OREMUS: 12 August 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Aug 11 17:22:25 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Thursday, August 12, 2010
John Henry Newman, Priest, Tractarian, 1890

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O Lord,
from the rising of the sun to its going down,
your Name is praised,
for you have raised us from the dust and set before us
the vision of your glory.
As you bestowed upon us the dignity of a royal priesthood,
you lift up our hearts to celebrate your praise.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 65

You are to be praised, O God, in Zion;*
 to you shall vows be performed in Jerusalem.
To you that hear prayer shall all flesh come,*
 because of their transgressions.
Our sins are stronger than we are,*
 but you will blot them out.
Happy are they whom you choose
   and draw to your courts to dwell there!*
 they will be satisfied by the beauty of your house,
   by the holiness of your temple.
Awesome things will you show us in your righteousness,
   O God of our salvation,*
 O Hope of all the ends of the earth
   and of the seas that are far away.
You make fast the mountains by your power;*
 they are girded about with might.
You still the roaring of the seas,*
 the roaring of their waves,
   and the clamour of the peoples.
Those who dwell at the ends of the earth
   will tremble at your marvellous signs;*
 you make the dawn and the dusk to sing for joy.
You visit the earth and water it abundantly;
   you make it very plenteous;*
 the river of God is full of water.
You prepare the grain,*
 for so you provide for the earth.
You drench the furrows and smooth out the ridges;*
 with heavy rain you soften the ground
   and bless its increase.
You crown the year with your goodness,*
 and your paths overflow with plenty.
May the fields of the wilderness be rich for grazing,*
 and the hills be clothed with joy.
May the meadows cover themselves with flocks
   and the valleys cloak themselves with grain;*
 let them shout for joy and sing.

Psalm 66

Be joyful in God, all you lands;*
 sing the glory of his name;
   sing the glory of his praise.
Say to God, 'How awesome are your deeds!*
 because of your great strength
   your enemies cringe before you.
'All the earth bows down before you,*
 sings to you, sings out your name.'
Come now and see the works of God,*
 how wonderful he is in his doing towards all people.
He turned the sea into dry land,
   so that they went through the water on foot,*
 and there we rejoiced in him.
In his might he rules for ever;
   his eyes keep watch over the nations;*
 let no rebel rise up against him.
Bless our God, you peoples;*
 make the voice of his praise to be heard;
Who holds our souls in life,*
 and will not allow our feet to slip.
For you, O God, have proved us;*
 you have tried us just as silver is tried.
You brought us into the snare;*
 you laid heavy burdens upon our backs.
You let enemies ride over our heads;
   we went through fire and water;*
 but you brought us out into a place of refreshment.
I will enter your house with burntofferings
   and will pay you my vows,*
 which I promised with my lips
   and spoke with my mouth when I was in trouble.
I will offer you sacrifices of fat beasts
   with the smoke of rams;*
 I will give you oxen and goats.
Come and listen, all you who fear God,*
 and I will tell you what he has done for me.
I called out to him with my mouth,*
 and his praise was on my tongue.
If I had found evil in my heart,*
 the Lord would not have heard me;
But in truth God has heard me;*
 he has attended to the voice of my prayer.
Blessed be God, who has not rejected my prayer,*
 nor withheld his love from me.

Psalm 67

May God be merciful to us and bless us,*
 show us the light of his countenance and come to us.
Let your ways be known upon earth,*
 your saving health among all nations.
Let the peoples praise you, O God;*
 let all the peoples praise you.
Let the nations be glad and sing for joy,*
 for you judge the peoples with equity
   and guide all the nations upon earth.
Let the peoples praise you, O God;*
 let all the peoples praise you.
The earth has brought forth her increase;*
 may God, our own God, give us his blessing.
May God give us his blessing,*
 and may all the ends of the earth stand in awe of him.

FIRST READING [1 Sam. 22:6-end]:

Saul heard that David and those who were with him had been located. Saul was sitting at Gibeah, under the tamarisk tree on the height, with his spear in his hand, and all his servants were standing around him. Saul said to his servants who stood around him, 'Hear now, you Benjaminites; will the son of Jesse give every one of you fields and vineyards, will he make you all commanders of thousands and commanders of hundreds? Is that why all of you have conspired against me? No one discloses to me when my son makes a league with the son of Jesse, none of you is sorry for me or discloses to me that my son has stirred up my servant against me, to lie in wait, as he is doing today.' Doeg the Edomite, who was in charge of Saul's servants, answered, 'I saw the son of Jesse coming to Nob, to Ahimelech son of Ahitub; he inquired of the Lord for him, gave him provisions, and gave him the sword of Goliath the Philistine.' 

