OREMUS: 13 August 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Aug 12 22:53:16 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Thursday, August 13, 2010
Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of Down and Connor, Teacher of the Faith, 1667

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O Lord,
from the rising of the sun to its going down,
your Name is praised,
for you have raised us from the dust and set before us
the vision of your glory.
As you bestowed upon us the dignity of a royal priesthood,
you lift up our hearts to celebrate your praise.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 69

Save me, O God,*
 for the waters have risen up to my neck.
I am sinking in deep mire,*
 and there is no firm ground for my feet.
I have come into deep waters,*
 and the torrent washes over me.
I have grown weary with my crying;
   my throat is inflamed;*
 my eyes have failed from looking for my God.
Those who hate me without a cause
   are more than the hairs of my head;
   my lying foes who would destroy me are mighty.*
 Must I then give back what I never stole?
O God, you know my foolishness,*
 and my faults are not hidden from you.
Let not those who hope in you
   be put to shame through me, Lord God of hosts;*
 let not those who seek you be disgraced because of me,
   O God of Israel.
Surely, for your sake have I suffered reproach,*
 and shame has covered my face.
I have become a stranger to my own kindred,*
 an alien to my mother's children.
Zeal for your house has eaten me up;*
 the scorn of those who scorn you has fallen upon me.
I humbled myself with fasting,*
 but that was turned to my reproach.
I put on sackcloth also,*
 and became a byword among them.
Those who sit at the gate murmur against me,*
 and the drunkards make songs about me.
But as for me, this is my prayer to you,*
 at the time you have set, O Lord:
'In your great mercy, O God,*
 answer me with your unfailing help.
'Save me from the mire; do not let me sink;*
 let me be rescued from those who hate me
   and out of the deep waters.
'Let not the torrent of waters wash over me,
   neither let the deep swallow me up;*
 do not let the Pit shut its mouth upon me.
'Answer me, O Lord, for your love is kind;*
 in your great compassion, turn to me.
'Hide not your face from your servant;*
 be swift and answer me, for I am in distress.
'Draw near to me and redeem me;*
 because of my enemies deliver me.
'You know my reproach, my shame and my dishonour;*
 my adversaries are all in your sight.'
Reproach has broken my heart and it cannot be healed;*
 I looked for sympathy, but there was none,
   for comforters, but I could find no one.
They gave me gall to eat,*
 and when I was thirsty, they gave me vinegar to drink.
As for me, I am afflicted and in pain;*
 your help, O God, will lift me up on high.
I will praise the name of God in song;*
 I will proclaim his greatness with thanksgiving.
This will please the Lord more than an offering of oxen,*
 more than bullocks with horns and hoofs.
The afflicted shall see and be glad;*
 you who seek God, your heart shall live.
For the Lord listens to the needy,*
 and his prisoners he does not despise.
Let the heavens and the earth praise him,*
 the seas and all that moves in them;
For God will save Zion and rebuild the cities of Judah;*
 they shall live there and have it in possession.
The children of his servants will inherit it,*
 and those who love his name will dwell therein.

Psalm 70

Be pleased, O God, to deliver me;*
 O Lord, make haste to help me.
Let those who seek my life
   be ashamed and altogether dismayed;*
 let those who take pleasure in my misfortune
   draw back and be disgraced.
Let those who say to me 'Aha!'
   and gloat over me turn back,*
 because they are ashamed.
Let all who seek you rejoice and be glad in you;*
 let those who love your salvation say for ever,
   'Great is the Lord!'
But as for me, I am poor and needy;*
 come to me speedily, O God.
You are my helper and my deliverer;*
 O Lord, do not tarry.

FIRST READING [1 Sam. 22:6-end]:

Saul heard that David and those who were with him had been located. Saul was sitting at Gibeah, under the tamarisk tree on the height, with his spear in his hand, and all his servants were standing around him. Saul said to his servants who stood around him, 'Hear now, you Benjaminites; will the son of Jesse give every one of you fields and vineyards, will he make you all commanders of thousands and commanders of hundreds? Is that why all of you have conspired against me? No one discloses to me when my son makes a league with the son of Jesse, none of you is sorry for me or discloses to me that my son has stirred up my servant against me, to lie in wait, as he is doing today.' Doeg the Edomite, who was in charge of Saul's servants, answered, 'I saw the son of Jesse coming to Nob, to Ahimelech son of Ahitub; he inquired of the Lord for him, gave him provisions, and gave him the sword of Goliath the Philistine.' 

The king sent for the priest Ahimelech son of Ahitub and for all his father's house, the priests who were at Nob; and all of them came to the king. Saul said, 'Listen now, son of Ahitub.' He answered, 'Here I am, my lord.' Saul said to him, 'Why have you conspired against me, you and the son of Jesse, by giving him bread and a sword, and by inquiring of God for him, so that he has risen against me, to lie in wait, as he is doing today?' 

Then Ahimelech answered the king, 'Who among all your servants is so faithful as David? He is the king's son-in-law, and is quick to do your bidding, and is honoured in your house. Is today the first time that I have inquired of God for him? By no means! Do not let the king impute anything to his servant or to any member of my father's house; for your servant has known nothing of all this, much or little.' The king said, 'You shall surely die, Ahimelech, you and all your father's house.' The king said to the guard who stood around him, 'Turn and kill the priests of the Lord, because their hand also is with David; they knew that he fled, and did not disclose it to me.' But the servants of the king would not raise their hand to attack the priests of the Lord. Then the king said to Doeg, 'You, Doeg, turn and attack the priests.' Doeg the Edomite turned and attacked the priests; on that day he killed eighty-five who wore the linen ephod. Nob, the city of the priests, he put to the sword; men and women, children and infants, oxen, donkeys, and sheep, he put to the sword. 

