OREMUS: 8 May 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu May 7 17:00:00 GMT 2009


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org for more resources, a link to our store in association with Amazon and other opportunities to support this ministry. This ministry can only continue with your support.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Friday, May 8, 2009
Julian of Norwich, Spiritual Writer, c.1417

Alleluia! Christ is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed! Alleluia!

Blessed are you, God of peace, 
who brought back from the dead our Lord Jesus, 
the great shepherd of the sheep, 
by the blood of the eternal covenant, 
making us complete in everything good 
so that we may do his will, 
and working among us that which is pleasing in his sight.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/eastocan.html

Psalm 94

O Lord God of vengeance,*
 O God of vengeance, show yourself.
Rise up, O Judge of the world;*
 give the arrogant their just deserts.
How long shall the wicked, O Lord,*
 how long shall the wicked triumph?
They bluster in their insolence;*
 all evildoers are full of boasting.
They crush your people, O Lord,*
 and afflict your chosen nation.
They murder the widow and the stranger*
 and put the orphans to death.
Yet they say, 'The Lord does not see,*
 the God of Jacob takes no notice.'
Consider well, you dullards among the people;*
 when will you fools understand?
He that planted the ear, does he not hear?*
 he that formed the eye, does he not see?
He who admonishes the nations, will he not punish?*
 he who teaches all the world, has he no knowledge?
The Lord knows our human thoughts;*
 how like a puff of wind they are.
Happy are they whom you instruct, O Lord!*
 whom you teach out of your law;
To give them rest in evil days,*
 until a pit is dug for the wicked.
For the Lord will not abandon his people,*
 nor will he forsake his own.
For judgement will again be just,*
 and all the true of heart will follow it.
Who rose up for me against the wicked?*
 who took my part against the evildoers?
If the Lord had not come to my help,*
 I should soon have dwelt in the land of silence.
As often as I said, 'My foot has slipped',*
 your love, O Lord, upheld me.
When many cares fill my mind,*
 your consolations cheer my soul.
Can a corrupt tribunal have any part with you,*
 one which frames evil into law?
They conspire against the life of the just*
 and condemn the innocent to death.

But the Lord has become my stronghold,*
 and my God the rock of my trust.
He will turn their wickedness back upon them
   and destroy them in their own malice;*
 the Lord our God will destroy them.

A Song of Julian of Norwich

God chose to be our mother in all things
and so made the foundation of his work,
most humbly and most pure,
in the Virgin's womb.

God, the perfect wisdom of all,
arrayed himself in this humble place.

Christ came in our poor flesh
to share a mother's care.

Our mothers bear us for pain and for death;
our true mother, Jesus,
bears us for joy and endless life.

Christ carried us within him in love and travail,
until the full time of his passion.

And when all was completed
and he had carried us so for joy,
still all this could not satisfy
the power of his wonderful love.

All that we owe is redeemed in truly loving God,
for the love of Christ works in us;
Christ is the one whom we love.

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a twoedged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Exodus 33:7-end]:

Now Moses used to take the tent and pitch it outside the camp, far off from the camp; he called it the tent of meeting. And everyone who sought the Lord would go out to the tent of meeting, which was outside the camp. Whenever Moses went out to the tent, all the people would rise and stand, each of them, at the entrance of their tents and watch Moses until he had gone into the tent. When Moses entered the tent, the pillar of cloud would descend and stand at the entrance of the tent, and the Lord would speak with Moses. When all the people saw the pillar of cloud standing at the entrance of the tent, all the people would rise and bow down, all of them, at the entrance of their tents. Thus the Lord used to speak to Moses face to face, as one speaks to a friend. Then he would return to the camp; but his young assistant, Joshua son of Nun, would not leave the tent. 

Moses said to the Lord, 'See, you have said to me, “Bring up this people”; but you have not let me know whom you will send with me. Yet you have said, “I know you by name, and you have also found favour in my sight.” Now if I have found favour in your sight, show me your ways, so that I may know you and find favour in your sight. Consider too that this nation is your people.' He said, 'My presence will go with you, and I will give you rest.' And he said to him, 'If your presence will not go, do not carry us up from here. For how shall it be known that I have found favour in your sight, I and your people, unless you go with us? In this way, we shall be distinct, I and your people, from every people on the face of the earth.' 

The Lord said to Moses, 'I will do the very thing that you have asked; for you have found favour in my sight, and I know you by name.' Moses said, 'Show me your glory, I pray.' And he said, 'I will make all my goodness pass before you, and will proclaim before you the name, “The Lord”; and I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy. But', he said, 'you cannot see my face; for no one shall see me and live.' And the Lord continued, 'See, there is a place by me where you shall stand on the rock; and while my glory passes by I will put you in a cleft of the rock, and I will cover you with my hand until I have passed by; then I will take away my hand, and you shall see my back; but my face shall not be seen.' 
 
