OREMUS: 8 June 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Jun 7 23:12:05 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Tuesday, June 8, 2010
Thomas Ken, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Non-Juror, Hymn Writer, 1711

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O Lord,
full of compassion and mercy,
slow to anger and of great kindness.
You have not dealt with us according to our sins,
your mercy is great upon those who fear you.
In your Son Jesus Christ you have redeemed
our life from the grave and crowned us with mercy and loving-kindness.
You satisfy us with good things,
and our youth is renewed like an eagle's.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 32

Happy are they whose transgressions are forgiven,*
 and whose sin is put away!
Happy are they to whom the Lord imputes no guilt,*
 and in whose spirit there is no guile!
While I held my tongue, my bones withered away,*
 because of my groaning all day long.
For your hand was heavy upon me day and night;*
 my moisture was dried up as in the heat of summer.
Then I acknowledged my sin to you,*
 and did not conceal my guilt.
I said, 'I will confess my transgressions to the Lord';*
 then you forgave me the guilt of my sin.
Therefore all the faithful will make their prayers to you
   in time of trouble;*
 when the great waters overflow, they shall not reach them.
You are my hidingplace;
   you preserve me from trouble;*
 you surround me with shouts of deliverance.
'I will instruct you and teach you
   in the way that you should go;*
 I will guide you with my eye.
'Do not be like horse or mule,
   which have no understanding;*
 who must be fitted with bit and bridle,
   or else they will not stay near you.'
Great are the tribulations of the wicked;*
 but mercy embraces those who trust in the Lord.
Be glad, you righteous, and rejoice in the Lord;*
 shout for joy, all who are true of heart.

Psalm 33

Rejoice in the Lord, you righteous;*
 it is good for the just to sing praises.
Praise the Lord with the harp;*
 play to him upon the psaltery and lyre.
Sing for him a new song;*
 sound a fanfare with all your skill upon the trumpet.
For the word of the Lord is right,*
 and all his works are sure.
He loves righteousness and justice;*
 the lovingkindness of the Lord fills the whole earth.
By the word of the Lord were the heavens made,*
 by the breath of his mouth all the heavenly hosts.
He gathers up the waters of the ocean
   as in a waterskin*
 and stores up the depths of the sea.
Let all the earth fear the Lord;*
 let all who dwell in the world stand in awe of him.
For he spoke and it came to pass;*
 he commanded and it stood fast.
The Lord brings the will of the nations to naught;*
 he thwarts the designs of the peoples.
But the Lord's will stands fast for ever,*
 and the designs of his heart from age to age.
Happy is the nation whose God is the Lord!*
 happy the people he has chosen to be his own!
The Lord looks down from heaven,*
 and beholds all the people in the world.
>From where he sits enthroned he turns his gaze*
 on all who dwell on the earth.
He fashions all the hearts of them*
 and understands all their works.
There is no king that can be saved by a mighty army;*
 the strong are not delivered by great strength.nbsp;
The horse is a vain hope for deliverance;*
 for all its strength it cannot save.
Behold, the eye of the Lord
   is upon those who fear him,*
 on those who wait upon his love,
To pluck their lives from death,*
 and to feed them in time of famine.
Our soul waits for the Lord;*
 he is our help and our shield.Indeed, our heart rejoices in him,*
 for in his holy name we put our trust.
Let your lovingkindness, O Lord, be upon us,*
 as we have put our trust in you.

