OREMUS: 21 October 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Oct 20 17:00:00 GMT 2010


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org
*******************************************************

OREMUS for October 21

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
you know each of us by name,
and in your sight we have found favor,
yet our minds cannot comprehend the vision of your glory
or the vastness of your love.
We praise you for forming us in your image
and calling us to be your people.
For these and all your mercies, 
we praise you: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 106

Alleluia!
   Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good,*
 for his mercy endures for ever.
Who can declare the mighty acts of the Lord*
 or show forth all his praise?
Happy are those who act with justice*
 and always do what is right!
Remember me, O Lord,
   with the favour you have for your people,*
 and visit me with your saving help;
That I may see the prosperity of your elect
   and be glad with the gladness of your people,*
 that I may glory with your inheritance.
We have sinned as our forebears did;*
 we have done wrong and dealt wickedly.

In Egypt they did not consider your marvellous works,
   nor remember the abundance of your love;*
 they defied the Most High at the Red Sea.
But he saved them for his name's sake,*
 to make his power known.
He rebuked the Red Sea and it dried up,*
 and he led them through the deep as through a desert.
He saved them from the hand of those who hated them*
 and redeemed them from the hand of the enemy.
The waters covered their oppressors;*
 not one of them was left.
Then they believed his words*
 and sang him songs of praise.
But they soon forgot his deeds*
 and did not wait for his counsel.
A craving seized them in the wilderness,*
 and they put God to the test in the desert.
He gave them what they asked,*
 but sent leanness into their soul.
They envied Moses in the camp,*
 and Aaron, the holy one of the Lord.
The earth opened and swallowed Dathan*
 and covered the company of Abiram.
Fire blazed up against their company,*
 and flames devoured the wicked.
Israel made a bullcalf at Horeb*
 and worshipped a molten image;
And so they exchanged their Glory*
 for the image of an ox that feeds on grass.
They forgot God their saviour,*
 who had done great things in Egypt,
Wonderful deeds in the land of Ham,*
 and fearful things at the Red Sea.
So he would have destroyed them,
   had not Moses his chosen
   stood before him in the breach,*
 to turn away his wrath from consuming them.

Our forebears refused the pleasant land*
 and would not believe God's promise.
They grumbled in their tents*
 and would not listen to the voice of the Lord.
So he lifted his hand against them,*
 to overthrow them in the wilderness,
To cast out their seed among the nations,*
 and to scatter them throughout the lands.
They joined themselves to BaalPeor*
 and ate sacrifices offered to the dead.
They provoked him to anger with their actions,*
 and a plague broke out among them.
Then Phinehas stood up and interceded,*
 and the plague came to an end.
This was reckoned to him as righteousness*
 throughout all generations for ever.
Again they provoked his anger at the waters of Meribah,*
 so that he punished Moses because of them;
For they so embittered his spirit*
 that he spoke rash words with his lips.
They did not destroy the peoples*
 as the Lord had commanded them.
They intermingled with the heathen*
 and learned their pagan ways,
So that they worshipped their idols,*
 which became a snare to them.! v37 >
They sacrificed their sons*
 and their daughters to evil spirits.
They shed innocent blood,
   the blood of their sons and daughters,*
 which they offered to the idols of Canaan,
   and the land was defiled with blood.
Thus they were polluted by their actions*
 and went whoring in their evil deeds;
Therefore the wrath of the Lord
   was kindled against his people*
 and he abhorred his inheritance.
He gave them over to the hand of the heathen,*
 and those who hated them ruled over them.
Their enemies oppressed them,*
 and they were humbled under their hand.
Many a time did he deliver them,
   but they rebelled through their own devices,*
 and were brought down in their iniquity.
Nevertheless, he saw their distress,*
 when he heard their lamentation.
He remembered his covenant with them*
 and relented in accordance with his great mercy.
He caused them to be pitied*
 by those who held them captive.
Save us, O Lord our God,
   and gather us from among the nations,*
 that we may give thanks to your holy name
   and glory in your praise.
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel,
   from everlasting and to everlasting;*
 and let all the people say, 'Amen!'
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Deuteronomy 20:1–20]:

When you go out to war against your enemies, and see horses and chariots, an army larger than your own, you shall not be afraid of them; for the Lord your God is with you, who brought you up from the land of Egypt. Before you engage in battle, the priest shall come forward and speak to the troops, and shall say to them: 'Hear, O Israel! Today you are drawing near to do battle against your enemies. Do not lose heart, or be afraid, or panic, or be in dread of them; for it is the Lord your God who goes with you, to fight for you against your enemies, to give you victory.' Then the officials shall address the troops, saying, 'Has anyone built a new house but not dedicated it? He should go back to his house, or he might die in the battle and another dedicate it. Has anyone planted a vineyard but not yet enjoyed its fruit? He should go back to his house, or he might die in the battle and another be first to enjoy its fruit. Has anyone become engaged to a woman but not yet married her? He should go back to his house, or he might die in the battle and another marry her.' The officials shall continue to address the troops, saying, 'Is anyone afraid or disheartened? He should go back to his house, or he might cause the heart of his comrades to fail like his own.' When the officials have finished addressing the troops, then the commanders shall take charge of them. 

