OREMUS: 26 March 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Mar 25 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Thursday, March 26, 2009
Harriet Monsell, Founder of the Community of St John the Baptist, Clewer, 1883

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Glory to you, O Champion of all Loves,
who for our sake endured the cross,
encountered the enemy and tasted death.
Glory be to you, O King of all kings,
who for our salvation
wrestled with principalities and powers,
subdued the forces of hell
and won the greatest of all victories.
To you be all praise, all glory and all love;
now and for ever. Amen.

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html
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Psalm 104

Bless the Lord, O my soul;*
 O Lord my God, how excellent is your greatness!
   you are clothed with majesty and splendour.
You wrap yourself with light as with a cloak*
 and spread out the heavens like a curtain.
You lay the beams of your chambers
   in the waters above;*
 you make the clouds your chariot;
   you ride on the wings of the wind.
You make the winds your messengers*
 and flames of fire your servants.
You have set the earth upon its foundations,*
 so that it never shall move at any time.
You covered it with the deep as with a mantle;*
 the waters stood higher than the mountains.
At your rebuke they fled;*
 at the voice of your thunder they hastened away.
They went up into the hills
   and down to the valleys beneath,*
 to the places you had appointed for them.
You set the limits that they should not pass;*
 they shall not again cover the earth.
You send the springs into the valleys;*
 they flow between the mountains.
All the beasts of the field drink their fill from them,*
 and the wild asses quench their thirst.
Beside them the birds of the air make their nests*
 and sing among the branches.
You water the mountains from your dwelling on high;*
 the earth is fully satisfied by the fruit of your works.
You make grass grow for flocks and herds*
 and plants to serve us all;
That they may bring forth food from the earth,*
 and wine to gladden our hearts,
Oil to make a cheerful countenance,*
 and bread to strengthen the heart.
The trees of the Lord are full of sap,*
 the cedars of Lebanon which he planted,
In which the birds build their nests,*
 and in whose tops the stork makes his dwelling.
The high hills are a refuge for the mountain goats,*
 and the stony cliffs for the rock badgers.
You appointed the moon to mark the seasons,*
 and the sun knows the time of its setting.
You make darkness that it may be night,*
 in which all the beasts of the forest prowl.
The lions roar after their prey*
 and seek their food from God.
The sun rises and they slip away*
 and lay themselves down in their dens.
The labourer goes forth to work*
 and to toil until the evening.
O Lord, how manifold are your works!*
 in wisdom you have made them all;
   the earth is full of your creatures.
Yonder is the great and wide sea
   with its living things too many to number,*
 creatures both small and great.
There move the ships,
   and there is that Leviathan,*
 which you have made for the sport of it.
All of them look to you*
 to give them their food in due season.
You give it to them, they gather it;*
 you open your hand and they are filled with good things.
You hide your face and they are terrified;*
 you take away their breath
   and they die and return to their dust.
You send forth your Spirit and they are created;*
 and so you renew the face of the earth.
May the glory of the Lord endure for ever;*
 may the Lord rejoice in all his works.
He looks at the earth and it trembles;*
 he touches the mountains and they smoke.
I will sing to the Lord as long as I live;*
 I will praise my God while I have my being.
May these words of mine please him;*
 I will rejoice in the Lord.
Let sinners be consumed out of the earth,*
 and the wicked be no more.
Bless the Lord, O my soul.
>
A Song of Repentance (1 John 1. 59)

	
This is the message we have heard from Christ 
and proclaim to you:  
that God is light, 
in whom there is no darkness at all. 
If we say that we have fellowship with God 
while we walk in darkness,  
we lie and do not do what is true. 
But if we walk in the light 
as God is in the light,  
we have fellowship with one another. 
And the blood of Jesus, the Son of God,  
cleanses us from all our sins. 
If we say that we have no sin,  
we deceive ourselves 
and the truth is not in us. 
If we confess our sins,  
the One who is faithful and just will forgive us 
and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Psalm 148

Praise the Lord from the heavens;*
 praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you angels of his;*
 praise him, all his host.
Praise him, sun and moon;*
 praise him, all you shining stars.
Praise him, heaven of heavens,*
 and you waters above the heavens.
Let them praise the name of the Lord;*
 for he commanded and they were created.
He made them stand fast for ever and ever;*
 he gave them a law which shall not pass away.
Praise the Lord from the earth,*
 you seamonsters and all deeps;
Fire and hail, snow and fog,*
 tempestuous wind, doing his will;
Mountains and all hills,*
 fruit trees and all cedars;
Wild beasts and all cattle,*
 creeping things and winged birds;
Kings of the earth and all peoples,*

 princes and all rulers of the world;
Young men and maidens,*
 old and young together.
Let them praise the name of the Lord,*
 for his name only is exalted,
   his splendour is over earth and heaven.
He has raised up strength for his people
   and praise for all his loyal servants,*
 the children of Israel, a people who are near him.

FIRST READING [Genesis 49:33-50:26]:

When Jacob ended his charge to his sons, he drew up his feet into the bed, breathed his last, and was gathered to his people. 

Then Joseph threw himself on his father's face and wept over him and kissed him. Joseph commanded the physicians in his service to embalm his father. So the physicians embalmed Israel; they spent forty days in doing this, for that is the time required for embalming. And the Egyptians wept for him for seventy days. 

When the days of weeping for him were past, Joseph addressed the household of Pharaoh, 'If now I have found favour with you, please speak to Pharaoh as follows: My father made me swear an oath; he said, “I am about to die. In the tomb that I hewed out for myself in the land of Canaan, there you shall bury me.” Now therefore let me go up, so that I may bury my father; then I will return.' Pharaoh answered, 'Go up, and bury your father, as he made you swear to do.' 

