OREMUS: 6 October 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Oct 5 17:00:01 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Wednesday, October 6, 2010
William Tyndale, Translator of the Scriptures, Martyr, 1536

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God of our salvation,
we falter before the demands of your word
and turn away from your call to life.
Yet you pour out your mercy on us
as you showed mercy to your people of old,
that we may turn from our sinfulness
and walk the path of self-emptying love
made known in Jesus Christ. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 32

Happy are they whose transgressions are forgiven,*
 and whose sin is put away!
Happy are they to whom the Lord imputes no guilt,*
 and in whose spirit there is no guile!
While I held my tongue, my bones withered away,*
 because of my groaning all day long.
For your hand was heavy upon me day and night;*
 my moisture was dried up as in the heat of summer.
Then I acknowledged my sin to you,*
 and did not conceal my guilt.
I said, 'I will confess my transgressions to the Lord';*
 then you forgave me the guilt of my sin.
Therefore all the faithful will make their prayers to you
   in time of trouble;*
 when the great waters overflow, they shall not reach them.
You are my hidingplace;
   you preserve me from trouble;*
 you surround me with shouts of deliverance.
'I will instruct you and teach you
   in the way that you should go;*
 I will guide you with my eye.
'Do not be like horse or mule,
   which have no understanding;*
 who must be fitted with bit and bridle,
   or else they will not stay near you.'
Great are the tribulations of the wicked;*
 but mercy embraces those who trust in the Lord.
Be glad, you righteous, and rejoice in the Lord;*
 shout for joy, all who are true of heart.

Psalm 33

Rejoice in the Lord, you righteous;*
 it is good for the just to sing praises.
Praise the Lord with the harp;*
 play to him upon the psaltery and lyre.
Sing for him a new song;*
 sound a fanfare with all your skill upon the trumpet.
For the word of the Lord is right,*
 and all his works are sure.
He loves righteousness and justice;*
 the lovingkindness of the Lord fills the whole earth.
By the word of the Lord were the heavens made,*
 by the breath of his mouth all the heavenly hosts.
He gathers up the waters of the ocean
   as in a waterskin*
 and stores up the depths of the sea.
Let all the earth fear the Lord;*
 let all who dwell in the world stand in awe of him.
For he spoke and it came to pass;*
 he commanded and it stood fast.
The Lord brings the will of the nations to naught;*
 he thwarts the designs of the peoples.
But the Lord's will stands fast for ever,*
 and the designs of his heart from age to age.
Happy is the nation whose God is the Lord!*
 happy the people he has chosen to be his own!
The Lord looks down from heaven,*
 and beholds all the people in the world.
>From where he sits enthroned he turns his gaze*
 on all who dwell on the earth.
He fashions all the hearts of them*
 and understands all their works.
There is no king that can be saved by a mighty army;*
 the strong are not delivered by great strength.nbsp;
The horse is a vain hope for deliverance;*
 for all its strength it cannot save.
Behold, the eye of the Lord
   is upon those who fear him,*
 on those who wait upon his love,
To pluck their lives from death,*
 and to feed them in time of famine.
Our soul waits for the Lord;*
 he is our help and our shield.Indeed, our heart rejoices in him,*
 for in his holy name we put our trust.
Let your lovingkindness, O Lord, be upon us,*
 as we have put our trust in you.

Psalm 34

I will bless the Lord at all times;*
 his praise shall ever be in my mouth.
I will glory in the Lord;*
 let the humble hear and rejoice.
Proclaim with me the greatness of the Lord;*
 let us exalt his name together.
I sought the Lord and he answered me*
 and delivered me out of all my terror.
Look upon him and be radiant,*
 and let not your faces be ashamed.
I called in my affliction and the Lord heard me*
 and saved me from all my troubles.
The angel of the Lord
   encompasses those who fear him,*
 and he will deliver them.
Taste and see that the Lord is good;*
 happy are they who trust in him!
Fear the Lord, you that are his saints,*
 for those who fear him lack nothing.
The young lions lack and suffer hunger,*
 but those who seek the Lord
   lack nothing that is good.
Come, children, and listen to me;*
 I will teach you the fear of the Lord.
Who among you loves life*
 and desires long life to enjoy prosperity?
Keep your tongue from evilspeaking*
 and your lips from lying words.
Turn from evil and do good;*
 seek peace and pursue it.
The eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous,*
 and his ears are open to their cry.
The face of the Lord is against those who do evil,*
 to root out the remembrance of them from the earth.
The righteous cry and the Lord hears them*
 and delivers them from all their troubles.
The Lord is near to the brokenhearted*
 and will save those whose spirits are crushed.
Many are the troubles of the righteous,*
 but the Lord will deliver him out of them all.
He will keep safe all his bones;*
 not one of them shall be broken.
Evil shall slay the wicked,*
 and those who hate the righteous will be punished.
The Lord ransoms the life of his servants,*
 and none will be punished who trust in him.

