OREMUS: 6 October 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Oct 5 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Tuesday, October 6, 2009
William Tyndale, Translator of the Scriptures, Martyr, 1536

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed is your glorious name,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
worthy of praise from every mouth,
of confession from every tongue,
of worship from every creature.
You created the world in your grace,
and by your compassion you redeemed it.
Heaven and earth are full of your praises:
Glory be to you, O God most high!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 11

In the Lord have I taken refuge;*
 how then can you say to me,
   'Fly away like a bird to the hilltop;
'For see how the wicked bend the bow
   and fit their arrows to the string,*
 to shoot from ambush at the true of heart.
'When the foundations are being destroyed,*
 what can the righteous do?'
The Lord is in his holy temple;*
 the Lord's throne is in heaven.
His eyes behold the inhabited world;*
 his piercing eye weighs our worth.
The Lord weighs the righteous as well as the wicked,*
 but those who delight in violence he abhors.
Upon the wicked he shall rain coals of fire
   and burning sulphur;*
 a scorching wind shall be their lot.
For the Lord is righteous;
   he delights in righteous deeds;*
 and the just shall see his face.

Psalm 12

Help me, Lord, for there is no godly one left;*
 the faithful have vanished from among us.
Everyone speaks falsely with their neighbour;*
 with a smooth tongue they speak from a double heart.
O that the Lord would cut off all smooth tongues,*
 and close the lips that utter proud boasts!
Those who say, 'With our tongue will we prevail;*
 our lips are our own; who is lord over us?'
'Because the needy are oppressed,
   and the poor cry out in misery,*
 I will rise up', says the Lord,
   'and give them the help they long for.'
The words of the Lord are pure words,*
 like silver refined from ore
   and purified seven times in the fire.
O Lord, watch over us*
 and save us from this generation for ever.
The wicked prowl on every side,*
 and that which is worthless is highly prized by everyone.

Great and Wonderful (Revelation 15.3,4)

Great and wonderful are your deeds, . 
Lord God the Almighty. 
Just and true are your ways, . 
O ruler of the nations. 
Who shall not revere and praise your name, O Lord? . 
for you alone are holy. 
All nations shall come and worship in your presence: . 
for your just dealings have been revealed.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;

But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 4:12-end]:

‘Now a word came stealing to me,
   my ear received the whisper of it. 
Amid thoughts from visions of the night,
   when deep sleep falls on mortals, 
dread came upon me, and trembling,
   which made all my bones shake. 
A spirit glided past my face;
   the hair of my flesh bristled. 
It stood still,
   but I could not discern its appearance.
A form was before my eyes;
   there was silence, then I heard a voice: 
“Can mortals be righteous before God?
   Can human beings be pure before their Maker? 
Even in his servants he puts no trust,
   and his angels he charges with error; 
how much more those who live in houses of clay,
   whose foundation is in the dust,
   who are crushed like a moth. 
Between morning and evening they are destroyed;
   they perish for ever without any regarding it. 
Their tent-cord is plucked up within them,
   and they die devoid of wisdom.”

HYMN 
Words: Fred Kaan (1929-2009)
Meter: 86 86 D

For all who have enriched our lives,
whom we have loved and known,
for saints alive among us still
by whom our faith is honed,
we thank you, God, who came and comes
through women, children, men,
to share the highs and lows of life:
God-for-us, now as then.

For all who with disarming love
have led us to explore
the risk of reasoning and doubt,
new realms not known before,
we thank you, God, who came and comes
to free us from our past,
from ghettos of a rigid mind,
from truths unfit to last.

For all whose laughter has unnerved
tradition gone awry,
who with incisive gentleness
pursue each human 'why?',
we thank you, God, who came and comes
to those who probe and ask,
who seek to know the mind of Christ
and take the church to task.

Now for each other and ourselves
we pray that, healed of fear,
we may re-live the love of Christ,
prepared in hope to err.
Then leave us, God, who comes and goes,
in human-ness to grow,
to care for people, tend the earth,
- the only earth we know!

SECOND READING [2 Thessalonians 1]:

Paul, Silvanus, and Timothy,

To the church of the Thessalonians in God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ: 

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. 

We must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters, as is right, because your faith is growing abundantly, and the love of every one of you for one another is increasing. Therefore we ourselves boast of you among the churches of God for your steadfastness and faith during all your persecutions and the afflictions that you are enduring. 

