OREMUS: 10 October 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Oct 9 20:18:14 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Saturday, October 10, 2009
Paulinus, Bishop of York, Missionary, 644

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed is your glorious name,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
worthy of praise from every mouth,
of confession from every tongue,
of worship from every creature.
You created the world in your grace,
and by your compassion you redeemed it.
Heaven and earth are full of your praises:
Glory be to you, O God most high!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 145

I will exalt you, O God my King,*
 and bless your name for ever and ever.
Every day will I bless you*
 and praise your name for ever and ever.
Great is the Lord and greatly to be praised;*
 there is no end to his greatness.
One generation shall praise your works to another*
 and shall declare your power.
I will ponder the glorious splendour of your majesty*
 and all your marvellous works.
They shall speak of the might of your wondrous acts,*
 and I will tell of your greatness.
They shall publish the remembrance
   of your great goodness;*
 they shall sing of your righteous deeds.
The Lord is gracious and full of compassion,*
 slow to anger and of great kindness.
The Lord is loving to everyone*
 and his compassion is over all his works.
All your works praise you, O Lord,*
 and your faithful servants bless you.
They make known the glory of your kingdom*
 and speak of your power;
That the peoples may know of your power*
 and the glorious splendour of your kingdom.
Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom;*
 your dominion endures throughout all ages.
The Lord is faithful in all his words*
 and merciful in all his deeds.
The Lord upholds all those who fall;*
 he lifts up those who are bowed down.
The eyes of all wait upon you, O Lord,*
 and you give them their food in due season.
You open wide your hand*
 and satisfy the needs of every living creature.
The Lord is righteous in all his ways*
 and loving in all his works.
The Lord is near to those who call upon him,*
 to all who call upon him faithfully.
He fulfils the desire of those who fear him,*
 he hears their cry and helps them.
The Lord preserves all those who love him,*
 but he destroys all the wicked.
My mouth shall speak the praise of the Lord;*
 let all flesh bless his holy name for ever and ever.

A Song of the Righteous (Wisdom 3.1,2a,3b8)

The souls of the righteous are in the hand of God  
and no torment will ever touch them. 
In the eyes of the foolish, they seem to have died;  
but they are at peace. 
For though, in the sight of others, they were punished,  
their hope is full of immortality. 
Having been disciplined a little, 
they will receive great good,  
because God tested them and found them worthy. 
Like gold in the furnace, God tried them  
and, like a sacrificial burnt offering, accepted them. 
In the time of their visitation, they will shine forth  
and will run like sparks through the stubble. 
They will govern nations and rule over peoples  
and God will reign over them for ever.

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram'shorn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loudclanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 12:1-10]:

Then Job answered: 
'2No doubt you are the people,
   and wisdom will die with you. 
3But I have understanding as well as you;
   I am not inferior to you.
   Who does not know such things as these? 
4I am a laughing-stock to my friends;
   I, who called upon God and he answered me,
   a just and blameless man, I am a laughing-stock. 
5Those at ease have contempt for misfortune,*
   but it is ready for those whose feet are unstable. 
6The tents of robbers are at peace,
   and those who provoke God are secure,
   who bring their god in their hands.* 

7'But ask the animals, and they will teach you;
   the birds of the air, and they will tell you; 
8ask the plants of the earth,* and they will teach you;
   and the fish of the sea will declare to you. 
9Who among all these does not know
   that the hand of the Lord has done this? 
10In his hand is the life of every living thing
   and the breath of every human being.' 

HYMN 
Words: Christian L Scheidt (1709-1761)
Tune: Justin, O Waly Waly, Neumark

By grace I'm saved, grace free and boundless;
My soul, believe and doubt it not.
Why stagger at this word of promise?
Hath scripture ever falsehood taught?
No! then this word must true remain:
By grace thou, too, shalt heaven obtain.

By grace! None dare lay claim to merit;
Our works and conduct have no worth.
God in His love sent our Redeemer,
Christ Jesus, to this sinful earth;
His death did for our sins atone
And we are saved by grace alone.

By grace! O, mark this word of promise
When thou art by thy sins oppressed,
When Satan plagues thy troubled conscience
And when thy heart is seeking rest.
What reason cannot comprehend
God by His grace to thee doth send.