FIRST READING [1 Kings 18:25-30, 36-46]:

Elijah said to the prophets of Baal, 'Choose for yourselves one bull and prepare it first, for you are many; then call on the name of your god, but put no fire to it.' So they took the bull that was given them, prepared it, and called on the name of Baal from morning until noon, crying, 'O Baal, answer us!' But there was no voice, and no answer. They limped about the altar that they had made. At noon Elijah mocked them, saying, 'Cry aloud! Surely he is a god; either he is meditating, or he has wandered away, or he is on a journey, or perhaps he is asleep and must be awakened.' Then they cried aloud and, as was their custom, they cut themselves with swords and lances until the blood gushed out over them. As midday passed, they raved on until the time of the offering of the oblation, but there was no voice, no answer, and no response. 

Then Elijah said to all the people, 'Come closer to me'; and all the people came closer to him. First he repaired the altar of the Lord that had been thrown down; 

At the time of the offering of the oblation, the prophet Elijah came near and said, 'O Lord, God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, let it be known this day that you are God in Israel, that I am your servant, and that I have done all these things at your bidding. Answer me, O Lord, answer me, so that this people may know that you, O Lord, are God, and that you have turned their hearts back.' Then the fire of the Lord fell and consumed the burnt-offering, the wood, the stones, and the dust, and even licked up the water that was in the trench. When all the people saw it, they fell on their faces and said, 'The Lord indeed is God; the Lord indeed is God.' Elijah said to them, 'Seize the prophets of Baal; do not let one of them escape.' Then they seized them; and Elijah brought them down to the Wadi Kishon, and killed them there. 

Elijah said to Ahab, 'Go up, eat and drink; for there is a sound of rushing rain.' So Ahab went up to eat and to drink. Elijah went up to the top of Carmel; there he bowed himself down upon the earth and put his face between his knees. He said to his servant, 'Go up now, look towards the sea.' He went up and looked, and said, 'There is nothing.' Then he said, 'Go again seven times.' At the seventh time he said, 'Look, a little cloud no bigger than a person's hand is rising out of the sea.' Then he said, 'Go and say to Ahab, “Harness your chariot and go down before the rain stops you.” ' In a little while the heavens grew black with clouds and wind; there was heavy rain. Ahab rode off and went to Jezreel. But the hand of the Lord was on Elijah; he girded up his loins and ran in front of Ahab to the entrance of Jezreel. 

HYMN 
Words: Fred Kaan (1929-2009)
Meter: 86 86 D

For all who have enriched our lives,
whom we have loved and known,
for saints alive among us still
by whom our faith is honed,
we thank you, God, who came and comes
through women, children, men,
to share the highs and lows of life:
God-for-us, now as then.

For all who with disarming love
have led us to explore
the risk of reasoning and doubt,
new realms not known before,
we thank you, God, who came and comes
to free us from our past,
from ghettos of a rigid mind,
from truths unfit to last.

For all whose laughter has unnerved
tradition gone awry,
who with incisive gentleness
pursue each human 'why?',
we thank you, God, who came and comes
to those who probe and ask,
who seek to know the mind of Christ
and take the church to task.

Now for each other and ourselves
we pray that, healed of fear,
we may re-live the love of Christ,
prepared in hope to err.
Then leave us, God, who comes and goes,
in human-ness to grow,
to care for people, tend the earth,
- the only earth we know!

SECOND READING [Matt. 14:22-end]:

Immediately Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, but by this time the boat, battered by the waves, was far from the land, for the wind was against them. And early in the morning he came walking towards them on the lake. But when the disciples saw him walking on the lake, they were terrified, saying, 'It is a ghost!' And they cried out in fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, 'Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.' 

Peter answered him, 'Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.' He said, 'Come.' So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came towards Jesus. But when he noticed the strong wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, 'Lord, save me!' Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, 'You of little faith, why did you doubt?' When they got into the boat, the wind ceased. And those in the boat worshipped him, saying, 'Truly you are the Son of God.' 

When they had crossed over, they came to land at Gennesaret. After the people of that place recognized him, they sent word throughout the region and brought all who were sick to him, and begged him that they might touch even the fringe of his cloak; and all who touched it were healed. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray to God the almighty, the King of creation.

