OREMUS: 18 September 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Sep 17 21:31:25 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Saturday, September 18, 2010
Ninian, Bishop of Galloway, Apostle to the Picts

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
in Christ the walls that divide are broken down,
the chains that enslave are thrown aside,
and we are freed from death and despair
to life and hope,
liberated from hate and war
and empowered to love and seek peace.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 90

Lord, you have been our refuge*
 from one generation to another.
Before the mountains were brought forth,
   or the land and the earth were born,*
 from age to age you are God.
You turn us back to the dust and say,*
 'Go back, O child of earth.'
For a thousand years in your sight
   are like yesterday when it is past*
 and like a watch in the night.
You sweep us away like a dream;*
 we fade away suddenly like the grass.
In the morning it is green and flourishes;*
 in the evening it is dried up and withered.
For we consume away in your displeasure;*
 we are afraid because of your wrathful indignation.
Our iniquities you have set before you,*
 and our secret sins in the light of your countenance.
When you are angry, all our days are gone;*
 we bring our years to an end like a sigh.
The span of our life is seventy years,
   perhaps in strength even eighty;*
 yet the sum of them is but labour and sorrow,
   for they pass away quickly and we are gone.
Who regards the power of your wrath?*
 who rightly fears your indignation?
So teach us to number our days*
 that we may apply our hearts to wisdom.
Return, O Lord; how long will you tarry?*
 be gracious to your servants.
Satisfy us by your lovingkindness in the morning;*
 so shall we rejoice and be glad all the days of our life.
Make us glad by the measure of the days
   that you afflicted us*
 and the years in which we suffered adversity.
Show your servants your works*
 and your splendour to their children.
May the graciousness of the Lord our God be upon us;*
 prosper the work of our hands;
   prosper our handiwork.

Psalm 91

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High,*
 abides under the shadow of the Almighty.
He shall say to the Lord,
   'You are my refuge and my stronghold,*
 my God in whom I put my trust.'
He shall deliver you from the snare of the hunter*
 and from the deadly pestilence.
He shall cover you with his pinions,
   and you shall find refuge under his wings;*
 his faithfulness shall be a shield and buckler.
You shall not be afraid of any terror by night,*
 nor of the arrow that flies by day;
Of the plague that stalks in the darkness,*
 nor of the sickness that lays waste at midday.
A thousand shall fall at your side
   and ten thousand at your right hand,*
 but it shall not come near you.
Your eyes have only to behold*
 to see the reward of the wicked.
Because you have made the Lord your refuge,*
 and the Most High your habitation.
There shall no evil happen to you,*
 neither shall any plague come near your dwelling.
For he shall give his angels charge over you,*
 to keep you in all your ways.
They shall bear you in their hands,*
 lest you dash your foot against a stone.
You shall tread upon the lion and adder;*
 you shall trample the young lion and the serpent
   under your feet.
Because he is bound to me in love,
   therefore will I deliver him;*
 I will protect him, because he knows my name.
He shall call upon me and I will answer him;*
 I am with him in trouble,
   I will rescue him and bring him to honour.
With long life will I satisfy him,*
 and show him my salvation.

Psalm 92

It is a good thing to give thanks to the Lord,*
 and to sing praises to your name, O Most High;
To tell of your lovingkindness early in the morning*
 and of your faithfulness in the night season;
On the psaltery and on the lyre*
 and to the melody of the harp.
For you have made me glad by your acts, O Lord;*
 and I shout for joy because of the works of your hands.
Lord, how great are your works!*
 your thoughts are very deep.
The dullard does not know,
   nor does the fool understand,*
 that though the wicked grow like weeds,
   and all the workers of iniquity flourish,
They flourish only to be destroyed for ever;*
 but you, O Lord, are exalted for evermore.
For lo, your enemies, O Lord,
   lo, your enemies shall perish,*
 and all the workers of iniquity shall be scattered.
But my horn you have exalted
   like the horns of wild bulls;*
 I am anointed with fresh oil.
My eyes also gloat over my enemies,*
 and my ears rejoice to hear the doom of the wicked
   who rise up against me.
The righteous shall flourish like a palm tree,*
 and shall spread abroad like a cedar of Lebanon.
Those who are planted in the house of the Lord*
 shall flourish in the courts of our God;
They shall still bear fruit in old age;*
 they shall be green and succulent;
That they may show how upright the Lord is,*
 my rock, in whom there is no fault.

