OREMUS: 18 July 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sat Jul 17 17:00:01 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Sunday, July 18, 2010
The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
the source and end of all things:
in the resurrection of Christ
you reveal the first fruits of the Spirit,
the pledge of things to come.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 90

Lord, you have been our refuge*
 from one generation to another.
Before the mountains were brought forth,
   or the land and the earth were born,*
 from age to age you are God.
You turn us back to the dust and say,*
 'Go back, O child of earth.'
For a thousand years in your sight
   are like yesterday when it is past*
 and like a watch in the night.
You sweep us away like a dream;*
 we fade away suddenly like the grass.
In the morning it is green and flourishes;*
 in the evening it is dried up and withered.
For we consume away in your displeasure;*
 we are afraid because of your wrathful indignation.
Our iniquities you have set before you,*
 and our secret sins in the light of your countenance.
When you are angry, all our days are gone;*
 we bring our years to an end like a sigh.
The span of our life is seventy years,
   perhaps in strength even eighty;*
 yet the sum of them is but labour and sorrow,
   for they pass away quickly and we are gone.
Who regards the power of your wrath?*
 who rightly fears your indignation?
So teach us to number our days*
 that we may apply our hearts to wisdom.
Return, O Lord; how long will you tarry?*
 be gracious to your servants.
Satisfy us by your lovingkindness in the morning;*
 so shall we rejoice and be glad all the days of our life.
Make us glad by the measure of the days
   that you afflicted us*
 and the years in which we suffered adversity.
Show your servants your works*
 and your splendour to their children.
May the graciousness of the Lord our God be upon us;*
 prosper the work of our hands;
   prosper our handiwork.

Psalm 91

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High,*
 abides under the shadow of the Almighty.
He shall say to the Lord,
   'You are my refuge and my stronghold,*
 my God in whom I put my trust.'
He shall deliver you from the snare of the hunter*
 and from the deadly pestilence.
He shall cover you with his pinions,
   and you shall find refuge under his wings;*
 his faithfulness shall be a shield and buckler.
You shall not be afraid of any terror by night,*
 nor of the arrow that flies by day;
Of the plague that stalks in the darkness,*
 nor of the sickness that lays waste at midday.
A thousand shall fall at your side
   and ten thousand at your right hand,*
 but it shall not come near you.
Your eyes have only to behold*
 to see the reward of the wicked.
Because you have made the Lord your refuge,*
 and the Most High your habitation.
There shall no evil happen to you,*
 neither shall any plague come near your dwelling.
For he shall give his angels charge over you,*
 to keep you in all your ways.
They shall bear you in their hands,*
 lest you dash your foot against a stone.
You shall tread upon the lion and adder;*
 you shall trample the young lion and the serpent
   under your feet.
Because he is bound to me in love,
   therefore will I deliver him;*
 I will protect him, because he knows my name.
He shall call upon me and I will answer him;*
 I am with him in trouble,
   I will rescue him and bring him to honour.
With long life will I satisfy him,*
 and show him my salvation.

Psalm 92

It is a good thing to give thanks to the Lord,*
 and to sing praises to your name, O Most High;
To tell of your lovingkindness early in the morning*
 and of your faithfulness in the night season;
On the psaltery and on the lyre*
 and to the melody of the harp.
For you have made me glad by your acts, O Lord;*
 and I shout for joy because of the works of your hands.
Lord, how great are your works!*
 your thoughts are very deep.
The dullard does not know,
   nor does the fool understand,*
 that though the wicked grow like weeds,
   and all the workers of iniquity flourish,
They flourish only to be destroyed for ever;*
 but you, O Lord, are exalted for evermore.
For lo, your enemies, O Lord,
   lo, your enemies shall perish,*
 and all the workers of iniquity shall be scattered.
But my horn you have exalted
   like the horns of wild bulls;*
 I am anointed with fresh oil.
My eyes also gloat over my enemies,*
 and my ears rejoice to hear the doom of the wicked
   who rise up against me.
The righteous shall flourish like a palm tree,*
 and shall spread abroad like a cedar of Lebanon.
Those who are planted in the house of the Lord*
 shall flourish in the courts of our God;
They shall still bear fruit in old age;*
 they shall be green and succulent;
That they may show how upright the Lord is,*
 my rock, in whom there is no fault.