Eternal God, we thank you for your light and your truth.
We praise you for your fatherly care
in creating a universe which proclaims your glory.
Inspire us to worship you, the creator of all,
and let your light shine upon our world.
God of life: hear our prayer.

We thank you for the vastness of the universe
and the mysteries of space.
We pray for all scientists and astronomers
who extend the boundaries of our knowledge.
As we contemplate the wonder of the heavens,
confirm us in the truth that every human being is
known and loved by you.
God of life: hear our prayer.

We thank you for the beauty of the earth,
for the diversity of land and sea,
for the resources of the earth.
Give us the will to cherish this planet
and to use its riches for the good and welfare of all.
God of life: hear our prayer.

We thank you for the warmth of the sun,
the light of the moon, the glory of the stars.
We praise you for the formations of clouds,
the radiance of dawn and sunset.
Save us from wasting or abusing the energy
on which all life depends.
Open our eyes to behold your beauty,
and our lips to praise your name.
God of life: hear our prayer.

We thank you for the teeming life of the seas,
and the flight of the birds.
Help us to protect the environment
so that all life may flourish.
God of life: hear our prayer.

We rejoice in the variety of animal life.
Grant us grace to treat all animals with respect and care;
to protect endangered species,
to preserve the variety of habitats,

and to honour the delicate balance of nature.
God of life: hear our prayer.

We pray for the human family.
We exult in its diversity and giftedness,
we repent of its sins, divisions and violence.
By the power of your Spirit, restore your image within us,
through Christ who came to remake us
by his death and resurrection.
God of life: hear our prayer.

Heavenly Father, you have filled the world with beauty:
open our eyes to behold your gracious hand in all your works;
that, rejoicing in your whole creation,
we may learn to serve you with gladness;
for the sake of him through whom all things were made,
your Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Lord, give to your people grace to hear and keep your word
that, after the example of your servant William Tyndale,
we may not only profess your gospel
but also be ready to suffer and die for it,
to the honour of your name;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Pour out your Spirit, O God, over all the world,
to inspire every heart with knowledge and love of you. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is adapted from _Revised Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts. The closing prayer use phrases from a prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_ (c) Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

William Tyndale was born about 1495 at Slymbridge near the Welsh border.
He received his degrees from Magdalen College, Oxford, and also studied at
Cambridge. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1521, and soon began to
speak of his desire, which eventually became his life's obsession, to translate
the Scriptures into English. It is reported that, in the course of a dispute with a
promminent clergyman who disparaged this proposal, he said, "If God spare
my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plow to know more
of the Scriptures than thou dost." The remainder of his life was devoted to
keeping that vow, or boast. Finding that the King, Henry VIII, was firmly set
against any English version of the Scriptures, he fled to Germany (visiting
Martin Luther in 1525), and there travelled from city to city, in exile, poverty,
persecution, and constant danger. Tyndale understood the commonly received
doctrine -- the popular theology -- of his time to imply that men earn their
salvation by good behavior and by penance. He wrote eloquently in favor of
the view that salvation is a gift of God, freely bestowed, and not a response to
any good act on the part of the receiver. His views are expressed in numerous
pamphlets, and in the introductions to and commentaries on various books of
the Bible that accompanied his translations. He completed his translation of the
New Testament in 1525, and it was printed at Worms and smuggled into
England. Of 18,000 copies, only two survive. In 1534, he produced a revised
version, and began work on the Old Testament. In the next two years he
completed and published the Pentateuch and Jonah, and translated the books
from Joshua through Second Chronicles, but then he was captured (betrayed
by one he had befriended), tried for heresy, and put to death. He was burned at
the stake, but, as was often done, the officer strangled him before lighting the
fire. His last words were, "Lord, open the King of England's eyes."
Miles Coverdale continued Tyndale's work by translating those portions of the
Bible (including the Apocrypha) which Tyndale had not lived to translate
himself, and publishing the complete work. In 1537, the "Matthew Bible"
(essentially the Tyndale-Coverdale Bible under another man's name to spare
the government embarrassment) was published in England with the Royal
Permission. Six copies were set up for public reading in Old St. Paul's Church,
and throughout the daylight hours the church was crowded with those who had
come to hear it. One man would stand at the lectern and read until his voice
gave out, and then he would stand down and another would take his place. All
English translations of the Bible from that time to the present century are
essentially revisions of the Tyndale-Coverdale work. [James Kiefer,
abridged]



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