OREMUS: 17 October 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Oct 16 18:10:50 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Saturday, October 17, 2009
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch, Martyr, c.107

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Lord of the feast,
you have prepared a table before all peoples
and poured out life with such abundance
that death cannot claim the triumph over your universe.
You call us again to your banquet
where we may may receive your holy food,
and, strengthened by what is honorable, just, and pure,
be transformed into a people of righteousness and peace.
For these and all your mercies, 
we praise you: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 71

In you, O Lord, have I taken refuge;*
 let me never be ashamed.
In your righteousness, deliver me and set me free;*
 incline your ear to me and save me.
Be my strong rock, a castle to keep me safe;*
 you are my crag and my stronghold.
Deliver me, my God, from the hand of the wicked,*
 from the clutches of the evildoer and the oppressor.
For you are my hope, O Lord God,*
 my confidence since I was young.
I have been sustained by you ever since I was born;
   from my mother's womb you have been my strength;*
 my praise shall be always of you.
I have become a portent to many;*
 but you are my refuge and my strength.
Let my mouth be full of your praise*
 and your glory all the day long.
Do not cast me off in my old age;*
 forsake me not when my strength fails.
For my enemies are talking against me,*
 and those who lie in wait for my life
   take counsel together.
They say, 'God has forsaken him;
   go after him and seize him;*
 because there is none who will save.'
O God, be not far from me;*
 come quickly to help me, O my God.
Let those who set themselves against me
   be put to shame and be disgraced;*
 let those who seek to do me evil
   be covered with scorn and reproach.
But I shall always wait in patience,*
 and shall praise you more and more.
My mouth shall recount your mighty acts
   and saving deeds all day long;*
 though I cannot know the number of them.
I will begin with the mighty works of the Lord God;*
 I will recall your righteousness, yours alone.
O God, you have taught me since I was young,*
 and to this day I tell of your wonderful works.
And now that I am old and greyheaded, O God,
   do not forsake me,*

 till I make known your strength to this generation
   and your power to all who are to come.
Your righteousness, O God, reaches to the heavens;*
 you have done great things; who is like you, O God?
You have showed me great troubles and adversities,*
 but you will restore my life and bring me up again
   from the deep places of the earth.
You strengthen me more and more;*
 you enfold and comfort me,
Therefore I will praise you upon the lyre
   for your faithfulness, O my God;*
 I will sing to you with the harp, O Holy One of Israel.
My lips will sing with joy when I play to you,*
 and so will my soul, which you have redeemed.
My tongue will proclaim your righteousness all day long,*
 for they are ashamed and disgraced
   who sought to do me harm.

A Song of Jerusalem our Mother (Isaiah 66.10,11a,12a,12c,13a,14a,b)

Rejoice with Jerusalem and be glad for her,  
all you who love her,( says the Lord. 
Rejoice with her in joy,  
all you who mourn over her, 
That you may drink deeply with delight  
from her consoling breast.( 
For thus says our God,  
You shall be nursed and carried on her arm. 
As a mother comforts her children,  
so I will comfort you; 
You shall see and your heart shall rejoice;  
you shall flourish like the grass of the fields.( 

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram'shorn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loudclanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 25:2-6 & 26:6-14]:

Dominion and fear are with God;
   he makes peace in his high heaven. 
Is there any number to his armies?
   Upon whom does his light not arise? 
How then can a mortal be righteous before God?
   How can one born of woman be pure? 
If even the moon is not bright
   and the stars are not pure in his sight, 
how much less a mortal, who is a maggot,
   and a human being, who is a worm! 

Sheol is naked before God,
   and Abaddon has no covering. 
He stretches out Zaphon over the void,
   and hangs the earth upon nothing. 
He binds up the waters in his thick clouds,
   and the cloud is not torn open by them. 
He covers the face of the full moon,
   and spreads over it his cloud. 
He has described a circle on the face of the waters,
   at the boundary between light and darkness. 
The pillars of heaven tremble,
   and are astounded at his rebuke. 
By his power he stilled the Sea;
   by his understanding he struck down Rahab. 
By his wind the heavens were made fair;
   his hand pierced the fleeing serpent. 
These are indeed but the outskirts of his ways;
   and how small a whisper do we hear of him!
   But the thunder of his power who can understand? 

HYMN 
Words: Cecilia M Caddell (1813-1877) 
Tune: Flora

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/b/b069.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.             

Behold the lilies of the field,
they neither toil nor sow;
yet God does all things needful yield
that they may live and grow.

Not Solomon in glory shone
like one of these poor flowers,
that look to God and God alone
for sunshine and for showers.

And does his mercy value less
the offspring of his grace?
And will a Father's love not bless
the child that seeks his face?

He is our Father, and he knows
his earthly children's need:
on all our daily wants and woes
he looks with careful heed.

