OREMUS: 10 April 2011

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Apr 9 17:00:00 GMT 2011


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org
*******************************************************

OREMUS for April 10
William Law, Priest, Spiritual Writer, 1761

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, God of the covenant, 
long ago you embraced your people
and promised them your blessing. 
You called Abraham to trust your promise
and you gave him the faith to follow that call. 
You call us in our baptism to serve you, 
trusting that Christ will transform us
in the glory of the eternal Easter. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
<!
http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html
>

Psalm 53

The fool has said in his heart, 'There is no God.'*
 All are corrupt and commit abominable acts;
   there is none who does any good.
God looks down from heaven upon us all,*
 to see if there is any who is wise,
   if there is one who seeks after God.
Every one has proved faithless;
   all alike have turned bad;*
 there is none who does good; no, not one.
Have they no knowledge, those evildoers*
 who eat up my people like bread
   and do not call upon God?
See how greatly they tremble,
   such trembling as never was;*
 for God has scattered the bones of the enemy;
   they are put to shame, because God has rejected them.
O that Israel's deliverance would come out of Zion!*
 when God restores the fortunes of his people
   Jacob will rejoice and Israel be glad.

Psalm 54

Save me, O God, by your name;*
 in your might, defend my cause.
Hear my prayer, O God;*
 give ear to the words of my mouth.
For the arrogant have risen up against me,
   and the ruthless have sought my life,*
 those who have no regard for God.
Behold, God is my helper;*
 it is the Lord who sustains my life.
Render evil to those who spy on me;*
 in your faithfulness, destroy them.
I will offer you a freewill sacrifice*
 and praise your name, O Lord, for it is good.
For you have rescued me from every trouble,*
 and my eye has seen the ruin of my foes.

Psalm 55

Hear my prayer, O God;*
 do not hide yourself from my petition.
Listen to me and answer me;*
 I have no peace, because of my cares.
I am shaken by the noise of the enemy*
 and by the pressure of the wicked;
For they have cast an evil spell upon me*
 and are set against me in fury.
My heart quakes within me,*
 and the terrors of death have fallen upon me.
Fear and trembling have come over me,*
 and horror overwhelms me.
And I said, 'O that I had wings like a dove!*
 I would fly away and be at rest.
'I would flee to a faroff place*
 and make my lodging in the wilderness.
'I would hasten to escape*
 from the stormy wind and tempest.&#156;
Swallow them up, O Lord; confound their speech;*
 for I have seen violence and strife in the city.
Day and night the watch make their rounds upon her walls,*
 but trouble and misery are in the midst of her.
There is corruption at her heart;*
 her streets are never free of oppression and deceit.
For had it been an adversary who taunted me,
   then I could have borne it;*
 or had it been an enemy who vaunted himself against me,
   then I could have hidden from him.
But it was you, one after my own heart,*
 my companion, my own familiar friend.
We took sweet counsel together,*
 and walked with the throng in the house of God.
But I will call upon God,*
 and the Lord will deliver me.
In the evening, in the morning and at noonday
   I will complain and lament,*
 and he will hear my voice.
He will bring me safely back from the battle
   waged against me;*
 for there are many who fight me.
God, who is enthroned of old,
   will hear me and bring them down;*
 they never change; they do not fear God.
My companion stretched forth his hand against his comrade;*
 he has broken his covenant.
His speech is softer than butter,*
 but war is in his heart.
His words are smoother than oil,*
 but they are drawn swords.
Cast your burden upon the Lord and he will sustain you;*
 he will never let the righteous stumble.
For you will bring the bloodthirsty and deceitful*
 down to the pit of destruction, O God.
They shall not live out half their days,*
 but I will put my trust in you.

FIRST READING [Song of Solomon 5.2–6.3]:

I slept, but my heart was awake.
Listen! my beloved is knocking.
‘Open to me, my sister, my love,
   my dove, my perfect one;
for my head is wet with dew,
   my locks with the drops of the night.’ 
I had put off my garment;
   how could I put it on again?
I had bathed my feet;
   how could I soil them? 
My beloved thrust his hand into the opening,
   and my inmost being yearned for him. 
I arose to open to my beloved,
   and my hands dripped with myrrh,
my fingers with liquid myrrh,
   upon the handles of the bolt. 
I opened to my beloved,
   but my beloved had turned and was gone.
My soul failed me when he spoke.
I sought him, but did not find him;
   I called him, but he gave no answer. 
Making their rounds in the city
   the sentinels found me;
they beat me, they wounded me,
   they took away my mantle,
   those sentinels of the walls. 
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem,
   if you find my beloved,
tell him this:
   I am faint with love. 

What is your beloved more than another beloved,
   O fairest among women?
What is your beloved more than another beloved,
   that you thus adjure us? 

