OREMUS: 17 November 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Nov 16 17:00:00 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for November 17
Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln, 1200

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Lord,
the help of the helpless, 
the hope of those past hope, 
the savior of those tossed by tempests, 
the harbor of the voyager, 
the physician of the sick. 
You are all things to us, 
you know each of us and our need, 
and receive us all into your kingdom, 
making us children of light. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you, 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit: 
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 86

Bow down your ear, O Lord, and answer me,*
 for I am poor and in misery.
Keep watch over my life, for I am faithful;*
 save your servant who trusts in you.
Be merciful to me, O Lord, for you are my God;*
 I call upon you all the day long.
Gladden the soul of your servant,*
 for to you, O Lord, I lift up my soul.
For you, O Lord, are good and forgiving,*
 and great is your love towards all who call upon you.
Give ear, O Lord, to my prayer,*
 and attend to the voice of my supplications.
In the time of my trouble I will call upon you,*
 for you will answer me.
Among the gods there is none like you, O Lord,*
 nor anything like your works.
All nations you have made
   will come and worship you, O Lord,*
 and glorify your name.
For you are great; you do wondrous things;*
 and you alone are God.
Teach me your way, O Lord,
   and I will walk in your truth;*
 knit my heart to you that I may fear your name.
I will thank you, O Lord my God, with all my heart,*
 and glorify your name for evermore.
For great is your love towards me;*
 you have delivered me from the nethermost Pit.
The arrogant rise up against me, O God,
   and a violent band seeks my life;*
 they have not set you before their eyes.
But you, O Lord, are gracious and full of compassion,*
 slow to anger and full of kindness and truth.
Turn to me and have mercy upon me;*
 give your strength to your servant;
   and save the child of your handmaid.
Show me a sign of your favour,
   so that those who hate me may see it and be ashamed;*
 because you, O Lord, have helped me and comforted me.

Psalm 87

On the holy mountain stands the city he has founded;*
 the Lord loves the gates of Zion
   more than all the dwellings of Jacob.
Glorious things are spoken of you,*
 O city of our God.
I count Egypt and Babylon among those who know me;*
 behold Philistia, Tyre and Ethiopia:
   in Zion were they born.
Of Zion it shall be said, 'Everyone was born in her,*
 and the Most High himself shall sustain her.'
The Lord will record as he enrols the peoples,*
 'These also were born there.'
The singers and the dancers will say,*
 'All my fresh springs are in you.'

Psalm 88

O Lord, my God, my Saviour,*
 by day and night I cry to you.
Let my prayer enter into your presence;*
 incline your ear to my lamentation.
For I am full of trouble;*
 my life is at the brink of the grave.
I am counted among those who go down to the Pit;*
 I have become like one who has no strength;
Lost among the dead,*
 like the slain who lie in the grave,
Whom you remember no more,*
 for they are cut off from your hand.
You have laid me in the depths of the Pit,*
 in dark places and in the abyss.
Your anger weighs upon me heavily,*
 and all your great waves overwhelm me.
You have put my friends far from me;
   you have made me to be abhorred by them;*
 I am in prison and cannot get free.
My sight has failed me because of trouble;*
 Lord, I have called upon you daily;
   I have stretched out my hands to you.
Do you work wonders for the dead?*
 will those who have died
   stand up and give you thanks?
Will your lovingkindness be declared in the grave?*
 your faithfulness in the land of destruction?
Will your wonders be known in the dark?*
 or your righteousness in the country
   where all is forgotten?
But as for me, O Lord, I cry to you for help;*
 in the morning my prayer comes before you.
Lord, why have you rejected me?*
 why have you hidden your face from me?
Ever since my youth,
   I have been wretched and at the point of death;*
 I have borne your terrors with a troubled mind.
Your blazing anger has swept over me;*
 your terrors have destroyed me;
They surround me all day long like a flood;*
 they encompass me on every side.
My friend and my neighbour you have put away from me,*
 and darkness is my only companion.

FIRST READING [Job 40:1–24]:

And the Lord said to Job: 
'Shall a fault-finder contend with the Almighty?
   Anyone who argues with God must respond.' 

Then Job answered the Lord: 
'See, I am of small account; what shall I answer you?
   I lay my hand on my mouth. 
I have spoken once, and I will not answer;
   twice, but will proceed no further.' 
 Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind: 
'Gird up your loins like a man;
   I will question you, and you declare to me. 
Will you even put me in the wrong?
   Will you condemn me that you may be justified? 
Have you an arm like God,
   and can you thunder with a voice like his? 

'Deck yourself with majesty and dignity;
   clothe yourself with glory and splendour. 
Pour out the overflowings of your anger,
   and look on all who are proud, and abase them. 
Look on all who are proud, and bring them low;
   tread down the wicked where they stand. 
Hide them all in the dust together;
   bind their faces in the world below. 
Then I will also acknowledge to you
   that your own right hand can give you victory. 

