose word they bore the light
of Gospel truth o'er heathen night,
to us that heavenly light impart,
to glad our eyes and cheer our heart.

Thou art whose will to them was given
to bind and loose in earth and heaven,
our chains unbind, our sins undo,
and in our hearts thy grace renew.

Thou in whose might they spake the word
which cured disease and health restored,
to us its healing power prolong,
support the weak, confirm the strong.

And when the thrones are set on high,
and judgment's awful hour draws nigh,
then, Lord, with them pronounce us blessed,
and take us to thine endless rest.

SECOND READING [Acts 5:12-16]:

Now many signs and wonders were done among the people through the apostles. And they were all together in Solomon’s Portico. None of the rest dared to join them, but the people held them in high esteem. Yet more than ever believers were added to the Lord, great numbers of both men and women, so that they even carried out the sick into the streets, and laid them on cots and mats, in order that Peter’s shadow might fall on some of them as he came by. A great number of people would also gather from the towns around Jerusalem, bringing the sick and those tormented by unclean spirits, and they were all cured. 

The Benedictus (Morning),
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may
follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray to God, 
whose word was entrusted to the Apostles
and has spread to all the world.

Empower your Church
to proclaim the saving message of Jesus Christ.
Lord of mercy,
spread your word.

Give us courage and strength
to spread the Gospel in places
where it has not been preached.
Lord of mercy,
spread your word.

Bless us in our personal lives
that we may live fully according to Jesus' example.
Lord of mercy,
spread your word.

Open our eyes to your Word in the Holy Scriptures
that we find new paths of understanding.
Lord of mercy,
spread your word.

Remember, in your mercy, those who have gone before
marked with the sign of faith and led by the Gospel.
Lord of mercy,
spread your word.

Almighty and everlasting God, 
who gave to your apostle Bartholomew grace 
truly to believe and to preach your word:
grant that your Church
may love that word which he believed 
and may faithfully preach and receive the same;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ,
the love of God,
and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with us all. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating
Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis
1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is by Stephen Benner and is inspired
by a hymn by Jan Struther, 1931.

The intercession is by Stephen Benner and is inspired and uses a few phrases
from a prayer by Raymond Chapman in _Leading Intercessions_,
(c) 2000, Canterbury Press.

The collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the
Church of England_, material from which is included in this service
is copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

It has long been assumed that Bartholomew is the same as Nathanael though it is not a certainty. The gospels speak of Philip bringing Nathanael to Jesus and calling him an Israelite worthy of the name. He is also present beside the Sea of Galilee at the resurrection. Although he seems initially a somewhat cynical man, he recognises Jesus for who he is and proclaims him as Son of God and King of Israel. [Exciting Holiness]


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