But one of the sons of Ahimelech son of Ahitub, named Abiathar, escaped and fled after David. Abiathar told David that Saul had killed the priests of the Lord. David said to Abiathar, 'I knew on that day, when Doeg the Edomite was there, that he would surely tell Saul. I am responsible for the lives of all your father's house. Stay with me, and do not be afraid; for the one who seeks my life seeks your life; you will be safe with me.' 

HYMN 
Words: adapted from Jeremy Taylor, 1655
Music: Farley Castle  

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/r/r056.html
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Ride on triumphantly! Behold, we lay
our lusts and sins and proud will in thy way:
the road is ready, and thy paths made straight
with longing expectation seem to wait.

Hosanna! Welcome to our hearts! for here
thou hast a temple too, as Zion dear:
enter, O Lord, and cleanse that holy place
where thou dost choose to set thy beauteous face.

SECOND READING [Rom. 7:1-13]:

Do you not know, brothers and sisters—for I am speaking to those who know the law—that the law is binding on a person only during that person’s lifetime? Thus a married woman is bound by the law to her husband as long as he lives; but if her husband dies, she is discharged from the law concerning the husband. Accordingly, she will be called an adulteress if she lives with another man while her husband is alive. But if her husband dies, she is free from that law, and if she marries another man, she is not an adulteress. 

In the same way, my friends, you have died to the law through the body of Christ, so that you may belong to another, to him who has been raised from the dead in order that we may bear fruit for God. While we were living in the flesh, our sinful passions, aroused by the law, were at work in our members to bear fruit for death. But now we are discharged from the law, dead to that which held us captive, so that we are slaves not under the old written code but in the new life of the Spirit. 

What then should we say? That the law is sin? By no means! Yet, if it had not been for the law, I would not have known sin. I would not have known what it is to covet if the law had not said, 'You shall not covet.' But sin, seizing an opportunity in the commandment, produced in me all kinds of covetousness. Apart from the law sin lies dead. I was once alive apart from the law, but when the commandment came, sin revived and I died, and the very commandment that promised life proved to be death to me. For sin, seizing an opportunity in the commandment, deceived me and through it killed me. So the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and just and good. 

Did what is good, then, bring death to me? By no means! It was sin, working death in me through what is good, in order that sin might be shown to be sin, and through the commandment might become sinful beyond measure. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Lord of our lives,
we have decided to follow Jesus
and have chosen to be in your Kingdom.
Give us courage, discernment and an unwavering faith.

We pray for your Church throughout the world,
Shed forth your spirit of discipleship upon us.

When we are uncertain,
reveal a vision.

When we are passive,
light a fire.

When we are tempted,
send your Spirit.

Let no riches make me ever forget myself, 
no poverty ever make me to forget thee: 
let no hope or fear, no pleasure or pain, 
no accident without, no weakness within, 
hinder or discompose my duty, or turn me 
from the ways of thy commandments. 
O, let thy Spirit dwell with me for ever, 
and make my soul just and charitable, 
full of honesty, full of religion, 
resolute and constant in holy purposes, 
but inflexible to evil. 
Make me humble and obedient, peaceable and pious; 
let me never envy any man's goods, 
nor deserve to be despised myself: 
and if I be, teach me to bear it with meekness and charity. Amen.

Holy and loving God,
you dwell in the human heart
and make us partakers of the divine nature
in Christ our great high priest:
help us who remember your servant Jeremy Taylor
to put our trust in your heavenly promises
and follow a holy life in virtue and true godliness;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Calm our fears and strengthen our faith
that we may never doubt the presence of Jesus Christ our Lord,
but proclaim him as your Son, risen from the dead, living for ever and ever.
Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and closing sentence are adapted from prayers by Alan Griffiths..

he opening prayer and closing sentence are adapted from prayers by Alan Griffiths..

The first collect is by Jeremy Taylor.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Jeremy Taylor was born at Cambridge in 1613 and ordained in 1633. In the
years between 1633 and the ascendency of the Puritans in 1645, he was a
Fellow of two Cambridge colleges, and chaplain to Archbishop Laud and to
King Charles. Under Puritan rule, he was imprisoned three times, and forced
into retirement as a family chaplain in Wales. After the Restoration, in 1661, he
became Bishop of Down and Connor in Ireland. Among his many books on
theological, moral, and devotional subjects, the best known are The Rule and
Exercises of Holy Living (1650) and The Rule and Exercises of Holy Dying
(1651), usually cited simply as Holy Living and Holy Dying. Many readers,
including Charles Wesley a century later, have reported finding these books of
great spiritual benefit. Another work of his, Liberty of Prophesying, argues for
freedom of conscience and freedom of speech in a religious context. Being
stationed in an area that was largely Roman Catholic, he was, perhaps
inevitably, drawn into controversy, and he wrote a book called Dissuasion (or
Dissuasive) Against Popery. [James Kiefer]



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