OREMUS: 16 November 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Nov 15 20:07:31 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Monday, November 16, 2009
Margaret, Queen of Scotland, Philanthropist, Reformer of the Church, 1093

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God of all gods.
that you gave your beloved Son
in covenant for us.
He lived as we must live;
he died as we must die.
You raised him from death's dark domain,
and set us free to live for ever.
He speaks for us before your throne,
and brings us grace to help in time of need.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 79

O God, the heathen have come into your inheritance;
   they have profaned your holy temple;*
 they have made Jerusalem a heap of rubble.
They have given the bodies of your servants
   as food for the birds of the air,*
 and the flesh of your faithful ones
   to the beasts of the field.
They have shed their blood like water
   on every side of Jerusalem,*
 and there was no one to bury them.
We have become a reproach to our neighbours,*
 an object of scorn and derision to those around us.
How long will you be angry, O Lord?*
 will your fury blaze like fire for ever?
Pour out your wrath upon the heathen
   who have not known you*
 and upon the kingdoms
   that have not called upon your name.
For they have devoured Jacob*
 and made his dwelling a ruin.
Remember not our past sins;
   let your compassion be swift to meet us;*
 for we have been brought very low.
Help us, O God our Saviour, for the glory of your name;*
 deliver us and forgive us our sins, for your name's sake.     [
Why should the heathen say, 'Where is their God?'*
 Let it be known among the heathen and in our sight
   that you avenge the shedding
   of your servants' blood.]
Let the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners
   come before you,*
 and by your great might
   spare those who are condemned to die.     [
May the revilings with which
   they reviled you, O Lord,*
 return sevenfold into their bosoms.]
We are your people and the sheep of your pasture;*
 we will give you thanks for ever
   and show forth your praise from age to age.

Psalm 80

Hear, O Shepherd of Israel, leading Joseph like a flock;*
 shine forth, you that are enthroned upon the cherubim.
In the presence of Ephraim, Benjamin and Manasseh,*
 stir up your strength and come to help us.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
O Lord God of hosts,*
 how long will you be angered
   despite the prayers of your people?
You have fed them with the bread of tears;*
 you have given them bowls of tears to drink.
You have made us the derision of our neighbours,*
 and our enemies laugh us to scorn.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
You have brought a vine out of Egypt;*
 you cast out the nations and planted it.
You prepared the ground for it;*
 it took root and filled the land.
The mountains were covered by its shadow*
 and the towering cedar trees by its boughs.
You stretched out its tendrils to the Sea*
 and its branches to the River.
Why have you broken down its wall,*
 so that all who pass by pluck off its grapes?
The wild boar of the forest has ravaged it,*
 and the beasts of the field have grazed upon it.
Turn now, O God of hosts, look down from heaven;
   behold and tend this vine;*
 preserve what your right hand has planted.
They burn it with fire like rubbish;*
 at the rebuke of your countenance let them perish.
Let your hand be upon the man of your right hand,*
 the son of man you have made so strong for yourself.
And so will we never turn away from you;*
 give us life, that we may call upon your name.
Restore us, O Lord God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.

Psalm 81

Sing with joy to God our strength*
 and raise a loud shout to the God of Jacob.
Raise a song and sound the timbrel,*
 the merry harp and the lyre.
Blow the ram'shorn at the new moon,*
 and at the full moon, the day of our feast.
For this is a statute for Israel,*
 a law of the God of Jacob.
He laid it as a solemn charge upon Joseph,*
 when he came out of the land of Egypt.
I heard an unfamiliar voice saying,*
 'I eased his shoulder from the burden;
   his hands were set free from bearing the load.'
You called on me in trouble and I saved you;*
 I answered you from the secret place of thunder
   and tested you at the waters of Meribah.
Hear, O my people, and I will admonish you:*
 O Israel, if you would but listen to me!
There shall be no strange god among you;*
 you shall not worship a foreign god.
I am the Lord your God,
   who brought you out of the land of Egypt and said,*
 'Open your mouth wide and I will fill it.'
And yet my people did not hear my voice,*
 and Israel would not obey me.
So I gave them over to the stubbornness
   of their hearts,*
 to follow their own devices.
O that my people would listen to me!*
 that Israel would walk in my ways!
I should soon subdue their enemies*
 and turn my hand against their foes.
Those who hate the Lord would cringe before him,*
 and their punishment would last for ever.
But Israel would I feed with the finest wheat*
 and satisfy him with honey from the rock.

