OREMUS: 29 October 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Oct 28 17:00:00 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for October 29
James Hannington, Bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa, Martyr in Uganda, 1885

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God.
We praise you for creating this world in all beauty,
for redeeming the world through Christ, our Lord,
and for sending us the gift of your Spirit
to encourage, instruct, and sustain us.
We long for your Spirit to work among us now,
to inspire our praise, to challenge us with your truth,
and to equip us for service in your world. 
For these and all your mercies, 
we praise you: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 141

O Lord, I call to you; come to me quickly;*
 hear my voice when I cry to you.
Let my prayer be set forth in your sight as incense,*
 the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice.
Set a watch before my mouth, O Lord,
   and guard the door of my lips;*
 let not my heart incline to any evil thing.
Let me not be occupied in wickedness with evildoers,*
 nor eat of their choice foods.
Let the righteous smite me in friendly rebuke;
   let not the oil of the unrighteous anoint my head;*
 for my prayer is continually against their wicked deeds.
Let their rulers be overthrown in stony places,*
 that they may know my words are true.
As when a plough turns over the earth in furrows,*
 let their bones be scattered at the mouth of the grave.
But my eyes are turned to you, Lord God;*
 in you I take refuge; do not strip me of my life.
Protect me from the snare which they have laid for me*
 and from the traps of the evildoers.
Let the wicked fall into their own nets,*
 while I myself escape.

Psalm 142

I cry to the Lord with my voice;*
 to the Lord I make loud supplication.
I pour out my complaint before him*
 and tell him all my trouble.
When my spirit languishes within me, you know my path;*
 in the way wherein I walk they have hidden a trap for me.
I look to my right hand and find no one who knows me;*
 I have no place to flee to and no one cares for me.
I cry out to you, O Lord;*
 I say, 'You are my refuge,
   my portion in the land of the living.'
Listen to my cry for help,
   for I have been brought very low;*
 save me from those who pursue me,
   for they are too strong for me.
Bring me out of prison,
   that I may give thanks to your name;*
 when you have dealt bountifully with me,
   the righteous will gather around me.

Psalm 143

Lord, hear my prayer,
   and in your faithfulness heed my supplications;*
 answer me in your righteousness.
Enter not into judgement with your servant,*
 for in your sight shall no one living be justified.
For my enemy has sought my life
   and has crushed me to the ground;*
 making me live in dark places
   like those who are long dead.
My spirit faints within me;*
 my heart within me is desolate.
I remember the time past;
   I muse upon all your deeds;*
 I consider the works of your hands.
I spread out my hands to you;*
 my soul gasps to you like a thirsty land.
O Lord, make haste to answer me; my spirit fails me;*
 do not hide your face from me
   or I shall be like those who go down to the Pit.
Let me hear of your lovingkindness in the morning,
   for I put my trust in you;*
 show me the road that I must walk,
   for I lift up my soul to you.
Deliver me from my enemies, O Lord,*
 for I flee to you for refuge.
Teach me to do what pleases you, for you are my God;*
 let your good Spirit lead me on level ground.
Revive me, O Lord, for your name's sake;*
 for your righteousness' sake, bring me out of trouble.

FIRST READING [Job 7:1–21]:

Job continued, 'Do not human beings have a hard service on earth,
   and are not their days like the days of a labourer? 
Like a slave who longs for the shadow,
   and like labourers who look for their wages, 
so I am allotted months of emptiness,
   and nights of misery are apportioned to me. 
When I lie down I say, "When shall I rise?"
   But the night is long,
   and I am full of tossing until dawn. 
My flesh is clothed with worms and dirt;
   my skin hardens, then breaks out again. 
My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle,
   and come to their end without hope. 

'Remember that my life is a breath;
   my eye will never again see good. 
The eye that beholds me will see me no more;
   while your eyes are upon me, I shall be gone. 
As the cloud fades and vanishes,
   so those who go down to Sheol do not come up; 
they return no more to their houses,
   nor do their places know them any more. 