FIRST READING [1 Kings 3:16-end]:

Later, two women who were prostitutes came to the king and stood before him. One woman said, 'Please, my lord, this woman and I live in the same house; and I gave birth while she was in the house. Then on the third day after I gave birth, this woman also gave birth. We were together; there was no one else with us in the house, only the two of us were in the house. Then this woman's son died in the night, because she lay on him. She got up in the middle of the night and took my son from beside me while your servant slept. She laid him at her breast, and laid her dead son at my breast. When I rose in the morning to nurse my son, I saw that he was dead; but when I looked at him closely in the morning, clearly it was not the son I had borne.' But the other woman said, 'No, the living son is mine, and the dead son is yours.' The first said, 'No, the dead son is yours, and the living son is mine.' So they argued before the king. 

Then the king said, 'One says, “This is my son that is alive, and your son is dead”; while the other says, “Not so! Your son is dead, and my son is the living one.” ' So the king said, 'Bring me a sword', and they brought a sword before the king. The king said, 'Divide the living boy in two; then give half to one, and half to the other.' But the woman whose son was alive said to the king—because compassion for her son burned within her—'Please, my lord, give her the living boy; certainly do not kill him!' The other said, 'It shall be neither mine nor yours; divide it.' Then the king responded: 'Give the first woman the living boy; do not kill him. She is his mother.' All Israel heard of the judgement that the king had rendered; and they stood in awe of the king, because they perceived that the wisdom of God was in him, to execute justice. 

HYMN 
Words: Joseph Addison (1672-1719), 1712
Tune: Contemplation, Belgrave, St. Stephen, St. Fulbert, Durham

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/w/w254.html
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When all thy mercies, O my God,
my rising soul surveys,
transported with the view, I'm lost
in wonder, love and praise.

Thy Providence my life sustained,
and all my wants redressed,
while in the silent womb I lay,
and hung upon the breast.

To all my weak complaints and cries
thy mercy lent an ear,
ere yet my feeble thoughts had learned
to form themselves in prayer.

Unnumbered comforts to my soul
thy tender care bestowed,
before my infant heart conceived
from whom those comforts flowed.

When in the slippery paths of youth
with heedless steps I ran,
thine arm unseen conveyed me safe,
and led me up to man.

Through hidden dangers, toils, and deaths,
it gently cleared my way;
and through the pleasing snares of vice,
more to be feared than they.

O how shall words with equal warmth
the gratitude declare,
that glows within my ravished heart?
but thou canst read it there.

Thy bounteous hand with worldly bliss
hath made my cup run o'er;
and, in a kind and faithful Friend,
hath doubled all my store.

Ten thousand thousand precious gifts
my daily thanks employ;
nor is the last a cheerful heart
that tastes those gifts with joy.

When worn with sickness, oft hast thou
with health renewed my face;
and, when in sins and sorrows sunk,
revived my soul with grace.

Through every period of my life
thy goodness I'll pursue
and after death, in distant worlds,
the glorious theme renew.

When nature fails, and day and night
divide thy works no more,
my ever grateful heart, O Lord,
thy mercy shall adore.

Through all eternity to thee
a joyful song I'll raise;
for, oh, eternity's too short
to utter all thy praise! 

SECOND READING [Matt. 9:9-17]:

As Jesus was walking along, he saw a man called Matthew sitting at the tax booth; and he said to him, 'Follow me.' And he got up and followed him. 

And as he sat at dinner in the house, many tax-collectors and sinners came and were sitting with him and his disciples. When the Pharisees saw this, they said to his disciples, 'Why does your teacher eat with tax-collectors and sinners?' But when he heard this, he said, 'Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. Go and learn what this means, “I desire mercy, not sacrifice.” For I have come to call not the righteous but sinners.' 

Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, 'Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not fast?' And Jesus said to them, 'The wedding-guests cannot mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, can they? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast. No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old cloak, for the patch pulls away from the cloak, and a worse tear is made. Neither is new wine put into old wineskins; otherwise, the skins burst, and the wine is spilled, and the skins are destroyed; but new wine is put into fresh wineskins, and so both are preserved.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Blessed are you, eternal God,
to be praised and glorified for ever.

Hear us as we pray for your holy Catholic Church:
make us all one, that the world may believe.

Grant that every member of the Church
may truly and humbly serve you:
that the life of Christ may be revealed in us.

Strengthen all who minister in Christ(s name:
give them courage to proclaim your Gospel.

Inspire and lead those who hold authority
in the nations of the world:
guide them in the ways of justice and peace.

Make us alive to the needs of our community:
help us to share each other(s joys and burdens.

Look with kindness on our homes and families:
grant that your love may grow in our hearts.

Deepen our compassion for all who suffer 
from sickness, grief or trouble:
in your presence may they find their strength.

We remember those who have died:
may they rest in your peace.

We praise you for all your saints 
who have entered your eternal glory:
bring us all to share in your heavenly kingdom.

Lord Jesus Christ,
in our pilgrimage through this life,
rescue us from evil,
and make your face to shine on us,
for you are our Lord and our God.  Amen.

Almighty and everlasting God,
who called your servant Ninian to preach the gospel
to the people of northern Britain:
raise up in this and every land
heralds and evangelists of your kingdom,
that your Church may make know the immeasurable riches
of your Son our Savior Jesus Christ,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Let your peace, O God,
fill our hearts, our world, our universe. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer uses phrases from a hymn by Walter Farquahrson and a prayer by
Satish Kumar. The closing prayer uses a sentence from the same prayer by Kumar. 

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Ninian is also called Nynia, Ninias, Rigna, Trignan, Ninnidh, Ringan, Ninus, or Dinan. He was a Celt, born in southern Scotland in about 360, and is regarded as the first major preacher of the Gospel to the people living in Britain north of the Wall--that is, living outside the territory that had been under Roman rule. He is said to have studied in Rome (note that he is contemporary with Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine), but was chiefly influenced by his friendship with Martin of Tours, with whom he spent some considerable time when he was returning from Italy to Britain. It is probable that he named his headquarters in Galloway after Martin's foundation in Gall. Martin had a monastery known as LOCO TEIAC, a Latinized form of the Celtic LEUG TIGIAC. LEUG means "white, shining," and TIG means "house" (a shanty, or SHAN-TIG, is an old house). The suffix -AC means "little." Thus, Martin's monastery had a name which in Celtic means "little white house." At about the time of Martin's death in 397, Ninian built a church at Galloway, in southwest Scotland. It was built of stone and plastered white, an unusual construction in a land where almost all buildings were wood. He called it Candida Casa (White House) or Whithorn, presumably after Martin's foundation at Tours. Archaeologists have excavated and partially restored his church in this century. From his base at Galloway, Ninian reached throughout southern Scotland, south of the Grampian Mountains, and conducted preaching missions among the Picts of Scotland, as far north as the Moray Firth, He also preached in the Solway Plains and the Lake District of England.
Like Patrick (a generation later) and Columba (a century and a half later), he was a
principal agent in preserving the tradition of the old Romano-British Church and forming the character of Celtic Christianity. Some historians think that the number and extent of his conversions has been exaggerated, but throughout southern Scotland there are many and widespread churches that bear his name, and have traditionally been assumed to be congregations originally founded by him.
Our information about him comes chiefly from Bede's History (Book 3, chapter 4), an
anonymous eighth century account, and a 12th century account by Aelred. Aelred is
writing 700 years after the event, and is for that reason rejected as untrustworthy by many critics. However, he claims to rely on an earlier account, "written by a barbarian." This suggests that he may have had an authentic record by a member of Ninian's community in Galloway. [James Kiefer]



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