Psalm 34

I will bless the Lord at all times;*
 his praise shall ever be in my mouth.
I will glory in the Lord;*
 let the humble hear and rejoice.
Proclaim with me the greatness of the Lord;*
 let us exalt his name together.
I sought the Lord and he answered me*
 and delivered me out of all my terror.
Look upon him and be radiant,*
 and let not your faces be ashamed.
I called in my affliction and the Lord heard me*
 and saved me from all my troubles.
The angel of the Lord
   encompasses those who fear him,*
 and he will deliver them.
Taste and see that the Lord is good;*
 happy are they who trust in him!
Fear the Lord, you that are his saints,*
 for those who fear him lack nothing.
The young lions lack and suffer hunger,*
 but those who seek the Lord
   lack nothing that is good.
Come, children, and listen to me;*
 I will teach you the fear of the Lord.
Who among you loves life*
 and desires long life to enjoy prosperity?
Keep your tongue from evilspeaking*
 and your lips from lying words.
Turn from evil and do good;*
 seek peace and pursue it.
The eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous,*
 and his ears are open to their cry.
The face of the Lord is against those who do evil,*
 to root out the remembrance of them from the earth.
The righteous cry and the Lord hears them*
 and delivers them from all their troubles.
The Lord is near to the brokenhearted*
 and will save those whose spirits are crushed.
Many are the troubles of the righteous,*
 but the Lord will deliver him out of them all.
He will keep safe all his bones;*
 not one of them shall be broken.
Evil shall slay the wicked,*
 and those who hate the righteous will be punished.
The Lord ransoms the life of his servants,*
 and none will be punished who trust in him.

FIRST READING [Num. 22:15-21, 36-40]:

Once again Balak sent officials, more numerous and more distinguished than these. They came to Balaam and said to him, 'Thus says Balak son of Zippor: “Do not let anything hinder you from coming to me; for I will surely do you great honour, and whatever you say to me I will do; come, curse this people for me.” ' But Balaam replied to the servants of Balak, 'Although Balak were to give me his house full of silver and gold, I could not go beyond the command of the Lord my God, to do less or more. You remain here, as the others did, so that I may learn what more the Lord may say to me.' That night God came to Balaam and said to him, 'If the men have come to summon you, get up and go with them; but do only what I tell you to do.' So Balaam got up in the morning, saddled his donkey, and went with the officials of Moab. 

When Balak heard that Balaam had come, he went out to meet him at Ir-moab, on the boundary formed by the Arnon, at the farthest point of the boundary. Balak said to Balaam, 'Did I not send to summon you? Why did you not come to me? Am I not able to honour you?' Balaam said to Balak, 'I have come to you now, but do I have power to say just anything? The word God puts in my mouth, that is what I must say.' Then Balaam went with Balak, and they came to Kiriath-huzoth. Balak sacrificed oxen and sheep, and sent them to Balaam and to the officials who were with him. 

HYMN 
Words: Thomas Ken, 1695, 1709
Tune: Morning Hymn
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/a/a408.html
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Awake, my soul, and with the sun
thy daily stage of duty run;
shake off dull sloth, and joyful rise
to pay thy morning sacrifice.

Lord, I my vows to thee renew;
disperse my sins as morning dew;
guard my first springs of thought and will,
and with thyself my spirit fill.

Direct, control, suggest, this day,
all I design or do or say;
that all my powers, with all their might,
in thy sole glory may unite.

Praise God, from whom all blessings flow;
praise him, all creatures here below;
praise him above, ye heavenly host:
praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.

SECOND READING [Acts 9:20-31]:

Immediately Saul began to proclaim Jesus in the synagogues, saying, 'He is the Son of God.' All who heard him were amazed and said, 'Is not this the man who made havoc in Jerusalem among those who invoked this name? And has he not come here for the purpose of bringing them bound before the chief priests?' Saul became increasingly more powerful and confounded the Jews who lived in Damascus by proving that Jesus was the Messiah. 

After some time had passed, the Jews plotted to kill him, but their plot became known to Saul. They were watching the gates day and night so that they might kill him; but his disciples took him by night and let him down through an opening in the wall, lowering him in a basket. 

