OREMUS: 9 September 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Sep 8 17:00:00 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Thursday, September 9, 2010
Charles Fuge Lowder, Priest, 1880

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
who shaped creation at earth's chaotic dawn,
who framed us in your image;
your goodness is revealed in mercy and compassion,
you touch us with tenderness,
and broken hearts are healed.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 44

We have heard with our ears, O God,
   our forebears have told us,*
 the deeds you did in their days,
   in the days of old.
How with your hand you drove the peoples out
   and planted our forebears in the land;*
 how you destroyed nations and made your people flourish.
For they did not take the land by their sword,
   nor did their arm win the victory for them;*
 but your right hand, your arm,
   and the light of your countenance,
   because you favoured them.
You are my King and my God;*
 you command victories for Jacob.
Through you we pushed back our adversaries;*
 through your name we trampled on those
   who rose up against us.
For I do not rely on my bow,*
 and my sword does not give me the victory.
Surely, you gave us victory over our adversaries*
 and put those who hate us to shame.
Every day we gloried in God,*
 and we will praise your name for ever.
Nevertheless, you have rejected and humbled us*
 and do not go forth with our armies.
You have made us fall back before our adversary,*
 and our enemies have plundered us.
You have made us like sheep to be eaten*
 and have scattered us among the nations.
You are selling your people for a trifle*
 and are making no profit on the sale of them.
You have made us the scorn of our neighbours,*
 a mockery and derision to those around us.
You have made us a byword among the nations,*
 a laughingstock among the peoples.
My humiliation is daily before me,*
 and shame has covered my face;
Because of the taunts of the mockers and blasphemers,*
 because of the enemy and avenger.
All this has come upon us;*
 yet we have not forgotten you,
   nor have we betrayed your covenant.
Our heart never turned back,*
 nor did our footsteps stray from your path;
Though you thrust us down into a place of misery,*
 and covered us over with deep darkness.
If we have forgotten the name of our God,*
 or stretched out our hands to some strange god,
Will not God find it out?*
 for he knows the secrets of the heart.
Indeed, for your sake we are killed all the day long;*
 we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.
Awake, O Lord! why are you sleeping?*
 Arise! do not reject us for ever.
Why have you hidden your face*
 and forgotten our affliction and oppression?
We sink down into the dust;*
 our body cleaves to the ground.
Rise up and help us,*
 and save us for the sake of your steadfast love.

Psalm 45

My heart is stirring with a noble song;
   let me recite what I have fashioned for the king;*
 my tongue shall be the pen of a skilled writer.
You are the fairest of men;*
 grace flows from your lips,
   because God has blessed you for ever.
Strap your sword upon your thigh, O mighty warrior,*
 in your pride and in your majesty.
Ride out and conquer in the cause of truth*
 and for the sake of justice.
Your right hand will show you marvellous things;*
 your arrows are very sharp, O mighty warrior.
The peoples are falling at your feet,*
 and the king's enemies are losing heart.
Your throne, O God, endures for ever and ever,*
 a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of your kingdom;
   you love righteousness and hate iniquity;
Therefore God, your God, has anointed you*
 with the oil of gladness above your fellows.
All your garments are fragrant with myrrh, aloes and cassia,*
 and the music of strings from ivory palaces makes you glad.
Kings' daughters stand among the ladies of the court;*
 on your right hand is the queen,
   adorned with the gold of Ophir.
'Hear, O daughter; consider and listen closely;*
 forget your people and your family's house.
'The king will have pleasure in your beauty;*
 he is your master; therefore do him honour.
'The people of Tyre are here with a gift;*
 the rich among the people seek your favour.'
All glorious is the princess as she enters;*
 her gown is clothofgold.
In embroidered apparel she is brought to the king;*
 after her the bridesmaids follow in procession.
With joy and gladness they are brought,*
 and enter into the palace of the king.
'In place of fathers, O king, you shall have sons;*
 you shall make them princes over all the earth.
'I will make your name to be remembered
   from one generation to another;*
 therefore nations will praise you for ever and ever.'

Psalm 46

God is our refuge and strength,*
 a very present help in trouble;
Therefore we will not fear, though the earth be moved,*
 and though the mountains be toppled
   into the depths of the sea;
Though its waters rage and foam,*
 and though the mountains tremble at its tumult.
The Lord of hosts is with us;*
 the God of Jacob is our stronghold.
There is a river whose streams
   make glad the city of God,*
 the holy habitation of the Most High.
God is in the midst of her;
   she shall not be overthrown;*
 God shall help her at the break of day.
The nations make much ado
   and the kingdoms are shaken;*
 God has spoken and the earth shall melt away.
The Lord of hosts is with us;*
 the God of Jacob is our stronghold.
Come now and look upon the works of the Lord,*
 what awesome things he has done on earth.
It is he who makes war to cease in all the world;*
 he breaks the bow and shatters the spear
   and burns the shields with fire.
'Be still, then, and know that I am God;*
 I will be exalted among the nations;
   I will be exalted in the earth.'
The Lord of hosts is with us;*
 the God of Jacob is our stronghold.

FIRST READING [2 Sam. 18:19-end]:

Then Ahimaaz son of Zadok said, 'Let me run, and carry tidings to the king that the Lord has delivered him from the power of his enemies.' Joab said to him, 'You are not to carry tidings today; you may carry tidings another day, but today you shall not do so, because the king's son is dead.' Then Joab said to a Cushite, 'Go, tell the king what you have seen.' The Cushite bowed before Joab, and ran. Then Ahimaaz son of Zadok said again to Joab, 'Come what may, let me also run after the Cushite.' And Joab said, 'Why will you run, my son, seeing that you have no reward for the tidings?' 'Come what may,' he said, 'I will run.' So he said to him, 'Run.' Then Ahimaaz ran by the way of the Plain, and outran the Cushite. 