The king sent for the priest Ahimelech son of Ahitub and for all his father's house, the priests who were at Nob; and all of them came to the king. Saul said, 'Listen now, son of Ahitub.' He answered, 'Here I am, my lord.' Saul said to him, 'Why have you conspired against me, you and the son of Jesse, by giving him bread and a sword, and by inquiring of God for him, so that he has risen against me, to lie in wait, as he is doing today?' 

Then Ahimelech answered the king, 'Who among all your servants is so faithful as David? He is the king's son-in-law, and is quick to do your bidding, and is honoured in your house. Is today the first time that I have inquired of God for him? By no means! Do not let the king impute anything to his servant or to any member of my father's house; for your servant has known nothing of all this, much or little.' The king said, 'You shall surely die, Ahimelech, you and all your father's house.' The king said to the guard who stood around him, 'Turn and kill the priests of the Lord, because their hand also is with David; they knew that he fled, and did not disclose it to me.' But the servants of the king would not raise their hand to attack the priests of the Lord. Then the king said to Doeg, 'You, Doeg, turn and attack the priests.' Doeg the Edomite turned and attacked the priests; on that day he killed eighty-five who wore the linen ephod. Nob, the city of the priests, he put to the sword; men and women, children and infants, oxen, donkeys, and sheep, he put to the sword. 

But one of the sons of Ahimelech son of Ahitub, named Abiathar, escaped and fled after David. Abiathar told David that Saul had killed the priests of the Lord. David said to Abiathar, 'I knew on that day, when Doeg the Edomite was there, that he would surely tell Saul. I am responsible for the lives of all your father's house. Stay with me, and do not be afraid; for the one who seeks my life seeks your life; you will be safe with me.' 

HYMN 
Words: John Henry Newman, 1833
Tune: Lux Benigna, Sandon, Alberta

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l014.html
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Lead, kindly Light, amid th'encircling gloom,
lead thou me on!
The night is dark, and I am far from home;
lead thou me on!
Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see
the distant scene; one step enough for me.

I was not ever thus, nor prayed that thou
shouldst lead me on;
I loved to choose and see my path; but now
lead thou me on!
I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears,
pride ruled my will: remember not past years!

So long thy power hath blessed me, sure it still
will lead me on.
O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent, till
the night is gone,
And with the morn those angel faces smile,
which I have loved long since, and lost awhile!

SECOND READING [Rom. 7:1-13]:

Do you not know, brothers and sisters—for I am speaking to those who know the law—that the law is binding on a person only during that person's lifetime? Thus a married woman is bound by the law to her husband as long as he lives; but if her husband dies, she is discharged from the law concerning the husband. Accordingly, she will be called an adulteress if she lives with another man while her husband is alive. But if her husband dies, she is free from that law, and if she marries another man, she is not an adulteress. 

In the same way, my friends, you have died to the law through the body of Christ, so that you may belong to another, to him who has been raised from the dead in order that we may bear fruit for God. While we were living in the flesh, our sinful passions, aroused by the law, were at work in our members to bear fruit for death. But now we are discharged from the law, dead to that which held us captive, so that we are slaves not under the old written code but in the new life of the Spirit. 

What then should we say? That the law is sin? By no means! Yet, if it had not been for the law, I would not have known sin. I would not have known what it is to covet if the law had not said, 'You shall not covet.' But sin, seizing an opportunity in the commandment, produced in me all kinds of covetousness. Apart from the law sin lies dead. I was once alive apart from the law, but when the commandment came, sin revived and I died, and the very commandment that promised life proved to be death to me. For sin, seizing an opportunity in the commandment, deceived me and through it killed me. So the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and just and good. 

Did what is good, then, bring death to me? By no means! It was sin, working death in me through what is good, in order that sin might be shown to be sin, and through the commandment might become sinful beyond measure. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Lord of our lives,
we have decided to follow Jesus
and have chosen to be in your Kingdom.
Give us courage, discernment and an unwavering faith.

We pray for your Church throughout the world,
Shed forth your spirit of discipleship upon us.

When we are uncertain,
reveal a vision.

When we are passive,
light a fire.

When we are tempted,
send your Spirit.

Enfold us in your love,
wrap us about with assurance
and infuse us with determination,
that we may be true disciples
and all the world may see the love of Jesus Christ in us. Amen.

I may never know it in this life
but I shall be told it in the next.
I am a link in a chain
a bond of connection between persons.
He has not created me for naught.
I shall do good - I shall do his work.
I shall be an angel of peace
a preacher of truth in my own place
while not intending it
if I do but keep his commandments.
he does nothing in vain.
He knows what he is about.
He may take away my friends.
He may throw me among strangers.
He may make me feel desolate
make my spirits sink
hide my future from me - still
he knows what he is about. Amen. 