When he had come to Jerusalem, he attempted to join the disciples; and they were all afraid of him, for they did not believe that he was a disciple. But Barnabas took him, brought him to the apostles, and described for them how on the road he had seen the Lord, who had spoken to him, and how in Damascus he had spoken boldly in the name of Jesus. So he went in and out among them in Jerusalem, speaking boldly in the name of the Lord. He spoke and argued with the Hellenists; but they were attempting to kill him. When the believers learned of it, they brought him down to Caesarea and sent him off to Tarsus. 

Meanwhile the church throughout Judea, Galilee, and Samaria had peace and was built up. Living in the fear of the Lord and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit, it increased in numbers. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We pray to God our Father, saying:
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

For all Christian people, knit together by your word of life;
and for all who teach and guard the faith:
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

For those who study and translate the Scriptures:
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

For those who are mocked and persecuted for their faith:
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

For those who long to know you, and your living Word:
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

For those tempted to forsake your way;
for those whose hearts are hardened and unfeeling,
and for those who threaten war:
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

For those bowed down with grief, fear or sickness, (especially. . .)
Lord, may your word dwell richly in their hearts.

Giving thanks for those who have died in the faith of Christ,
we rejoice with the ever-blessed Virgin Mary and all your saints,
trusting in the promise of your word fulfilled.
Lord of the Church:
hear our prayer,
and make us one in heart and mind
to serve you in Christ our Lord. Amen.

O God, from whom all blessings flow,
by whose providence we are kept
and by whose grace we are directed:
help us, through the example of your servant Thomas Ken,
faithfully to keep your word,
humbly to accept adversity
and steadfastly to worship you;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless God's holy name.
Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all that God has done.
Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from Psalm 103.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Thomas Ken in the course of his lifetime was both rewarded and punished for
his firm adherence to principle. He was born in 1637 and reared by his
half-sister Anne and her husband the well-known angler Izaak Walton. He
became a clergyman and served for a year at the Hague as chaplain to Mary,
Princess of England and Queen of Holland, niece of King Charles II of England
and wife of the Dutch King William of Orange. During this year he publicly
rebuked King William for his treatment of his wife the said Mary, which may
be why he was chaplain there for only a year. Upon his return to England, he
was made Royal Chaplain to King Charles. The King had a mistress, Nell
Gwyn, and for his convenience wished to lodge her in his chaplain's residence.
Thomas sent the King a sharp refusal, saying that it was not suitable that the
Royal Chaplain should double as the Royal Pimp. Charles admired his honesty
and bluntness, and when the bishopric of Bath and Wells became available
soon after, he declared, "None shall have it but that little man who refused
lodging to poor Nellie!" Ken was accordingly made a bishop. When Charles
was on his deathbed, it was Ken whom he asked to be with him and prepare
him for death.
Under the next king, James II, brother of Charles, matters were different.
James converted to Roman Catholicism, the religion of his mother, and
political turmoil followed. James issued a decree known as the Declaration of
Indulgence, which decreed that various public offices formerly open only to
Anglicans, should thereafter be open to all persons. It was feared that the King
would appoint large numbers of Roman Catholics to positions of power, and
eventually transfer to them the control of the government. When the King
commanded the bishops to proclaim the Declaration of Indulgence, seven of
them refused to do so and were by the King's command imprisoned in the
Tower of London. The people of London rioted, and the bishops were freed
and carried in triumph through the streets of the city. Soon after, Parliament
offered the crown to the King's daughter Mary and her husband William of
Orange and James fled into exile.
William and Mary naturally began their reign by demanding oaths of allegiance
from all persons holding public positions, including the bishops. Thomas Ken
and others (known as the Non-Jurors -- the older meaning of "juror" is "one
who takes an oath," hence "perjurer" as "one who swears falsely") refused to
take the oath, on the grounds that they had sworn allegiance to James, and
could not during his lifetime swear allegiance to another monarch without
making such oaths a mockery. They were accordingly put out of office.
Thomas Ken became a private tutor and spent the rest of his life in retirement.
He died 19 March 1711. [James Kiefer, abridged]



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