'Look at Behemoth,
   which I made just as I made you;
   it eats grass like an ox. 
Its strength is in its loins,
   and its power in the muscles of its belly. 
It makes its tail stiff like a cedar;
   the sinews of its thighs are knit together. 
Its bones are tubes of bronze,
   its limbs like bars of iron. 

'It is the first of the great acts of God—
   only its Maker can approach it with the sword. 
For the mountains yield food for it
   where all the wild animals play. 
Under the lotus plants it lies,
   in the covert of the reeds and in the marsh. 
The lotus trees cover it for shade;
   the willows of the wadi surround it. 
Even if the river is turbulent, it is not frightened;
   it is confident though Jordan rushes against its mouth. 
Can one take it with hooks
   or pierce its nose with a snare? 

HYMN 
Words: Anonymous
Tune: Chapel Royal

Spirit of wisdom, turn our eyes
>From earth and earthly vanities
To heavenly truth and love;
Spirit of understanding true,
Our souls with heavenly light endue
To seek the things above.

Spirit of counsel, be our guide;
Teach us, by earthly struggles tried,
Our heavenly crown to win;
Spirit of fortitude, thy power
Be with us in temptation's hour,
To keep us pure from sin.

Spirit of knowledge, lead our feet
In thine own paths, so safe and sweet,
By angel footsteps trod;
Where thou our guardian true shalt be,
Spirit of gentle piety,
To keep us close to God.

Through all our life be ever near,
Spirit of God's most holy fear,
In our heart's inmost shrine;
Our souls with aweful reverence fill,
To worship his most holy will,
All-righteous and divine.

So lead us, Lord, through peace or strife,
Onward to everlasting life,
To win our high reward:
So may we fight our lifelong fight,
Strong in thine own unearthly might,
And reign with Christ our Lord.

SECOND READING [1 Timothy 4:1-16]:

Now the Spirit expressly says that in later times some will renounce the faith by paying attention to deceitful spirits and teachings of demons, through the hypocrisy of liars whose consciences are seared with a hot iron. They forbid marriage and demand abstinence from foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth. For everything created by God is good, and nothing is to be rejected, provided it is received with thanksgiving; for it is sanctified by God's word and by prayer. 

If you put these instructions before the brothers and sisters, you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus, nourished on the words of the faith and of the sound teaching that you have followed. Have nothing to do with profane myths and old wives' tales. Train yourself in godliness, for, while physical training is of some value, godliness is valuable in every way, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come. The saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance. For to this end we toil and struggle, because we have our hope set on the living God, who is the Saviour of all people, especially of those who believe. 

These are the things you must insist on and teach. Let no one despise your youth, but set the believers an example in speech and conduct, in love, in faith, in purity. Until I arrive, give attention to the public reading of scripture, to exhorting, to teaching. Do not neglect the gift that is in you, which was given to you through prophecy with the laying on of hands by the council of elders. Put these things into practice, devote yourself to them, so that all may see your progress. Pay close attention to yourself and to your teaching; continue in these things, for in doing this you will save both yourself and your hearers.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
God our Father,
you gave your Son, Jesus Christ
to share our life on earth,
to grow in wisdom,
to toil with his hands,
and to make known the ways of your kingdom.

We pray for the community
those who work....
the unemployed....
those in education....
those in research....
those in communications....
those who maintain the life of the community....
the Church, especially 

God our Father, we give you thanks
for Christ's revelation of yourself,
his care for people,
and his joy in obedience....
for the value he gave to human labour,
the strength he promised us for service,
the call to follow in his way....
for all opportunities of work and of leisure,
all truth that we have learned,
and all discoveries that we have made....

Give us growing reverence for the truth,
and such wisdom in the use of knowledge
that your kingdom may be advanced
and your name glorified;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O God,
who endowed your servant Hugh
with a wise and cheerful boldness
and taught him to commend to earthly rulers
the discipline of a holy life:
give us grace like him to be bold in the service of the gospel,
putting our confidence in Christ alone,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

The love of the Lord Jesus draw us to himself;
the power of the Lord Jesus strengthen us in his service;
the joy of the Lord Jesus fill our hearts. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is from the Liturgy of St. Basil and the closing prayer is from _Uniting in Worship 2_

Hugh was born at Avalon in Burgundy in 1140 and at first made his profession with the Augustinian canons but, when he was twenty-five, he became a monk at Grande Chartreuse. In about 1175, he was invited by the English king, Henry II, to become prior of his Charterhouse foundation at Witham in Somerset, badly in need of reform even though it had been only recently founded. In 1186, Hugh was persuaded to accept the See of Lincoln, then the largest diocese in the land. He brought huge energy to the diocese and, together with discerning appointments to key posts, he revived the Lincoln schools, repaired and enlarged the cathedral, visited the See extensively, drew together the clergy to meet in synod and generally brought an efficiency and stability to the Church which was to be much emulated. Hugh also showed great compassion for the poor and the oppressed, ensuring that sufferers of leprosy were cared for and that Jews were not persecuted. He both supported his monarch and also held out against any royal measures he felt to be extreme, yet managing not to make an enemy of the king. He died in London on this day in the year 1200. [Exciting Holiness]



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