OREMUS: 14 October 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Oct 13 17:00:01 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Wednesday, October 14, 2009
Teresa of Avila, Teacher of the Faith, 1582

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Lord of the feast,
you have prepared a table before all peoples
and poured out life with such abundance
that death cannot claim the triumph over your universe.
You call us again to your banquet
where we may may receive your holy food,
and, strengthened by what is honorable, just, and pure,
be transformed into a people of righteousness and peace.
For these and all your mercies, 
we praise you: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 44

We have heard with our ears, O God,
   our forebears have told us,*
 the deeds you did in their days,
   in the days of old.
How with your hand you drove the peoples out
   and planted our forebears in the land;*
 how you destroyed nations and made your people flourish.
For they did not take the land by their sword,
   nor did their arm win the victory for them;*
 but your right hand, your arm,
   and the light of your countenance,
   because you favoured them.
You are my King and my God;*
 you command victories for Jacob.
Through you we pushed back our adversaries;*
 through your name we trampled on those
   who rose up against us.
For I do not rely on my bow,*
 and my sword does not give me the victory.
Surely, you gave us victory over our adversaries*
 and put those who hate us to shame.
Every day we gloried in God,*
 and we will praise your name for ever.
Nevertheless, you have rejected and humbled us*
 and do not go forth with our armies.
You have made us fall back before our adversary,*
 and our enemies have plundered us.
You have made us like sheep to be eaten*
 and have scattered us among the nations.
You are selling your people for a trifle*
 and are making no profit on the sale of them.
You have made us the scorn of our neighbours,*
 a mockery and derision to those around us.
You have made us a byword among the nations,*
 a laughingstock among the peoples.
My humiliation is daily before me,*
 and shame has covered my face;
Because of the taunts of the mockers and blasphemers,*
 because of the enemy and avenger.
All this has come upon us;*
 yet we have not forgotten you,
   nor have we betrayed your covenant.
Our heart never turned back,*
 nor did our footsteps stray from your path;
Though you thrust us down into a place of misery,*
 and covered us over with deep darkness.
If we have forgotten the name of our God,*
 or stretched out our hands to some strange god,
Will not God find it out?*
 for he knows the secrets of the heart.
Indeed, for your sake we are killed all the day long;*
 we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.
Awake, O Lord! why are you sleeping?*
 Arise! do not reject us for ever.
Why have you hidden your face*
 and forgotten our affliction and oppression?
We sink down into the dust;*
 our body cleaves to the ground.
Rise up and help us,*
 and save us for the sake of your steadfast love.

A Song of the New Jerusalem (Isaiah 60.13,11a,18,19,14b)

Arise, shine out, for your light has come,  
the glory of the Lord is rising upon you. 
Though night still covers the earth,  
and darkness the peoples; 
Above you the Holy One arises,  
and above you God(s glory appears. 
The nations will come to your light,  
and kings to your dawning brightness. 
Your gates will lie open continually,  
shut neither by day nor by night. 
The sound of violence shall be heard no longer in your land,  
or ruin and devastation within your borders. 
You will call your walls, Salvation,  
and your gates, Praise. 
No more will the sun give you daylight,  
nor moonlight shine upon you; 
But the Lord will be your everlasting light,  
your God will be your splendour. 
For you shall be called the city of God,  
the dwelling of the Holy One of Israel.

Psalm 147:13-end

Alleluia!
Worship the Lord, O Jerusalem;*
 praise your God, O Zion;
For he has strengthened the bars of your gates;*
 he has blessed your children within you.
He has established peace on your borders;*
 he satisfies you with the finest wheat.
He sends out his command to the earth,*
 and his word runs very swiftly.
He gives snow like wool;*
 he scatters hoarfrost like ashes.
He scatters his hail like bread crumbs;*
 who can stand against his cold?
He sends forth his word and melts them;*
 he blows with his wind and the waters flow.
He declares his word to Jacob,*
 his statutes and his judgements to Israel.
He has not done so to any other nation;*
 to them he has not revealed his judgements.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 18:5-7, 14-21]:

'Surely the light of the wicked is put out,
   and the flame of their fire does not shine. 
The light is dark in their tent,
   and the lamp above them is put out. 
Their strong steps are shortened,
   and their own schemes throw them down. 
They are torn from the tent in which they trusted,
   and are brought to the king of terrors. 
In their tents nothing remains;
   sulphur is scattered upon their habitations. 
Their roots dry up beneath,
   and their branches wither above. 
Their memory perishes from the earth,
   and they have no name in the street. 
They are thrust from light into darkness,
   and driven out of the world. 
They have no offspring or descendant among their people,
   and no survivor where they used to live. 
They of the west are appalled at their fate,
   and horror seizes those of the east. 
Surely such are the dwellings of the ungodly,
   such is the place of those who do not know God.'