This is evidence of the righteous judgement of God, and is intended to make you worthy of the kingdom of God, for which you are also suffering. For it is indeed just of God to repay with affliction those who afflict you, and to give relief to the afflicted as well as to us, when the Lord Jesus is revealed from heaven with his mighty angels in flaming fire, inflicting vengeance on those who do not know God and on those who do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus. These will suffer the punishment of eternal destruction, separated from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might, when he comes to be glorified by his saints and to be marvelled at on that day among all who have believed, because our testimony to you was believed. To this end we always pray for you, asking that our God will make you worthy of his call and will fulfil by his power every good resolve and work of faith, so that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you, and you in him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Lord Jesus,
born in pain, struggling towards life, fighting for breath;
born in shame, 
born to the threat of Herod(s sword; 
fleeing to another country, another home;
wrapped in a young girl(s love, placed in a borrowed bed;
We pray for those we know and love;
for all who suffer pain of body or anguish of mind;
for all who struggle to live, to live well, to live better;
for all who burn with shame,
for all who face threat and danger,
We pray to you, O God:
Hear our prayer.

We pray for warravaged countries and refugees;
for the starving poor;
for battered wives and abused children;
for the homeless, for the mentally ill;
for those who struggle with disability.
Strengthen us to work for peace on the earth 
and peace with the earth.
We pray to you, O God:
Hear our prayer.

We pray for the Church,
especially the Diocese of
Keep us faithful that we may bear faithful witness in word and work
to your presence among us.
We pray to you, O God:
Hear our prayer.

We pray for all who are alone.
May our love reach out to the lonely and brokenhearted,
the bereaved, and all for whom life has become something to be endured.
May we open our minds, hearts and homes to those around us.
We pray to you, O God:
Hear our prayer.

And we pray for our own needs:
seeking the grace of your presence,
firming our resolve to behave as we believe;
seeking your courage to reconcile, heal and make new;
seeking a sure vision of your coming kingdom.
We pray to you, O God:
Hear our prayer.

Father, help your people 
in this world to build 
something of your kingdom, 
and to do your will. 
Strengthen, Lord, for service, 
hand and heart and brain; 
Let the living presence 
of the servant-Christ 
heighten our devotion, 
and make our life a feast. Amen.

Lord, give to your people grace to hear and keep your word
that, after the example of your servant William Tyndale,
we may not only profess your gospel
but also be ready to suffer and die for it,
to the honour of your name;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the God of peace
make us holy through and through,
and keep us sound in spirit, soul, and body,
free of any fault
when our Lord Jesus Christ comes. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and the closing prayer are adapted from Common Order,
(c) 1994 The Church of Scotland.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

William Tyndale was born about 1495 at Slymbridge near the Welsh border.
He received his degrees from Magdalen College, Oxford, and also studied at
Cambridge. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1521, and soon began to
speak of his desire, which eventually became his life's obsession, to translate
the Scriptures into English. It is reported that, in the course of a dispute with a
promminent clergyman who disparaged this proposal, he said, "If God spare
my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plow to know more
of the Scriptures than thou dost." The remainder of his life was devoted to
keeping that vow, or boast. Finding that the King, Henry VIII, was firmly set
against any English version of the Scriptures, he fled to Germany (visiting
Martin Luther in 1525), and there travelled from city to city, in exile, poverty,
persecution, and constant danger. Tyndale understood the commonly received
doctrine -- the popular theology -- of his time to imply that men earn their
salvation by good behavior and by penance. He wrote eloquently in favor of
the view that salvation is a gift of God, freely bestowed, and not a response to
any good act on the part of the receiver. His views are expressed in numerous
pamphlets, and in the introductions to and commentaries on various books of
the Bible that accompanied his translations. He completed his translation of the
New Testament in 1525, and it was printed at Worms and smuggled into
England. Of 18,000 copies, only two survive. In 1534, he produced a revised
version, and began work on the Old Testament. In the next two years he
completed and published the Pentateuch and Jonah, and translated the books
from Joshua through Second Chronicles, but then he was captured (betrayed
by one he had befriended), tried for heresy, and put to death. He was burned at
the stake, but, as was often done, the officer strangled him before lighting the
fire. His last words were, "Lord, open the King of England's eyes."
Miles Coverdale continued Tyndale's work by translating those portions of the
Bible (including the Apocrypha) which Tyndale had not lived to translate
himself, and publishing the complete work. In 1537, the "Matthew Bible"
(essentially the Tyndale-Coverdale Bible under another man's name to spare
the government embarrassment) was published in England with the Royal
Permission. Six copies were set up for public reading in Old St. Paul's Church,
and throughout the daylight hours the church was crowded with those who had
come to hear it. One man would stand at the lectern and read until his voice
gave out, and then he would stand down and another would take his place. All
English translations of the Bible from that time to the present century are
essentially revisions of the Tyndale-Coverdale work. [James Kiefer,
abridged]



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