OREMUS: 21 July 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Jul 20 17:00:00 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Wednesday, July 21, 2010

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
the source and end of all things:
in the resurrection of Christ
you reveal the first fruits of the Spirit,
the pledge of things to come.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 105

Give thanks to the Lord and call upon his name;*
 make known his deeds among the peoples.
Sing to him, sing praises to him,*
 and speak of all his marvellous works.
Glory in his holy name;*
 let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice.
Search for the Lord and his strength;*
 continually seek his face.
Remember the marvels he has done,*
 his wonders and the judgements of his mouth,
O offspring of Abraham his servant,*
 O children of Jacob his chosen.
He is the Lord our God;*
 his judgements prevail in all the world.
He has always been mindful of his covenant,*
 the promise he made for a thousand generations:
The covenant he made with Abraham,*
 the oath that he swore to Isaac,
Which he established as a statute for Jacob,*
 an everlasting covenant for Israel,
Saying, 'To you will I give the land of Canaan*
 to be your allotted inheritance.'
When they were few in number,*
 of little account and sojourners in the land,
Wandering from nation to nation*
 and from one kingdom to another,
He let no one oppress them*
 and rebuked kings for their sake,
Saying, 'Do not touch my anointed*
 and do my prophets no harm.'
Then he called for a famine in the land*
 and destroyed the supply of bread.
He sent a man before them,*
 Joseph, who was sold as a slave.
They bruised his feet in fetters;*
 his neck they put in an iron collar.
Until his prediction came to pass,*
 the word of the Lord tested him.
The king sent and released him;*
 the ruler of the peoples set him free.
He set him as master over his household,*
 as a ruler over all his possessions,
To instruct his princes according to his will*
 and to teach his elders wisdom.
Israel came into Egypt,*
 and Jacob became a sojourner in the land of Ham.
The Lord made his people exceedingly fruitful;*
 he made them stronger than their enemies;
Whose heart he turned, so that they hated his people,*
 and dealt unjustly with his servants.
He sent Moses his servant,*
 and Aaron whom he had chosen.
They worked his signs among them,*
 and portents in the land of Ham.
He sent darkness and it grew dark;*
 but the Egyptians rebelled against his words.
He turned their waters into blood*
 and caused their fish to die.
Their land was overrun by frogs,*
 in the very chambers of their kings.
He spoke and there came swarms of insects*
 and gnats within all their borders.
He gave them hailstones instead of rain,*
 and flames of fire throughout their land.
He blasted their vines and their fig trees*
 and shattered every tree in their country.
He spoke and the locust came,*
 and young locusts without number,
Which ate up all the green plants in their land*
 and devoured the fruit of their soil.
He struck down the firstborn of their land,*
 the firstfruits of all their strength.
He led out his people with silver and gold;*
 in all their tribes there was not one that stumbled.
Egypt was glad of their going,*
 because they were afraid of them.
He spread out a cloud for a covering*
 and a fire to give light in the night season.
They asked and quails appeared,*
 and he satisfied them with bread from heaven.
He opened the rock and water flowed,*
 so the river ran in the dry places.
For God remembered his holy word*
 and Abraham his servant.
So he led forth his people with gladness,*
 his chosen with shouts of joy.
He gave his people the lands of the nations,*
 and they took the fruit of others' toil,
That they might keep his statutes*
 and observe his laws.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [1 Sam. 9:11-21]:

As Saul and the boy went up the hill to the town, they met some girls coming out to draw water, and said to them, 'Is the seer here?' They answered, 'Yes, there he is just ahead of you. Hurry; he has come just now to the town, because the people have a sacrifice today at the shrine. As soon as you enter the town, you will find him, before he goes up to the shrine to eat. For the people will not eat until he comes, since he must bless the sacrifice; afterwards those eat who are invited. Now go up, for you will meet him immediately.' So they went up to the town. As they were entering the town, they saw Samuel coming out towards them on his way up to the shrine. 

