OREMUS: 19 April 2010

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Apr 18 19:24:35 GMT 2010


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OREMUS for Monday, April 19, 2010
Alphege, Archbishop of Canterbury, Martyr, 1012

Alleluia! Christ is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed! Alleluia!

Blessed are you, God of glory,
by the Spirit of the risen Christ
you gather us together;
for Christ is the one who walks with us,
who opens the scriptures
and breaks the bread of life.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/eastocan.html

Psalm 98

Sing to the Lord a new song,*
 for he has done marvellous things.
With his right hand and his holy arm*
 has he won for himself the victory.
The Lord has made known his victory;*
 his righteousness has he openly shown
   in the sight of the nations.
He remembers his mercy and faithfulness
   to the house of Israel,*
 and all the ends of the earth have seen
   the victory of our God.
Shout with joy to the Lord, all you lands;*
 lift up your voice, rejoice and sing.
Sing to the Lord with the harp,*
 with the harp and the voice of song.
With trumpets and the sound of the horn*
 shout with joy before the King, the Lord.
Let the sea make a noise and all that is in it,*
 the lands and those who dwell therein.
Let the rivers clap their hands,*
 and let the hills ring out with joy before the Lord,
   when he comes to judge the earth.
In righteousness shall he judge the world,*
 and the peoples with equity.

Psalm 99

The Lord is king; let the people tremble;*
 he is enthroned upon the cherubim; let the earth shake.
The Lord is great in Zion;*
 he is high above all peoples.
Let them confess his name, which is great and awesome;*
 he is the Holy One.
'O mighty King, lover of justice,
   you have established equity;*
 you have executed justice and righteousness in Jacob.'
Proclaim the greatness of the Lord our God
   and fall down before his footstool;*
 he is the Holy One.
Moses and Aaron among his priests,
   and Samuel among those who call upon his name,*
 they called upon the Lord and he answered them.
He spoke to them out of the pillar of cloud;*
 they kept his testimonies
   and the decree that he gave them.
'O Lord our God, you answered them indeed;*
 you were a God who forgave them,
   yet punished them for their evil deeds.'
Proclaim the greatness of the Lord our God
   and worship him upon his holy hill;*
 for the Lord our God is the Holy One.

Psalm 100

Be joyful in the Lord, all you lands;*
 serve the Lord with gladness
   and come before his presence with a song.
Know this: The Lord himself is God;*
 he himself has made us and we are his;
   we are his people and the sheep of his pasture.
Enter his gates with thanksgiving;
   go into his courts with praise;*
 give thanks to him and call upon his name.
For the Lord is good; his mercy is everlasting;*
 and his faithfulness endures from age to age.

Psalm 101

I will sing of mercy and justice;*
 to you, O Lord, will I sing praises.
I will strive to follow a blameless course;
   O when will you come to me?*
 I will walk with sincerity of heart within my house.
I will set no worthless thing before my eyes;*
 I hate the doers of evil deeds;
   they shall not remain with me.
A crooked heart shall be far from me;*
 I will not know evil.
My eyes are upon the faithful in the land,
   that they may dwell with me,*
 and only those who lead a blameless life
   shall be my servants.
Those who act deceitfully shall not dwell in my house,*
 and those who tell lies shall not continue in my sight.

FIRST READING [Exod. 17:8-end]:

Amalek came and fought with Israel at Rephidim. Moses said to Joshua, 'Choose some men for us and go out; fight with Amalek. Tomorrow I will stand on the top of the hill with the staff of God in my hand.' So Joshua did as Moses told him, and fought with Amalek, while Moses, Aaron, and Hur went up to the top of the hill. Whenever Moses held up his hand, Israel prevailed; and whenever he lowered his hand, Amalek prevailed. But Moses' hands grew weary; so they took a stone and put it under him, and he sat on it. Aaron and Hur held up his hands, one on one side, and the other on the other side; so his hands were steady until the sun set. And Joshua defeated Amalek and his people with the sword. 

Then the Lord said to Moses, 'Write this as a reminder in a book and recite it in the hearing of Joshua: I will utterly blot out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.' And Moses built an altar and called it, The Lord is my banner. He said, 'A hand upon the banner of the Lord! The Lord will have war with Amalek from generation to generation.' 

HYMN 
Words: Caroline Maria Noel (1817-1877)
Tune: Camberwell, Kings Weston, Evelyns, Gute Bäume bringen, Hermas

At the name of Jesus
every knee shall bow,
every tongue confess him
King of Glory now.
'Tis the Father's pleasure
we should call him Lord,
who from the beginning
was the mighty Word:

Mighty and mysterious
in the highest height,
God from everlasting
very light of light:
in the Father's bosom
with the Spirit blest,
love, in love eternal,
rest, in perfect rest.

At his voice creation
sprang at once to sight,
all the angel faces
all the hosts of light,
thrones and dominations,
stars upon their way,
all the heavenly orders
in their great array.

Humbled for a season,
to receive a name
from the lips of sinners
unto whom he came,
faithfully he bore it
spotless to the last,
brought it back victorious
when from death he passed.