HYMN 
Words: Teresa of Avila (1545-1582); translation by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Tune: Taize

Nada te turbe, nada te espante.
Quien a Dios tiene nada le falta.
Nada te turbe, nada te espante.
Solo Dios basta.

Let nothing disturb thee,
Nothing affright thee;
All things are passing,
God never changeth!
Patient endurance attaineth to all things;
Who God possesseth in nothing is wanting;
Alone God sufficeth.

SECOND READING [James 2:1-13]:

My brothers and sisters, do you with your acts of favouritism really believe in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ? For if a person with gold rings and in fine clothes comes into your assembly, and if a poor person in dirty clothes also comes in, and if you take notice of the one wearing the fine clothes and say, ‘Have a seat here, please’, while to the one who is poor you say, ‘Stand there’, or, ‘Sit at my feet’, have you not made distinctions among yourselves, and become judges with evil thoughts? Listen, my beloved brothers and sisters. Has not God chosen the poor in the world to be rich in faith and to be heirs of the kingdom that he has promised to those who love him? But you have dishonoured the poor. Is it not the rich who oppress you? Is it not they who drag you into court? Is it not they who blaspheme the excellent name that was invoked over you? 

You do well if you really fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, ‘You shall love your neighbour as yourself.’ But if you show partiality, you commit sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors. For whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become accountable for all of it. For the one who said, ‘You shall not commit adultery’, also said, ‘You shall not murder.’ Now if you do not commit adultery but if you murder, you have become a transgressor of the law. So speak and so act as those who are to be judged by the law of liberty. For judgement will be without mercy to anyone who has shown no mercy; mercy triumphs over judgement. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray for the grace to recognize
the presence of God in our lives.

Open our eyes to see your salvation;
reveal yourself to a blind humanity.

Make your face shine upon those who live with disease;
give them your strength and your peace.

Let all who are weighed down by want come to know your bounty;
that they may put their trust in your goodness.

To those who hold power and riches, grant a discerning spirit;
that they may be set free by your freedom and love.

In the darkness of unknowing,
when your love seems absent
and your favour far away,
draw near to us, O God,
through Jesus Christ,
the forsaken one,
the risen one,
our Redeemer and our Lord. Amen.
		
Merciful God,
who by your Spirit raised up your servant Teresa of Avila
to reveal to your Church the way of perfection:
grant that her teaching
may awaken in us a longing for holiness,
until we attain to the perfect union of love
in Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May we be mindful of God's call to holiness
and be clothed in the practice of good works,
that we may come to God's banquet prepared
to feast with the whole world.Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and the closing prayer are reprinted from _Revised Common
Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada (later known as Teresa de Jesus) was born in
Avila, Spain, 28 March 1515, one of ten children whose mother died when she
was fifteen. Her family was of partly Jewish ancestry. Teresa, having read the
letters of Jerome, decided to become a nun, and when she was 20, she entered
the Carmelite convent in Avila. There she fell seriously ill, was in a coma for a
while, and partially paralyzed for three years. In her early years as a nun, she
was, by her account, assiduous in prayer while sick but lax and lukewarm in
her prayers and devotions when the sickness had passed. However, her prayer
life eventually deepened, she began to have visions and a vivid sense of the
presence of God, and was converted to a life of extreme devotion.
In 1560 she resolved to reform the monastery that had, she thought, departed
from the order's original intention and become insufficiently austere. Her
proposed reforms included strict enclosure (the nuns were not to go to parties
and social gatherings in town, or to have social visitors at the convent, but to
stay in the convent and pray and study most of their waking hours) and
discalcing (literally, taking off one's shoes, a symbol of poverty, humility, and
the simple life, uncluttered by luxuries and other distractions). In 1562 she
opened a new monastery in Avila, over much opposition in the town and from
the older monastery. At length Teresa was given permission to proceed with
her reforms, and she travelled throughout Spain establishing seventeen houses
of Carmelites of the Strict (or Reformed) Observance (the others are called
Carmelites of the Ancient Observance). The reformed houses were small, poor,
disciplined, and strictly enclosed. Teresa died 4 October 1582.
Teresa is reported to have been very attractive in person, witty, candid, and
affectionate. She is remembered both for her practical achievements and
organizing skill and for her life of contemplative prayer. Her books are read as
aids to the spiritual life by many Christians of all denominations. Her Life is her
autobiography to 1562; The Way of Perfection is a treatise on the Christian
walk, written primarily for her sisters but of help to others as well; The Book
of Foundations deals with establishing, organizing and overseeing the daily
functioning of religious communities; The Interior Castle (or The Castle of The
Soul) deals with the life of Christ in the heart of the believer. Most of these are
available in paperback. 31 of her poems and 458 of her letters survive.
Christ has no body now but yours
No hands, no feet on earth but yours
Yours are the eyes through which He looks
compassion on this world
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.



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