O then away with fear and care
for all that may betide;
and turn to God in trustful prayer,
and in his love confide. 

SECOND READING [James 4:1-12]:

Those conflicts and disputes among you, where do they come from? Do they not come from your cravings that are at war within you? You want something and do not have it; so you commit murder. And you covet something and cannot obtain it; so you engage in disputes and conflicts. You do not have, because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive, because you ask wrongly, in order to spend what you get on your pleasures. Adulterers! Do you not know that friendship with the world is enmity with God? Therefore whoever wishes to be a friend of the world becomes an enemy of God. Or do you suppose that it is for nothing that the scripture says, ‘God yearns jealously for the spirit that he has made to dwell in us’? But he gives all the more grace; therefore it says,
'God opposes the proud,
   but gives grace to the humble.' 

Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. Draw near to God, and he will draw near to you. Cleanse your hands, you sinners, and purify your hearts, you double-minded. Lament and mourn and weep. Let your laughter be turned into mourning and your joy into dejection. Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will exalt you. 

Do not speak evil against one another, brothers and sisters. Whoever speaks evil against another or judges another, speaks evil against the law and judges the law; but if you judge the law, you are not a doer of the law but a judge. There is one lawgiver and judge who is able to save and to destroy. So who, then, are you to judge your neighbour? 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Loving God, in Jesus Christ you teach us to pray:

Guide us by your Holy Spirit
that our prayers for others may serve your will
and show your steadfast love for all.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

Gracious God,
you have called together a people
to be the Church of Jesus Christ,
founded on the apostles.
May your people be one in faith and discipleship,
breaking bread together and telling good news.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

May the world come to believe that you are love,
turn to your ways and live in the light of your truth.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

You made all things and called them good.
May your planet earth be held in reverence by all people,
that its resources may be used wisely 
and its fragile balance between life and death respected.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

Hear our prayers for those who rule the nations,
that they may learn wisdom and truth,
establish justice and mercy
and seek the ways of peace.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

Faithful God, living Saviour,
in youth and old age,
in weakness and adversity,
from the womb to the grave,
may we know your protection
and proclaim your great salvation
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
		
Almighty God, 
whose servant Ignatius zealously proclaimed 
the true humanity of Christ 
and witnessed to him, both in life and in death: 
keep the Church firm in its faith 
and grant us all the grace of our Savior, Jesus Christ, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May we be mindful of God's call to holiness
and be clothed in the practice of good works,
that we may come to God's banquet prepared
to feast with the whole world.Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and the closing prayer are reprinted from _Revised Common
Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts.

After the Apostles, Ignatius was the second bishop of Antioch in Syria. His
predecessor, of whom little is known, was named Euodius. Whether he knew
any of the Apostles directly is uncertain. Little is known of his life except for
the very end of it. Early in the second century (perhaps around 107 AD, during
the reign of the Emperor Trajan), he was arrested by the Imperial authorities,
condemned to death, and transported to Rome to die in the arena. By thus
dealing with a leader, the rulers hoped to terrify the rank and file. Instead,
Ignatius took the opportunity to encourage them, speaking to groups of
Christians at every town along the way. When the prison escort reached the
west coast of Asia Minor, it halted before taking ship, and delegations from
several Asian churches were able to visit Ignatius, to speak with him at length,
to assist him with items for his journey, and to bid him an affectionate farewell
and commend him to the grace of God. In response he wrote seven letters that
have been preserved: five to congregations that had greeted him, en masse or
by delegates (Ephesians, Magnesians, Trallians, Philadelphians, and
Smyrnaeans), one to the congregation that would greet him at his destination
(Romans), and one to Polycarp, Bishop of Smyrna and disciple of the Apostle
John.
The themes with which he is chiefly concerned in his letters are (1) the
importance of maintaining Christian unity in love and sound doctrine (with
warnings against factionalism and against the heresy of Docetism -- the belief
that Christ was not fully human and did not have a material body or really
suffer and die), (2) the role of the clergy as a focus of Christian unity, (3)
Christian martyrdom as a glorious privilege, eagerly to be grasped.
He writes:
I am God's wheat, ground fine by the lion's teeth to be made purest bread for
Christ.
No early pleasures, no kingdoms of this world can benefit me in any way. I
prefer death in Christ Jesus to power over the farthest limits of the earth. He
who died in place of us is the one object of my quest. He who rose for our
sakes is my one desire. The time for my birth is close at hand. Forgive me, my
brothers. Do not stand in the way of my birth to real life; do not wish me
stillborn. My desire is to belong to God. Do not, then, hand me back to the
world. do not try to tempt me with material things. Let me attain pure light.
Only on my arrival there can I be fully a human being. Give me the privilege of
imitating the passion of my God.



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