God of power and might,
give us grace to follow the example 
of your servant John Henry Newman
to seek inward conversion 
and put aside external conformity for its own sake,
that we may serve God and do good without thinking about it,
without any calculation or reasoning,
from love of the good and hatred of evil,
dwelling in the full light of the Gospel
of your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Calm our fears and strengthen our faith
that we may never doubt the presence of Jesus Christ our Lord,
but proclaim him as your Son, risen from the dead, living for ever and ever.
Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and closing sentence are adapted from prayers by Alan Griffiths..

The first collect is by Cardinal Newman.

The second collect is by Stephen Benner, 2003, and is based on phrases from a
sermon by John Henry Newman.

John Henry Newman began his career as an Anglican churchman and scholar
and ended it as a Roman Catholic cardinal. He was born in London on
February 21, 1801, and at the age of fifteen, he enrolled in Trinity College,
beginning an association with Oxford University that would last for nearly
thirty years.
Newman moved from Trinity to Oriel College after receiving his bachelor's
degree in 1820, becoming a fellow in 1822 and a tutor in 1826. Two years
later, Edward Hawkins became the new provost of Oriel. Newman supported
Hawkins' candidacy, but it soon became clear that the two held different views
about the responsibilities of a college tutor: Newman believed that the
tutorship carried some pastoral duties, while Hawkins maintained that the
tutor/student relationship should be strictly academic. When Newman objected
to this view, Hawkins cut off his supply of new students, leaving him little
choice but to resign his post, which he did in 1832.
Newman's work in Oxford did not end with his resignation from the Oriel
tutorship. He had held academic and pastoral assignments simultaneously for
several years, serving first as both fellow of Oriel and curate of St. Clement's
and later as both tutor and vicar of St. Mary's. He remained in his pastoral
office until 1843, attracting hundreds of students, university officials, and
townspeople to St. Mary's with his scholarly yet earnest preaching.
The high point of Newman's Anglican career was his influential role in the
Oxford Movement, a High Church effort to return to the foundations of the
faith--the sacraments, episcopal governance, and apostolic succession--and to
affirm the Church's status as the via media, the middle ground between Roman
Catholicism's unfounded claims to authority and infallibility and the Dissenters'
equally unfounded emphasis upon spiritual liberty and private judgment. The
Movement began on July 14, 1833, when John Keble delivered a sermon
entitled "National Apostasy" from the pulpit of St. Mary's. Newman became
involved a few months later and was the Movement's primary spokesman,
promoting its doctrinal and moral concerns through his editorship of the British
Critic, his contributions to Tracts for the Times, and his weekly sermons at St.
Mary's.
In 1839, Newman began to lose confidence in the cause. The study of the
Monophysites he undertook that summer raised doubts about the validity of
the via media, and he soon became convinced that Rome, not Canterbury, was
the home of the true Church. He expressed his new views in Tract Ninety, in
which he argued that the Thirty-Nine Articles, the doctrinal statement of the
Church of England, could be interpreted in a way that supported Roman
Catholic doctrine. The Tract was published on February 27, 1841; its censure
by the Oxford authorities on March 15 was a severe blow to the Movement
and led to Newman's rapid withdrawal from Anglican life. Between July 1841
and September 1843, he left the British Critic, moved from Oxford to a
semi-monastic community at Littlemore, retracted the anti-Catholic statements
he had published, and resigned his position at St. Mary's.
Two years after leaving St. Mary's, Newman began a new life as a Roman
Catholic. He was officially received into the Church on October 9, 1845 and
was ordained to the priesthood the next year. His work with the Church
included establishing the Oratory of St. Philip Neri near Birmingham in 1848
and helping to create the Catholic University of Ireland, which he served as
rector from 1854 to 1858. He continued to write as well; some of the major
publications of his Catholic years were Parochial and Plain Sermons (1868), a
new edition of his Anglican discourses; The Idea of University (1852), a
collection of the inaugural lectures for the Catholic University and other
academic essays; An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent (1870), a treatise on
the philosophy of religion; and Apologia Pro Vita Sua (1864), his classic work
of spiritual autobiography.
The 1870s brought Newman special recognition for his work as both an
Anglican and a Roman Catholic. In 1877 he became the first person elected to
an honorary fellowship of Trinity College; two years later, Pope Leo XIII
awarded him a place in the College of Cardinals. He died on August 11, 1890,
and was buried in Warwickshire.



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