'Therefore I will not restrain my mouth;
   I will speak in the anguish of my spirit;
   I will complain in the bitterness of my soul. 
Am I the Sea, or the Dragon,
   that you set a guard over me? 
When I say, "My bed will comfort me,
   my couch will ease my complaint", 
then you scare me with dreams
   and terrify me with visions, 
so that I would choose strangling
   and death rather than this body. 
I loathe my life; I would not live for ever.
   Let me alone, for my days are a breath. 
What are human beings, that you make so much of them,
   that you set your mind on them, 
visit them every morning,
   test them every moment? 
Will you not look away from me for a while,
   let me alone until I swallow my spittle? 
If I sin, what do I do to you, you watcher of humanity?
   Why have you made me your target?
   Why have I become a burden to you? 
Why do you not pardon my transgression
   and take away my iniquity?
For now I shall lie in the earth;
   you will seek me, but I shall not be.' 

HYMN 
Words: Elizabeth Cosnett (born 1936) © 1980 Stainer & Bell Ltd Used with permission
Tune: Epworth

Can man by searching find out God
Or formulate his ways? 
Can numbers measure what he is
Or words contain his praise? 

Although his being is too bright
For human eyes to scan, 
His meaning lights our shadowed world
Through Christ, the Son of Man. 

Our boastfulness is turned to shame, 
Our profit counts as loss, 
When earthly values stand beside
The manger and the cross. 

We there may recognise his light, 
May kindle in its rays, 
Find there the source of penitence, 
The starting-point for praise. 

There God breaks in upon our search, 
Makes birth and death his own: 
He speaks to us in human terms
To make his glory known.

SECOND READING [Matthew 19:16–30]:

Then someone came to Jesus and said, 'Teacher, what good deed must I do to have eternal life?' And he said to him, 'Why do you ask me about what is good? There is only one who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.' He said to him, 'Which ones?' And Jesus said, 'You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; Honour your father and mother; also, You shall love your neighbour as yourself.' The young man said to him, 'I have kept all these; what do I still lack?' Jesus said to him, 'If you wish to be perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.' When the young man heard this word, he went away grieving, for he had many possessions. 

Then Jesus said to his disciples, 'Truly I tell you, it will be hard for a rich person to enter the kingdom of heaven. Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.' When the disciples heard this, they were greatly astounded and said, 'Then who can be saved?' But Jesus looked at them and said, 'For mortals it is impossible, but for God all things are possible.' 

Then Peter said in reply, 'Look, we have left everything and followed you. What then will we have?' Jesus said to them, 'Truly I tell you, at the renewal of all things, when the Son of Man is seated on the throne of his glory, you who have followed me will also sit on twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel. And everyone who has left houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or fields, for my name's sake, will receive a hundredfold, and will inherit eternal life. But many who are first will be last, and the last will be first. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We give you praise and thanks, O God, for all gifts of
love we have received from you, and for your persistent
mercy in Jesus Christ. Especially we thank you for
     work we have accomplished pleasing to you...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     the faithful witness of Christian people...
     the example of righteousness we see in parents and teachers...
     the innocence and openness we see in children...
     all works of Christian compassion...

We give you our cares and concerns, O God, because we
know you are kind and care for your children in every
circumstance. Especially we pray for
     those who struggle with doubt and despair...
            (Lord, hear our prayer.) 
     people afflicted with disease...
     those called to special ministries...
     people neglected or abused...
     Baptist, Disciples of Christ, and other free churches...

Lord God, our protector and guide,
who made us knowing both good and evil:
receive our prayer and, by your wisdom,
help us to discern and desire all that is good,
that the offering of our lives may be acceptable to you;
through Jesus Christ,
who suffered the darkness of torment and trial
and now is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
for ever and ever. Amen.
		
Grant, O God, 
that we who this day commemorate 
your servant James Hannington and his fellow-martyrs of Uganda, 
may, by their courage and devotion, be stirred up 
to a deeper love of our Savior 
and to perseverance in the Christian calling;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

To Jesus Christ, who loves us
and freed us from our sins by his blood
and made us to be a kingdom,
priests serving his God and Father,
to him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is adapted from a prayer in _The Worship Sourcebook_, (c) 2004, CRC Publications. Used with permission. The closing prayer is Revelation 1:5-6, NRSV

James Hannington was born in 1847 of a Congregationalist family but he became an Anglican before going up to Oxford. He was ordained and, after serving a curacy for five years, went with the Church Missionary Society to Uganda. He was consecrated bishop for that part of Africa in 1884 and a year later began a safari inland from Mombasa, together with other European and indigenous Christians. The King of the Buganda, Mwanga, who despised Christians because they refused to condone his moral turpitude, seized the whole party, tortured them for several days and then had them butchered to death on this day in 1885. [Exciting Holiness]


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