FIRST READING [Genesis 41.1-16,25-37]:

After two whole years, Pharaoh dreamed that he was standing by the Nile, and there came up out of the Nile seven sleek and fat cows, and they grazed in the reed grass. Then seven other cows, ugly and thin, came up out of the Nile after them, and stood by the other cows on the bank of the Nile. The ugly and thin cows ate up the seven sleek and fat cows. And Pharaoh awoke. Then he fell asleep and dreamed a second time; seven ears of grain, plump and good, were growing on one stalk. Then seven ears, thin and blighted by the east wind, sprouted after them. The thin ears swallowed up the seven plump and full ears. Pharaoh awoke, and it was a dream. In the morning his spirit was troubled; so he sent and called for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men. Pharaoh told them his dreams, but there was no one who could interpret them to Pharaoh. 

Then the chief cupbearer said to Pharaoh, 'I remember my faults today. Once Pharaoh was angry with his servants, and put me and the chief baker in custody in the house of the captain of the guard. We dreamed on the same night, he and I, each having a dream with its own meaning. A young Hebrew was there with us, a servant of the captain of the guard. When we told him, he interpreted our dreams to us, giving an interpretation to each according to his dream. As he interpreted to us, so it turned out; I was restored to my office, and the baker was hanged.' 

Then Pharaoh sent for Joseph, and he was hurriedly brought out of the dungeon. When he had shaved himself and changed his clothes, he came in before Pharaoh. And Pharaoh said to Joseph, 'I have had a dream, and there is no one who can interpret it. I have heard it said of you that when you hear a dream you can interpret it.' Joseph answered Pharaoh, 'It is not I; God will give Pharaoh a favourable answer.' 

Then Joseph said to Pharaoh, 'Pharaoh's dreams are one and the same; God has revealed to Pharaoh what he is about to do. The seven good cows are seven years, and the seven good ears are seven years; the dreams are one. The seven lean and ugly cows that came up after them are seven years, as are the seven empty ears blighted by the east wind. They are seven years of famine. It is as I told Pharaoh; God has shown to Pharaoh what he is about to do. There will come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt. After them there will arise seven years of famine, and all the plenty will be forgotten in the land of Egypt; the famine will consume the land. The plenty will no longer be known in the land because of the famine that will follow, for it will be very grievous. And the doubling of Pharaoh's dream means that the thing is fixed by God, and God will shortly bring it about. Now therefore let Pharaoh select a man who is discerning and wise, and set him over the land of Egypt. Let Pharaoh proceed to appoint overseers over the land, and take one-fifth of the produce of the land of Egypt during the seven plenteous years. Let them gather all the food of these good years that are coming, and lay up grain under the authority of Pharaoh for food in the cities, and let them keep it. That food shall be a reserve for the land against the seven years of famine that are to befall the land of Egypt, so that the land may not perish through the famine.' 

The proposal pleased Pharaoh and all his servants. 

HYMN 
Words: Sydney Henry Knight (b. 1923) © S.H. Knight
Tune: Calon Lan (87 87 D)

When the summer sun is shining
Over golden land and sea,
And the flowers in the hedgerow
Welcome butterfly and bee;
Then my open heart is glowing,
Full of warmth for everyone,
And I feel an inner beauty
Which reflects the summer sun.

When the light of summer sunshine
Streams in through the open door,
Casting shadows of tree-branches,
Living patterns on the floor;
Then my heart is full of gladness,
And my soul is light and gay,
And my life is overflowing
Like the happy summer day.