HYMN 
Words: Alan Gaunt (born 1935) © 1991 Stainer & Bell Ltd Used with permission.
Meter: 10 10 10 10

Eternal God, supreme in tenderness,
Enfolding all creation in your grace;
Your mercy wraps us round, and ever shall,
And in your purpose, all things shall be well.

Eternal Son, as one of us you came
To be despised, made nothing, put to shame;
And now a mother comforting, you call,
'All shall be well, and all things shall be well.'

Eternal Spirit, source of all delight,
You stream in glory through the soul's dark night;
We taste your spring of joy, for ever full,
And know within that all things shall be well.

Eternal Trinity, through grief and pain,
Through all the malice by which love is slain,
Through all earth's anguish and the throes of hell,
We trust to see, in you, all things made well.

SECOND READING [Hebrews 11:1-16]:

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Indeed, by faith our ancestors received approval. By faith we understand that the worlds were prepared by the word of God, so that what is seen was made from things that are not visible. 

By faith Abel offered to God a more acceptable sacrifice than Cain's. Through this he received approval as righteous, God himself giving approval to his gifts; he died, but through his faith he still speaks. By faith Enoch was taken so that he did not experience death; and 'he was not found, because God had taken him.' For it was attested before he was taken away that 'he had pleased God.' And without faith it is impossible to please God, for whoever would approach him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who seek him. By faith Noah, warned by God about events as yet unseen, respected the warning and built an ark to save his household; by this he condemned the world and became an heir to the righteousness that is in accordance with faith. 

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to set out for a place that he was to receive as an inheritance; and he set out, not knowing where he was going. By faith he stayed for a time in the land he had been promised, as in a foreign land, living in tents, as did Isaac and Jacob, who were heirs with him of the same promise. For he looked forward to the city that has foundations, whose architect and builder is God. By faith he received power of procreation, even though he was too old—and Sarah herself was barren—because he considered him faithful who had promised. Therefore from one person, and this one as good as dead, descendants were born, 'as many as the stars of heaven and as the innumerable grains of sand by the seashore.' 

All of these died in faith without having received the promises, but from a distance they saw and greeted them. They confessed that they were strangers and foreigners on the earth, for people who speak in this way make it clear that they are seeking a homeland. If they had been thinking of the land that they had left behind, they would have had opportunity to return. But as it is, they desire a better country, that is, a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God; indeed, he has prepared a city for them. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
In joy and hope we pray.

That our risen Savior may fill us with the joy
of his glorious and life-giving resurrection:
Lord, hear our prayer.

That isolated and persecuted churches
may find fresh strength in the good news of Easter:
Lord, hear our prayer.

That God may grant us humility
to be subject to one another in Christian love:
Lord, hear our prayer.

That God may help us to provide for those
who lack food, work or shelter:
Lord, hear our prayer.

That by God(s power we may bring
wars and famine to cease through all the world:
Lord, hear our prayer.

That God may strengthen us to be his presence
to the sick, the weak and the dying:
Lord, hear our prayer.

That God may send upon us the fire of the Holy Spirit,
that we may be faithful witness to his resurrection:
Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord our God, judge of all,
before whom no secrets are hidden:
let your justice shine forth
and your righteousness sweep wickedness from its throne,
that we may live for your glory;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
		
Rejoicing in the God's new creation,
let us pray as our Redeemer has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Lead us always to the living waters
where you promise respite and refreshment,
that we may be counted among those
who know and follow you, O Lord. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The Lady Juliana was born about 1342, and when she was thirty years old, she became gravely ill and was expected to die. Then, on the seventh day, the medical crisis passed, and she had a series of fifteen visions, or "showings," in which she was led to contemplate the Passion of Christ. These brought her great peace and joy. She became an anchoress, living in a small hut near to the church in Norwich, where she  devoted the rest of her life to prayer and contemplation of the meaning of her visions. The results of her meditations she wrote in a book called Revelations of Divine Love. During her lifetime, she became known as a counselor, whose advice combined spiritual insight with common sense, and many persons came to speak with her. Since her death, many more have found help in her writings. The precise date of her death is uncertain.
Her book is a tender meditation on God's eternal and all-embracing love, as expressed to us in the Passion of Christ. She describes seeing God holding a tiny thing in his hand, like a small brown nut, which seemed so fragile and insignificant that she wondered why it did not crumble before her eyes. She understood that the thing was the entire created universe, which is as nothing compared to its Creator, and she was told, "God made it, God loves it, God keeps it."
She was concerned that sometimes when we are faced wiith a difficult moral decision, it seems that no matter which way we decide, we will have acted from motives that are less then completely pure, so that neither decision is defensible. She finally wrote: "It is enough to be sure of the deed. Our courteous Lord will deign to redeem the motive." [James Kiefer, abridged]



More information about the oremus mailing list