Now the day before Saul came, the Lord had revealed to Samuel: 'Tomorrow about this time I will send to you a man from the land of Benjamin, and you shall anoint him to be ruler over my people Israel. He shall save my people from the hand of the Philistines; for I have seen the suffering of my people, because their outcry has come to me.' When Samuel saw Saul, the Lord told him, 'Here is the man of whom I spoke to you. He it is who shall rule over my people.' Then Saul approached Samuel inside the gate, and said, 'Tell me, please, where is the house of the seer?' Samuel answered Saul, 'I am the seer; go up before me to the shrine, for today you shall eat with me, and in the morning I will let you go and will tell you all that is on your mind. As for your donkeys that were lost three days ago, give no further thought to them, for they have been found. And on whom is all Israel's desire fixed, if not on you and on all your ancestral house?' Saul answered, 'I am only a Benjaminite, from the least of the tribes of Israel, and my family is the humblest of all the families of the tribe of Benjamin. Why then have you spoken to me in this way?' 

HYMN 
Words: John Newton (1725-1807)
Tune: Nativity, Saint Peter, Saint Botolph, Song 67, Stracathro

How sweet the name of Jesus sounds 
in a believer's ear!
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
and drives away his fear.

It makes the wounded spirit whole,
and calms the troubled breast;
'tis manna to the hungry soul,
and to the weary rest.

Dear name! the rock on which I build,
my shield and hiding-place,
my never-failing treasury filled
with boundless stores of grace.

Jesus! my Shepherd, Husband, Friend,
my Prophet, Priest, and King,
my Lord, my Life, my Way, my End,
accept the praise I bring.

Weak is the effort of my heart,
and cold my warmest thought;
but when I see thee as thou art,
I'll praise thee as I ought.

`Till then I would thy love proclaim
with every fleeting breath;
and may the music of thy name
refresh my soul in death.

SECOND READING [Acts 23:25-24:9]:

The tribune wrote a letter to this effect:  'Claudius Lysias to his Excellency the governor Felix, greetings. This man was seized by the Jews and was about to be killed by them, but when I had learned that he was a Roman citizen, I came with the guard and rescued him. Since I wanted to know the charge for which they accused him, I had him brought to their council. I found that he was accused concerning questions of their law, but was charged with nothing deserving death or imprisonment. When I was informed that there would be a plot against the man, I sent him to you at once, ordering his accusers also to state before you what they have against him.' 

So the soldiers, according to their instructions, took Paul and brought him during the night to Antipatris. The next day they let the horsemen go on with him, while they returned to the barracks. When they came to Caesarea and delivered the letter to the governor, they presented Paul also before him. On reading the letter, he asked what province he belonged to, and when he learned that he was from Cilicia, he said, 'I will give you a hearing when your accusers arrive.' Then he ordered that he be kept under guard in Herod's headquarters. 

Five days later the high priest Ananias came down with some elders and an attorney, a certain Tertullus, and they reported their case against Paul to the governor. When Paul had been summoned, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying: 'Your Excellency, because of you we have long enjoyed peace, and reforms have been made for this people because of your foresight. We welcome this in every way and everywhere with utmost gratitude. But, to detain you no further, I beg you to hear us briefly with your customary graciousness. We have, in fact, found this man a pestilent fellow, an agitator among all the Jews throughout the world, and a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes. He even tried to profane the temple, and so we seized him. By examining him yourself you will be able to learn from him concerning everything of which we accuse him.'  The Jews also joined in the charge by asserting that all this was true. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Give us your peace, O God, that we may rejoice in your
goodness to us and to all your children, and be thankful
for your love revealed in Jesus Christ.
Especially we thank you for
     people who reveal your truth and righteousness...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     courage to be bold disciples...
     those who show hospitality...
     surprises that have blessed us...
     the unity of the church of Jesus Christ...

Give us your peace, O God, that we may be confident of
your care for us and all your children, as we remember
the needs of others. Especially we pray for
     friends and relatives who are far away... 

                              (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     neighbors in special need...
     those who suffer hunger and thirst...
     those who work at night while others sleep...
     Episcopal and Methodist churches...

Merciful God,
you brought your people out of slavery
and led them to freedom in the promised land;
feed us on our journey with the bread of heaven
that we may hunger and thirst for righteousness
until your kingdom comes;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Enrich us abundantly with your grace, O Lord,
that, firm in faith, secure in hope, and constant in love,
we may keep your commandments with watchful care. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is adapted by Stephen Benner from
_We Give You Thanks and Praise: The Ambrosian Eucharistic
Prefaces_, translated by Alan Griffiths, (c) The Canterbury Press
Norwich, 1999.

The closing prayer uses a sentence from a prayer in _Opening Prayers:
Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.



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