When the summer clouds of thunder
Bring the long-awaited rain,
And the thirsty soil is moistened,
And the grass is green again;
Then I long for summer sunshine,
But I know that clouds and tears
Are a part of life's refreshment,
Like the rainbow's hopes and fears.

When, beneath the trees of summer,
Under leafy shade I lie,
Breathing in the scent of flowers,
Sheltered from the sun-hot sky;
Then my heart is all contentment,
And my soul is quiet and still,
Soothed by whispering, lazy breezes,
Like the grasses on the hill.

In the cool of summer evening,
When the dancing insects play,
And in garden, street and meadow
Linger echoes of the day;
Then my heart is full of yearning,
Hopes and memories flood the whole
Of my being, reaching inwards
To the corners of my soul.

SECOND READING [1 Corinthians 4.8-13]:

Already you have all you want! Already you have become rich! Quite apart from us you have become kings! Indeed, I wish that you had become kings, so that we might be kings with you! For I think that God has exhibited us apostles as last of all, as though sentenced to death, because we have become a spectacle to the world, to angels and to mortals. We are fools for the sake of Christ, but you are wise in Christ. We are weak, but you are strong. You are held in honour, but we in disrepute. To the present hour we are hungry and thirsty, we are poorly clothed and beaten and homeless, and we grow weary from the work of our own hands. When reviled, we bless; when persecuted, we endure; when slandered, we speak kindly. We have become like the rubbish of the world, the dregs of all things, to this very day.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
O God Our Creator, 
you have graced us with the gift of life and a world to live in. 
Empower and strengthen the witness of your church 
that, true to its calling, it may proclaim 
your radical and boundless love, in word and deed. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

Saving God, 
you nourish and sustain us by Word and Sacrament. 
Strengthen all the people of our church, 
especially our bishops, priests and deacons. 
Grant that, sustained in you, our service and witness in this land 
may be full of faith and love. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

O God, Source of our life, 
you have adopted us in the waters of baptism 
and made us your own in love. 
We pray that we may embrace our lives and the lives of others 
with courage and compassion, unafraid of joy and pain, sickness and health. 
May your care be made known in our care. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

God of Justice, 
you revealed your power in the servanthood of Jesus. 
May those who govern the nations use their authority

in wisdom, kindness and peace. 
Awaken in all who govern a thirst for justice 
that embodies your care for this earth and the human community. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

Liberating God, 
you are the hope of the weak and the needy. 
Rescue those who suffer poverty, injustice or oppression when they cry out. 
Open the ears of our hearts to hear 
and quicken in us the fire to respond in love. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

Compassionate One, 
you are a wellspring of comfort and healing. 
Grant comfort, healing and release 
to those who suffer illness, distress or grief. 
Awaken in us boundless compassion 
and use us as agents of lovingkindness. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

God of all generations, 
we thank you for the gift of the lives 
and the loving service of all who have died. 
Keep us in the bonds of love with all the saints throughout the ages 
and bring us to the fullness of your reign. 
We pray in Jesus' name. Amen. 

O God of Love, 
hear the prayers of your people. 
Enliven us by your Spirit, to live into the fullness of your reign. 
We pray through Jesus, our life and our hope. Amen. 

Eternal God, 
you draw near to us in Christ 
and make yourself our guest: 
Amid the cares of our daily lives, 
make us attentive to your voice and alert to your presence, 
that we may treasure your word above all else. 
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, 
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, 
God forever and ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Enrich us abundantly with your grace, O Lord,
that, firm in faith, secure in hope, and constant in love,
we may keep your commandments with watchful care. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is adapted by Stephen Benner from
_We Give You Thanks and Praise: The Ambrosian Eucharistic
Prefaces_, translated by Alan Griffiths, (c) The Canterbury Press
Norwich, 1999.

The closing prayer uses a sentence from a prayer in _Opening Prayers:
Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.



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