By grace! This ground of faith is certain;
So long as God is true, it stands.
What saints have penned by inspiration,
What in His word our God commands,
What our whole faith must rest upon,
Is grace alone, grace in His Son.

SECOND READING [James 1:1-11]:

James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ,

To the twelve tribes in the Dispersion:

Greetings. 

My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance; and let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking in nothing. 

If any of you is lacking in wisdom, ask God, who gives to all generously and ungrudgingly, and it will be given you. But ask in faith, never doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, driven and tossed by the wind; for the doubter, being double-minded and unstable in every way, must not expect to receive anything from the Lord. 

Let the believer who is lowly boast in being raised up, and the rich in being brought low, because the rich will disappear like a flower in the field. For the sun rises with its scorching heat and withers the field; its flower falls, and its beauty perishes. It is the same with the rich; in the midst of a busy life, they will wither away. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
In every time of trouble,
you, O God, are a very present help.
You are with us, sustaining our world in freedom,
restraining the powers of darkness, of death and of destruction;
embracing us all with arms of love, to enfold and to hold.
And so we bring to you our prayers for ourselves,
for those we love, and for our world.

We pray for ourselves and our own needs:
Whatever you would have us to be;
whatever we need to love our neighbor as ourselves,
whatever we need to love one another:

Bountiful Source of Love:
hear our prayer.

We pray for those we love:
Our hopes and dreams for them;
our anguish and anxiety on their behalf;
our desire to make life easier for them.
Bountiful Source of Love:
hear our prayer.

We pray for our world:
Our pain at what we have done to creation;
our wonder at the beauty of that which we have not yet spoiled;
our calling to establish justice and peace.
Bountiful Source of Love:
hear our prayer.

Lord God, King of the Universe,
you show the bright glory of your reign
in acts of mercy and enduring love:
raise the spirits of the downcast
and restore those who have fallen away,
that your Church may continually sing of your saving help;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
		
God our Saviour,
who sent Paulinus to preach and to baptize,
and so to build up your Church:
grant that, inspired by his example,
we may tell all the world of your truth,
that with him we may receive the reward
you prepare for all your faithful servants;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the God of peace
make us holy through and through,
and keep us sound in spirit, soul, and body,
free of any fault
when our Lord Jesus Christ comes. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and the closing prayer are adapted from Common Order,
(c) 1994 The Church of Scotland.

In the middle 400's the pagan Anglo-Saxons invaded Britain, driving the Christian Britons north and west into Cornwall, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. In 597 a band of monks headed by Augustine of Canterbury (feast 26 May--not to be confused with Augustine of Hippo) arrived in southeastern England, in the kingdom of Kent, and began to evangelize the people there, with considerable success. In 601 a second group of monks arrived, including Paulinus (born around 584). Sometime after 616, Edwin, the pagan king of Northumbria (the region north of the Humber river--roughly the northern quarter of England), asked for the hand in marriage of Ethelburga, the sister of the king of Kent. He was told that a Christian princess could not marry a pagan, but he promised that she would be free to practice her religion, and that he would listen to Christian preachers, and seriously consider becoming a Christian himself. At this Ethelburga agreed to marry him, and went north in 625, taking with her as chaplain the monk Paulinus, who was consecrated bishop for the purpose. Edwin heard the preaching of Paulinus for many months, and finally consulted his advisors. Coifi, the high priest of the pagan religion, advised adopting Christianity, since he said that the pagan religion had not proved satisfactory. Another nobleman agreed, saying: "Life is like a banquet hall. Inside is light and fire and warmth and feasting, but outside it is cold and dark. A sparrow flies in through a window at one end, flies the length of the hall, and out through a window at the other end. That is what life is like. At birth we emerge from the unknown, and for a brief while we are here on this earth, with a fair amount of comfort and happiness. But then we fly out the window at the other end, into the cold and dark and unknown future. If the new religion can lighten that darkness for us, then let us follow it." The other elders and
counselors of the king gave similar advice, and so in 627 the king and many of his chief men were baptized. Other conversions followed, and the Church in Northumbria
flourished. However, six years later, King Edwin was defeated and killed by Cadwallon of Wales and Penda of Mercia at the battle of Hatfield Chase. Paulinus left his deacon James in charge of what remained of the Church there, and took Queen Ethelburga and her children back to Kent by ship. There the elderly Paulinus was given the bishopric of Rochester, which he held till his death on 10 October 644. [James Kiefer]



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