Now David was sitting between the two gates. The sentinel went up to the roof of the gate by the wall, and when he looked up, he saw a man running alone. The sentinel shouted and told the king. The king said, 'If he is alone, there are tidings in his mouth.' He kept coming, and drew near. Then the sentinel saw another man running; and the sentinel called to the gatekeeper and said, 'See, another man running alone!' The king said, 'He also is bringing tidings.' The sentinel said, 'I think the running of the first one is like the running of Ahimaaz son of Zadok.' The king said, 'He is a good man, and comes with good tidings.' 

Then Ahimaaz cried out to the king, 'All is well!' He prostrated himself before the king with his face to the ground, and said, 'Blessed be the Lord your God, who has delivered up the men who raised their hand against my lord the king.' The king said, 'Is it well with the young man Absalom?' Ahimaaz answered, 'When Joab sent your servant, I saw a great tumult, but I do not know what it was.' The king said, 'Turn aside, and stand here.' So he turned aside, and stood still. 

Then the Cushite came; and the Cushite said, 'Good tidings for my lord the king! For the Lord has vindicated you this day, delivering you from the power of all who rose up against you.' The king said to the Cushite, 'Is it well with the young man Absalom?' The Cushite answered, 'May the enemies of my lord the king, and all who rise up to do you harm, be like that young man.' 

The king was deeply moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept; and as he went, he said, 'O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! Would that I had died instead of you, O Absalom, my son, my son!' 

HYMN 
Words: Gerhardt Tersteegen, 1729; trans. John Wesley, 1738 
Tune: Vater unser, St. Catherine

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/t/t597.html
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Thou hidden love of God, whose height,
whose depth unfathomed no man knows,
I see from afar thy beauteous light,
and inly sigh for thy repose;
my heart is pained, nor can it be
at rest, till it finds rest in thee.

Thy secret voice invites me still
the sweetness of thy yoke to prove;
and fain I would; but though my will
seems fixed, yet wide my passions rove;
yet hindrances strew all the way;
I aim at thee, yet from thee stray.

'Tis mercy all that thou has brought
my mind to seek its peace in thee;
yet while I seek, but find thee not,
no peace my wandering soul shall see.
O when shall all my wanderings end,
And all my steps to theeward tend?

Is there a thing beneath the sun
that strives with thee my heart to share?
Ah, tear it hence and reign alone,
the Lord of every motion there;
then shall my heart from earth be free,
when it hath found repose in thee.

O hide this self from me, that I
no more, but Christ in me, may live!
my vile affections crucify,
nor let one darling lust survive
in all things nothing may I see,
nothing desire or seek, but thee!

O Love, thy sovereign aid impart
to save me from low thought care;
chase this self will from all my heart,
from all its hidden mazes there;
make me thy duteous child that I
ceaseless may "Abba, Father" cry.

Ah no! ne'er will I backward turn:
thine wholly, thine alone I am!
thrice happy he who views with scorn
earth's toys, for thee his constant Flame;
O help that I may never move
from the blest footsteps of thy love!

Each moment draw from earth away
my heart that lowly waits thy call;
speak to my inmost soul and say,
"I am thy love, thy God, thy all!"
to feel thy power, to hear thy voice,
to taste thy love, be all my choice. 

SECOND READING [Matt. 5:38-end]:

Jesus said, 'You have heard that it was said, “An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.” But I say to you, Do not resist an evildoer. But if anyone strikes you on the right cheek, turn the other also; and if anyone wants to sue you and take your coat, give your cloak as well; and if anyone forces you to go one mile, go also the second mile. Give to everyone who begs from you, and do not refuse anyone who wants to borrow from you. 

'You have heard that it was said, “You shall love your neighbour and hate your enemy.” But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax-collectors do the same? And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
God of the apostles and martyrs,
we thank you for the hope that is from the beginning.
We bless you for the good news of Jesus
crucified, risen, and interceding for us
until his coming again in glory.

We commend to your care
all who walk and weep in grief and regret.

We pray in hope of your mercy.

We commend to you
all who live far from your image.
We pray in hope of your salvation.

We commend Holy Church,
We pray in hope of your glory.

We commend to your justice all peoples
who participate in oppression, strife and domination of others.
We pray in hope of your justice and peace.

We commend to you all who have died.
We pray in hope of your resurrection.

We commend to you our unfinished business.
We pray in hope of rest in you.

Heavenly Father, you have filled the world with beauty:
open our eyes to behold your gracious hand in all your works;
that, rejoicing in your whole creation,
we may learn to serve you with gladness;
for the sake of him through whom all things were made,
your Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty Father,
you have built up your Church
through the love and devotion of your saints:
Inspire us to follow the example of Charles Fuge Lowder, 
whom we commemorate today,
that we in our generation may rejoice with him
in the vision of your glory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May God make safe to us each step,
May God open to us each door,
May God make clear to us each road.
May God enfold us in loving arms.Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer uses phrases from a hymn by Colin Gibson.

The closing prayer is based on a prayer from _Revised Common Lectionary
Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Charles Lowder was born in 1820 and came under the influence of the Oxford
Movement during his studies at Exeter College in the early 1840s. After
ordination, he became increasingly drawn to a Tractarian and ritualist
expression of the faith, especially after his move to London in 1851, despite the
fierce opposition such Catholic spirituality faced within the Church. As a curate
in Pimlico and Stepney, and then as the first Vicar of St Peter's, London
Docks, Lowder came to epitomise the nineteenth-century Anglo-Catholic 'slum
priest'. Dedicated to the poor and destitute, he was tireless in his parish work.
His health gave way and he died at the age of sixty on this day in 1880.



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