OREMUS: 9 October 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Oct 8 17:00:00 GMT 2009


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org for more resources, a link to our store in association with Amazon and other opportunities to support this ministry. This ministry can only continue with your support.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Friday, October 9, 2009
Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, Philosopher, Scientist, 1253

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed is your glorious name,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
worthy of praise from every mouth,
of confession from every tongue,
of worship from every creature.
You created the world in your grace,
and by your compassion you redeemed it.
Heaven and earth are full of your praises:
Glory be to you, O God most high!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
<!
http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html
>
Psalm 22

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?*
 and are so far from my cry
   and from the words of my distress?
O my God, I cry in the daytime,
   but you do not answer;*
 by night as well, but I find no rest.
Yet you are the Holy One,*
 enthroned upon the praises of Israel.
Our forebears put their trust in you;*
 they trusted and you delivered them.
They cried out to you and were delivered;*
 they trusted in you and were not put to shame.
But as for me, I am a worm and no man,*
 scorned by all and despised by the people.
All who see me laugh me to scorn;*
 they curl their lips and wag their heads, saying,
'He trusted in the Lord; let him deliver him;*
 let him rescue him, if he delights in him.'
Yet you are he who took me out of the womb,*
 and kept me safe upon my mother's breast.
I have been entrusted to you ever since I was born;*
 you were my God
   when I was still in my mother's womb.
Be not far from me, for trouble is near,*
 and there is none to help.
Many young bulls encircle me;*
 strong bulls of Bashan surround me.
They open wide their jaws at me,*
 like a ravening and a roaring lion.
I am poured out like water;
   all my bones are out of joint;*
 my heart within my breast is melting wax.
My mouth is dried out like a potsherd;
   my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth;*
 and you have laid me in the dust of the grave.
Packs of dogs close me in,
   and gangs of evildoers circle around me;*
 they pierce my hands and my feet;
   I can count all my bones.
They stare and gloat over me;*
 they divide my garments among them;
   they cast lots for my clothing.

Be not far away, O Lord;*
 you are my strength; hasten to help me.
Save me from the sword,*
 my life from the power of the dog.
Save me from the lion's mouth,*
 my wretched body from the horns of wild bulls.
I will declare your name to my people;*
 in the midst of the congregation I will praise you.
Praise the Lord, you that fear him;*
 stand in awe of him, O offspring of Israel;
   all you of Jacob's line, give glory.
For he does not despise nor abhor
   the poor in their poverty;
   neither does he hide his face from them;*
 but when they cry to him he hears them.
My praise is of him in the great assembly;*
 I will perform my vows
   in the presence of those who worship him.
The poor shall eat and be satisfied,
   and those who seek the Lord shall praise him:*
 'May your heart live for ever!'
All the ends of the earth
   shall remember and turn to the Lord,*
 and all the families of the nations
   shall bow before him.
For kingship belongs to the Lord;*
 he rules over the nations.
To him alone all who sleep in the earth
   bow down in worship;*
 all who go down to the dust fall before him.
My soul shall live for him;
   my descendants shall serve him;*
 they shall be known as the Lord's for ever.
They shall come and make known to a people yet unborn*
 the saving deeds that he has done.

A Song of Repentance (1 John 1. 59)

This is the message we have heard from Christ 
and proclaim to you:  
that God is light, 
in whom there is no darkness at all. 
If we say that we have fellowship with God 
while we walk in darkness,  
we lie and do not do what is true. 
But if we walk in the light 
as God is in the light,  
we have fellowship with one another. 
And the blood of Jesus, the Son of God,  
cleanses us from all our sins. 
If we say that we have no sin,  
we deceive ourselves 
and the truth is not in us. 
If we confess our sins,  
the One who is faithful and just will forgive us 
and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a twoedged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 11:7-end]:

‘Can you find out the deep things of God?
   Can you find out the limit of the Almighty? 
It is higher than heaven—what can you do?
   Deeper than Sheol—what can you know? 
Its measure is longer than the earth,
   and broader than the sea. 
If he passes through, and imprisons,
   and assembles for judgement, who can hinder him? 
For he knows those who are worthless;
   when he sees iniquity, will he not consider it? 
But a stupid person will get understanding,
   when a wild ass is born human. 

‘If you direct your heart rightly,
   you will stretch out your hands towards him. 
If iniquity is in your hand, put it far away,
   and do not let wickedness reside in your tents. 
Surely then you will lift up your face without blemish;
   you will be secure, and will not fear. 
You will forget your misery;
   you will remember it as waters that have passed away. 
And your life will be brighter than the noonday;
   its darkness will be like the morning. 
And you will have confidence, because there is hope;
   you will be protected and take your rest in safety. 
You will lie down, and no one will make you afraid;
   many will entreat your favour. 
But the eyes of the wicked will fail;
   all way of escape will be lost to them,
   and their hope is to breathe their last.’ 