When you draw near to a town to fight against it, offer it terms of peace. If it accepts your terms of peace and surrenders to you, then all the people in it shall serve you in forced labour. If it does not submit to you peacefully, but makes war against you, then you shall besiege it; and when the Lord your God gives it into your hand, you shall put all its males to the sword. You may, however, take as your booty the women, the children, livestock, and everything else in the town, all its spoil. You may enjoy the spoil of your enemies, which the Lord your God has given you. Thus you shall treat all the towns that are very far from you, which are not towns of the nations here. But as for the towns of these peoples that the Lord your God is giving you as an inheritance, you must not let anything that breathes remain alive. You shall annihilate them—the Hittites and the Amorites, the Canaanites and the Perizzites, the Hivites and the Jebusites—just as the Lord your God has commanded, so that they may not teach you to do all the abhorrent things that they do for their gods, and you thus sin against the Lord your God. 

If you besiege a town for a long time, making war against it in order to take it, you must not destroy its trees by wielding an axe against them. Although you may take food from them, you must not cut them down. Are trees in the field human beings that they should come under siege from you? You may destroy only the trees that you know do not produce food; you may cut them down for use in building siege-works against the town that makes war with you, until it falls. 

HYMN 
Words: William Boyd Carpenter (1841-1918)

Music: St. Petersburg 

Before thy throne, O God, we kneel:
give us a conscience quick to feel,
a ready mind to understand
the meaning of thy chastening hand;
whate'er the pain and shame may be,
bring us, O Father, nearer thee.

Search out our hearts and make us true;
help us to give to all their due.
>From love of pleasure, lust of gold,
from sins which make the heart grow cold,
wean us and train us with thy rod;
teach us to know our faults, O God.

For sins of heedless word and deed,
for pride ambitions to succeed,
for crafty trade and subtle snare
to catch the simple unaware,
for lives bereft of purpose high,
forgive, forgive, O Lord, we cry.

Let the fierce fires which burn and try,
our inmost spirits purify:
consume the ill; purge out the shame;
O God, be with us in the flame;
a newborn people may we rise,
more pure, more true, more nobly wise.

SECOND READING [Matthew 15:21–39]:

 Jesus left that place and went away to the district of Tyre and Sidon. Just then a Canaanite woman from that region came out and started shouting, 'Have mercy on me, Lord, Son of David; my daughter is tormented by a demon.' But he did not answer her at all. And his disciples came and urged him, saying, 'Send her away, for she keeps shouting after us.' He answered, 'I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.' But she came and knelt before him, saying, 'Lord, help me.' He answered, 'It is not fair to take the children's food and throw it to the dogs.' She said, 'Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table.' Then Jesus answered her, 'Woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish.' And her daughter was healed instantly. 

After Jesus had left that place, he passed along the Sea of Galilee, and he went up the mountain, where he sat down. Great crowds came to him, bringing with them the lame, the maimed, the blind, the mute, and many others. They put them at his feet, and he cured them, so that the crowd was amazed when they saw the mute speaking, the maimed whole, the lame walking, and the blind seeing. And they praised the God of Israel. 

Then Jesus called his disciples to him and said, 'I have compassion for the crowd, because they have been with me now for three days and have nothing to eat; and I do not want to send them away hungry, for they might faint on the way.' The disciples said to him, 'Where are we to get enough bread in the desert to feed so great a crowd?' Jesus asked them, 'How many loaves have you?' They said, 'Seven, and a few small fish.' Then ordering the crowd to sit down on the ground, he took the seven loaves and the fish; and after giving thanks he broke them and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. And all of them ate and were filled; and they took up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full. Those who had eaten were four thousand men, besides women and children. After sending away the crowds, he got into the boat and went to the region of Magadan.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray for our own needs and for the needs of others,
following the pattern which Jesus gave
when he taught us to pray to God our Father.

Through our love of the countryside,
through our care for animals,
through our respect for property and tools,
Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name.

On our farms and in our homes,
in our colleges and schools,
where machinery is made, and where policy is planned,
Father, your kingdom come.

By our seeking your guidance,
by our keeping your commandments,
by our living true to our consciences,
Father, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

For the millions who live in poverty and hunger,
for our own needs, and the requirements of our neighbours,
by co-operation, sympathy, and generosity,
Give us today our daily bread.

Because we have broken your commandments, 
doing what we ought not to do,
and neglecting what we ought to do,
Forgive us our sins.

If any have injured us by injustice, double dealing or exploitation,
We forgive those who sin against us.

When prosperity lulls us to false security, 
or adversity prompts us to despair,
when success makes us boastful, 
or failure makes us bitter,
Save us from the time of trial, and deliver us from evil.

In the assurance of faith,
in the confidence of hope,
in the will to serve,
help us to love Christ as Lord, 
and our neighbour as ourselves.
For the kingdom, the power, 
and the glory are yours now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the God whose likeness we bear
focus our hearts and wills on the Gospel,
that we may render worthy worship and loving service
in Jesus' Name. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The
Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is adapted from _Revised Common Lectionary Prayers_,
copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts

The first collect is from _Daily Prayer_, copyright (c) The Scottish
Episcopal Church, 1998. Used with permission. 
http://www.scottishepiscopal.com

The closing prayer is adapted from a prayer by Alan Griffiths. 



More information about the oremus mailing list