Bore it up triumphant
with its human light,
through all ranks of creatures
to the central height,
to the throne of Godhead,
to the Father's breast;
filled it with the glory 
of that perfect rest.

Name him brothers name him,
with love as strong as death,
but with awe and wonder,
and with bated breath;
he is God the Saviour,
he is Christ the Lord,
ever to be worshipped,
trusted and adored.

In your hearts enthrone him;
there let him subdue
all that is not holy,
all that is not true:
crown him as your captain
in temptation's hour;
let his will enfold you
in its light and power.

Brothers, this Lord Jesus
shall return again,
with his Father's glory,
with his angel train;
for all wreaths of empire
meet upon his brow,
and our hearts confess him
King of Glory now.

SECOND READING [1 Pet. 3:13-end]:

Now who will harm you if you are eager to do what is good? 14But even if you do suffer for doing what is right, you are blessed. Do not fear what they fear,* and do not be intimidated, 15but in your hearts sanctify Christ as Lord. Always be ready to make your defence to anyone who demands from you an account of the hope that is in you; 16yet do it with gentleness and reverence.* Keep your conscience clear, so that, when you are maligned, those who abuse you for your good conduct in Christ may be put to shame. 17For it is better to suffer for doing good, if suffering should be God’s will, than to suffer for doing evil. 18For Christ also suffered* for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, in order to bring you* to God. He was put to death in the flesh, but made alive in the spirit, 19in which also he went and made a proclamation to the spirits in prison, 20who in former times did not obey, when God waited patiently in the days of Noah, during the building of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight people, were saved through water. 21And baptism, which this prefigured, now saves you—not as a removal of dirt from the body, but as an appeal to God for* a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 22who has gone into heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
O Sun of righteousness, 
you came forth from the dark night of death.  
May you rise also in our hearts,
and enable us to contemplate the glories 
of this sacred mystery, 
that we may praise and glorify you for ever.  
Lord of life, hear our prayer.

O Prince of Life, 
you take away the old leaven of malice and evil 
that we may always walk with you and serve you:
Abide continually with us, 
that in everything we do we may not forget the joy of your resurrection.
Lord of life, hear our prayer.

O Paschal Lamb, offered for all, 
you have taken away the sin of the world 
and by rising again you have restored to us everlasting life.
Send laborers into the harvest
to proclaim the life you offer to those who believe. 
We pray especially for 
Lord of life, hear our prayer.

O Conqueror of death and captain of our salvation, 
you overcame the darkness of death
and opened the kingdom of heaven for all believers.  
We thank you for those saints whom you have already led
through death to life in the glory of heaven.
Lord of life, hear our prayer.

O loving God, your martyr Alphege of Canterbury suffered violent death when
he refused to permit a ransom to be extorted from his people: Grant that all
pastors of your flock may pattern themselves on the Good Shepherd, who
laid down his life for the sheep; and who with you and the Holy Spirit lives
and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. 
		
Rejoicing in the God's new creation,
let us pray as our Redeemer has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Make our hearts burn to go back to the world
and speak your word of life in Jesus' Name. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses one sentence from _Revised
Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on
Common Texts and another sentence from _Opening Prayers: Collects in
Contemporary Language_.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

Alphege (Elphege, AElfheah) was born about 953, during the second major period of
Viking raids against England. He became first a monk and then a hermit, and then was
appointed Abbot of Bath. In 984 he became Bishop of Westminster. In 994 King Ethelred
the Unready sent him to parley with the Danish invaders Anlaf and Swein. The
Anglo-Saxons paid tribute, but Anlaf became a Christian and swore never to invade
England again. He never did. In that same year Alphege brought the newly baptized King
Olaf Tryggvason of Norway to a peaceful meeting with King Ethelred, and to his
confirmation at Andover. (Remark: "Unready" does not mean that the king was often
unprepared; it means that he was headstrong and stubborn, and would not accept "rede,"
meaning counsel or advice.)
In 1005 Alphege became Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1011 the Danes overran much of
southern England. The payment of the tribute agreed on (the Danegeld) did not stop them,
and in September they captured Canterbury and held Alphege and other prominent
persons for ransom. The others were duly paid for and released, but the price demanded
for Alphege was a fantastically high 3,000 pounds (worth of course, far more than modern
pounds). Alphege, knowing the poverty of his people, refused to pay or let anyone else
pay for him. The infuriated Danes, at the end of a drunken feast, brought him out and
repeated their demands. When he again refused, they threw various objects at him (large
bones from the feast, for example) and finally an axeman delivered the death-blow. Their
chief, Thorkell the Tall, tried to save him, offering all his possessions except his ship for
the Archbishop's life. By his death Alphege became a national hero.
When the Dane Cnut (Canute) became King of England in 1016, he adopted a policy of
conciliation, and in 1023 he brought the body of Alphege from London to Canterbury,
where he was long remembered as a martyr, one who died, not precisely for professing the
Christian faith, but for exercising the Christian virtue of justice. In art, he is shown with an
axe, the instrument of his death, or as a shepherd defending his flock from wolves. 



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