HYMN 
Words: Edward Hayes Plumptre (1821-1891)
Tune: Neumark, O Waly Waly

O Lord of hosts, all heaven possessing,
Behold us from thy sapphire throne:
In doubt and darkness dimly guessing,
We might thy glory half have known;
But thou in Christ hast made us thine,
And on us all thy beauties shine.

Illumine all, disciples, teachers,
Thy law's deep wonders to unfold;
With reverent hand let wisdom's preachers
Bring forth their treasures, new and old;
Let oldest, youngest, find in thee
Of truth and love the boundless sea.

Let faith still light the lamp of science,
And knowledge pass from truth to truth,
And wisdom, in its full reliance,
Renew the primal awe of youth:
So holier, wiser, may we grow,
As time's swift currents onward flow.

Bind thou our life in fullest union
With all thy saints from sin set free;
Uphold us in that blest communion
Of all thy saints on earth with thee;
Keep thou our souls, or there, or here,
In mightiest love, that casts out fear.

SECOND READING [2 Thessalonians 3:6-end]:

Now we command you, beloved,* in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, to keep away from believers who are* living in idleness and not according to the tradition that they* received from us. 7For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, 8and we did not eat anyone’s bread without paying for it; but with toil and labour we worked night and day, so that we might not burden any of you. 9This was not because we do not have that right, but in order to give you an example to imitate. 10For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: Anyone unwilling to work should not eat. 11For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work. 12Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work quietly and to earn their own living. 13Brothers and sisters,* do not be weary in doing what is right. 

14 Take note of those who do not obey what we say in this letter; have nothing to do with them, so that they may be ashamed. 15Do not regard them as enemies, but warn them as believers.* 

Final Greetings and Benediction
16 Now may the Lord of peace himself give you peace at all times in all ways. The Lord be with all of you. 

<<P<17I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand. This is the mark in every letter of mine; it is the way I write. 18The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with all of you.
 
The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray to God for the coming of the Kingdom:

O God, into the pain of the tortured:
breathe stillness.

Into the hunger of those deprived:
breathe fullness.

Into those who have died in you:
breathe life.

Into those who long for you:
breathe your presence.

Into your Church, especially the Diocese of
shed forth your renewing Spirit.

Your kingdom come, your will be done:
For the kingdom, the power and the glory
are yours, now and for ever. Amen.

Merciful God,
your Son came to free us from sin,
overcoming death and rising in triumph:
may we, who are redeemed by his blood
be made ready to meet you face to face;
this we ask for Jesus( sake. Amen.
		
O God, 
who raised up your faithful servant Robert Grosseteste 
to be a bishop and pastor in your Church and to feed your flock; 
Give abundantly to all pastors the gifts of your Holy Spirit, 
that they may minister in your household as true servants of Christ 
and stewards of your divine mysteries;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the God of peace
make us holy through and through,
and keep us sound in spirit, soul, and body,
free of any fault
when our Lord Jesus Christ comes. Amen.
*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and the closing prayer are adapted from Common Order,
(c) 1994 The Church of Scotland.

The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

Had the leaders of the thirteenth century heeded this preacher, many of the
disasters of the following three centuries might have been avoided. Robert was
a peasant lad from Suffolk, born about 1175. He distinguished himself at
Oxford in law, medicine, languages, natural sciences, and theology. He became
what is now called Chancellor of Oxford University.
In 1235, he was elected Bishop of Lincoln, in area the largest diocese in
England. He promptly visited all the churches in the diocese and quickly
removed many of the prominent clergy because they were neglectng their
pastoral duties. He vigorously opposed the practice by which the Pope
appointed Italians as absentee clergy for English churches (collecting salaries
from said churches without ever setting foot in the country). He insisted that
his priests spend their time in the service of their people, in prayer, and in
study. He went on a pilgrimage to Rome, where he spoke out boldly against
ecclesiastical abuses. Back in England, he spoke against unlawful usurpations
of power by the monarch, and was one of those present at the signing of the
Magna Carta.
Grosseteste's scholarly writings embraced many fields of learning. He
translated into Latin the Ethics of Aristotle and the theological works of John
of Damascus and of the fifth-century writer known as Dionysius the
Areopagite. He was skilled in poetry, music, architecture, mathematics,
astronomy, optics, and physics (one of his pupils was Roger Bacon). His
writings on the first chapter of Genesis include an interesting anticipation of
modern cosmological ideas. (He read that the first thing created was light, and
said that the universe began with pure energy exploding from a point source.)
He knew Hebrew and Greek, and his Biblical studies were a notable
contribution to the scholarship of the day. [James Kiefer]



More information about the oremus mailing list