FIRST READING [Wisdom 1:1-7]:

Love righteousness, you rulers of the earth,
think of the Lord in goodness
and seek him with sincerity of heart; 
because he is found by those who do not put him to the test,
and manifests himself to those who do not distrust him. 
For perverse thoughts separate people from God,
and when his power is tested, it exposes the foolish; 
because wisdom will not enter a deceitful soul,
or dwell in a body enslaved to sin. 
For a holy and disciplined spirit will flee from deceit,
and will leave foolish thoughts behind,
and will be ashamed at the approach of unrighteousness. 

For wisdom is a kindly spirit,
but will not free blasphemers from the guilt of their words;
because God is witness of their inmost feelings,
and a true observer of their hearts, and a hearer of their tongues. 
Because the spirit of the Lord has filled the world,
and that which holds all things together knows what is said, 

HYMN 
Words: Anonymous
Tune: Orientis partibusw

Dare to think, though others frown;
Dare in words your thoughts express;
Dare to rise, though oft cast down;
Dare the wronged and scorned to bless.

Dare from custom to depart;
Dare the priceless pearl possess;
Dare to wear it in your heart;
Dare, when others curse, to bless.

Dare what conscience says is right;
Do what reason says is best;
Do with all your mind and might;
Do your duty and be blest.

SECOND READING [1 Peter 3:13-end]:

Now who will harm you if you are eager to do what is good? But even if you do suffer for doing what is right, you are blessed. Do not fear what they fear, and do not be intimidated, but in your hearts sanctify Christ as Lord. Always be ready to make your defence to anyone who demands from you an account of the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and reverence. Keep your conscience clear, so that, when you are maligned, those who abuse you for your good conduct in Christ may be put to shame. For it is better to suffer for doing good, if suffering should be God’s will, than to suffer for doing evil. For Christ also suffered for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, in order to bring you to God. He was put to death in the flesh, but made alive in the spirit, in which also he went and made a proclamation to the spirits in prison, who in former times did not obey, when God waited patiently in the days of Noah, during the building of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight people, were saved through water. And baptism, which this prefigured, now saves you—not as a removal of dirt from the body, but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has gone into heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Almighty God,
maker of all good things and Father of all;
you have shown us in Christ the purpose of your creation
and call us to be responsible in the world.

We pray for the world
all the nations....
our own country....
those in authority....
the peace of the world....
racial harmony....
those who maintain order....

Almighty God, we give you thanks
for the order of created things

the resources of the earth
and the gift of human life....

for the continuing work of creation,
man's share in it,
and for creative vision and inventive skill....

for your faithfulness to man in patience and in love,
and for every human response of obedience
and humble achievement....

May we delight in your purpose
and work to bring all things to their true end;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to you, Lord Jesus Christ, our Good Shepherd:
you have led us to the kingdom of your Father(s love. 
Forgive our careless indifference 
to your loving care for all your creatures, 
and remake us in the likeness of your new and risen life. 
We ask this in your Name. Amen.
		
O God, the ruler of all,
who called your servant Margaret to an earthly throne
and gave her zeal for your Church and love for your people
that she might advance your heavenly kingdom:
mercifully grant that we who commemorate her example
may be fruitful in good works
and attain to the glorious crown of your saints;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Send your Holy Spirit upon your Church
that in all our words and works
we may serve you better and love you more. Amen.
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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and closing prayer are adapted from material found in Book of
Common Order, 1994, The Church of Scotland. The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Margaret (born c. 1045) was the grand-daughter of Edmund Ironside, King of
the English, but was probably born in exile in Hungary, and brought to England
in 1057. After the Norman Conquest in 1066, she sought refuge in Scotland,
where about 1070 she married the King, Malcolm III. She and her husband
rebuilt the monastery of Iona and founded the Benedictine Abbey at
Dunfermline. Margaret undertook to impose on the Scottish the ecclesiastical
customs she had been accustomed to in England, customs that were also
prevalent in France and Italy. But Margaret was not concerned only with
ceremonial considerations. She encouraged the founding of schools, hospitals,
and orphanages. She argued in favor of the practice of receiving the Holy
Communion frequently. She was less successful in preventing feuding among
Highland Clans, and when her husband was treacherously killed in 1093, she
herself died a few days later (of grief, it is said). [James Kiefer]



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