My beloved is all radiant and ruddy,
   distinguished among ten thousand. 
His head is the finest gold;
   his locks are wavy,
   black as a raven. 
His eyes are like doves
   beside springs of water,
bathed in milk,
   fitly set. 
His cheeks are like beds of spices,
   yielding fragrance.
His lips are lilies,
   distilling liquid myrrh. 
His arms are rounded gold,
   set with jewels.
His body is ivory work,
   encrusted with sapphires. 
His legs are alabaster columns,
   set upon bases of gold.
His appearance is like Lebanon,
   choice as the cedars. 
His speech is most sweet,
   and he is altogether desirable.
This is my beloved and this is my friend,
   O daughters of Jerusalem. 
Where has your beloved gone,
   O fairest among women?
Which way has your beloved turned,
   that we may seek him with you? 

My beloved has gone down to his garden,
   to the beds of spices,
to pasture his flock in the gardens,
   and to gather lilies. 
I am my beloved’s and my beloved is mine;
   he pastures his flock among the lilies. 

HYMN 
Words: Paulus Gerhardt (1607-1676) translated by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)
Tune: St. Theodulph

O Lord, how shall I meet Thee,
How welcome Thee aright?
Thy people long to greet Thee,
My hope, my heart's delight!
O kindle, Lord most holy,
Thy lamp within my breast,
To do, in spirit lowly,
All that may please Thee best.

Love caused Thine incarnation,
Love brought Thee down to me;
Thy thirst for my salvation
Procured my liberty.
O love beyond all telling,
That led Thee to embrace,
In love all love excelling,
Our lost and fallen race!

Rejoice, then, ye sad-hearted,
Who sit in deepest gloom,
Who mourn o'er joys departed,
And tremble at your doom.
Despair not, He is near you,
Yea, standing at the door,
Who best can help and cheer you,
And bids you weep no more.

Sin's debt, that fearful burden,
Let not your souls distress;
Your guilt the Lord will pardon,
And cover by His grace.
He comes, for men procuring
The peace of sin forgiven,
For all God's sons securing
Their heritage in heaven.

SECOND READING [Romans 8.1–11]:

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set you free from the law of sin and of death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do: by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and to deal with sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, so that the just requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit. For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit. To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. For this reason the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God; it does not submit to God’s law—indeed it cannot, and those who are in the flesh cannot please God. 

But you are not in the flesh; you are in the Spirit, since the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him. But if Christ is in you, though the body is dead because of sin, the Spirit is life because of righteousness. If the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised Christ from the dead will give life to your mortal bodies also through his Spirit that dwells in you. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Good Shepherd, within your embrace we are safe and secure. Within your embrace we know that we are precious in your sight. Within your embrace we feel the warmth of family and belonging. Within your embrace we grow and are nurtured together as one flock, the people of your pasture under your loving care and protection.
Come, let us bow down 
 Before the LORD our Maker.

Good Shepherd, within your embrace we find comfort and healing. We bring to you those who are weak, or struggling with physical, mental or spiritual health. You are the great healer, and we pray for healing of mind and body for those we now name in the silence of our hearts.
Come, let us bow down 
 Before the LORD our Maker.

Good Shepherd, within your embrace we find justice. We bring to you the brave voices who cry out for freedom, those prepared to stand up and be heard without counting the cost. We pray for those who have been imprisoned or tortured for their race, colour, caste or faith. For all Christians who have taken up the Cross and know its weight and pain.
Come, let us bow down 
 Before the LORD our Maker.

Good Shepherd, within your embrace we find peace. We bring to you those orphaned, crippled or dispossessed by war, for refugees wandering this earth in search of a home, for all victims of strife and warfare, and for all those who have dedicated their lives for the search for peace and reconciliation.
Come, let us bow down 
 Before the LORD our Maker.

Holy God,
through your Son you have called us
to live faithfully and act courageously.
Keep us steadfast in your covenant of grace,
and teach us the wisdom that comes
only through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Almighty God, 
who called your servant William Law
to a devout and holy life: 
grant that by your spirit of Love
and through faithfulness in prayer
we may find the way to divine knowledge
and so come to see the hidden things of God; 
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, 
who is alive and reigns with you, 
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Help us to hear your word and obey it,
and bring your saving love
to fruition in our lives. Amen.
*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The intercession is by John Birch, faithandworship.com. The collect and closing sentence are from _Evangelical Lutheran Worship_, (c) 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Born at Kings Cliffe in Northamptonshire in 1686, William Law was educated at Emmanuel College Cambridge and, after ordination as a deacon, became a fellow of the College in 1711. When George I came to the throne in 1714, William declined to take the Oath of Allegiance, being a member of the Non-Juror party who believed the anointed but deposed monarch James II and his heirs should occupy the throne. He lost his fellowship but in 1728 he was made a priest and in the same year published A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life, which much influenced such people as Samuel Johnson and John and Charles Wesley. In it he stresses the moral virtues, a personal prayer life and asceticism. He returned to Kings Cliffe in 1740, where he led a life of devotion and simplicity and caring for the poor. He remained there the rest of his life and died on this day in the year 1761. [Exciting Holiness]


More information about the oremus mailing list