So Joseph went up to bury his father. With him went up all the servants of Pharaoh, the elders of his household, and all the elders of the land of Egypt, as well as all the household of Joseph, his brothers, and his father's household. Only their children, their flocks, and their herds were left in the land of Goshen. Both chariots and charioteers went up with him. It was a very great company. When they came to the threshing-floor of Atad, which is beyond the Jordan, they held there a very great and sorrowful lamentation; and he observed a time of mourning for his father for seven days. When the Canaanite inhabitants of the land saw the mourning on the threshing-floor of Atad, they said, 'This is a grievous mourning on the part of the Egyptians.' Therefore the place was named Abel-mizraim; it is beyond the Jordan. Thus his sons did for him as he had instructed them. They carried him to the land of Canaan and buried him in the cave of the field at Machpelah, the field near Mamre, which Abraham bought as a burial site from Ephron the Hittite. After he had buried his father, Joseph returned to Egypt with his brothers and all who had gone up with him to bury his father. 

Realizing that their father was dead, Joseph's brothers said, 'What if Joseph still bears a grudge against us and pays us back in full for all the wrong that we did to him?' So they approached Joseph, saying, 'Your father gave this instruction before he died, “Say to Joseph: I beg you, forgive the crime of your brothers and the wrong they did in harming you.” Now therefore please forgive the crime of the servants of the God of your father.' Joseph wept when they spoke to him. Then his brothers also wept, fell down before him, and said, 'We are here as your slaves.' But Joseph said to them, 'Do not be afraid! Am I in the place of God? Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today. So have no fear; I myself will provide for you and your little ones.' In this way he reassured them, speaking kindly to them. 

So Joseph remained in Egypt, he and his father's household; and Joseph lived for one hundred and ten years. Joseph saw Ephraim's children of the third generation; the children of Machir son of Manasseh were also born on Joseph's knees. 

Then Joseph said to his brothers, 'I am about to die; but God will surely come to you, and bring you up out of this land to the land that he swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.' So Joseph made the Israelites swear, saying, 'When God comes to you, you shall carry up my bones from here.' And Joseph died, being one hundred and ten years old; he was embalmed and placed in a coffin in Egypt. 

HYMN 
Words: John Austin (1613-1669)
Tune: Belgrave, Dunfermline

Behold, we come, dear Lord, to Thee, 
And bow before Thy throne; 
We come to offer on our knee
Our vows to Thee alone. 

Whate'er we have, whate'er we are,
Thy bounty freely gave;
Thou dost us here in mercy spare,
And wilt hereafter save.

Come then, my soul, bring all thy powers
And grieve thou hast no more;
Bring every day thy choicest hours,
And thy great God adore.

But, above all, prepare thine heart
On this, His own blest day,
In its sweet task to bear thy part,
And sing and love and pray.

SECOND READING [1 Corinthians 14:13-25]:

Therefore, one who speaks in a tongue should pray for the power to interpret. For if I pray in a tongue, my spirit prays but my mind is unproductive. What should I do then? I will pray with the spirit, but I will pray with the mind also; I will sing praise with the spirit, but I will sing praise with the mind also. Otherwise, if you say a blessing with the spirit, how can anyone in the position of an outsider say the 'Amen' to your thanksgiving, since the outsider does not know what you are saying? For you may give thanks well enough, but the other person is not built up. I thank God that I speak in tongues more than all of you; nevertheless, in church I would rather speak five words with my mind, in order to instruct others also, than ten thousand words in a tongue. 

Brothers and sisters, do not be children in your thinking; rather, be infants in evil, but in thinking be adults. In the law it is written,
'By people of strange tongues
   and by the lips of foreigners
I will speak to this people;
   yet even then they will not listen to me,'
says the Lord. Tongues, then, are a sign not for believers but for unbelievers, while prophecy is not for unbelievers but for believers. If, therefore, the whole church comes together and all speak in tongues, and outsiders or unbelievers enter, will they not say that you are out of your mind? But if all prophesy, an unbeliever or outsider who enters is reproved by all and called to account by all. After the secrets of the unbeliever's heart are disclosed, that person will bow down before God and worship him, declaring, 'God is really among you.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Merciful God, we praise you that you give strength for
every weakness, forgiveness for our failures, and new
beginnings in Jesus Christ. Especially we thank you for
     the guidance of your Spirit through this day... 
                                (We thank you, Lord.)
     signs of new life and hope...
     people who have helped us...
     those who struggle for justice...
     expressions of love unexpected or undeserved...

Almighty God, you know all needs before we speak our
prayers, yet you welcome our concerns for others in Jesus
Christ. Especially we pray for
     those who keep watch over the sick and dying...
                                (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     those who weep with the grieving...
     those who are without faith 
     and cannot accept your love...

     those who grow old...
     Reformed, Presbyterian, and Lutheran churches... 

O God, 
you have given us the Good News 
of your abounding love in your Son Jesus Christ: 
So fill our hearts with thankfulness 
that we may rejoice to proclaim 
the good tidings we have received; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

God our Savior, 
today we celebrate with joy 
the memory of your servant Harriet Monsell, 
and we give thanks for her faithfulness and love: 
May we, like her, serve you with generous hearts. 
We ask this in the name of Jesus Christ the Lord. Amen.

Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Help us, O Lord Jesus Christ,
to enter in your sorrows and to rejoice in your victory;
to embrace your cross and to wear your crown;
to receive the wounds of your love
and to behold you in glory and light;
for your own name's sake. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is by Thomas Ken (1637-1711) and the closing prayer is by St. Bridget of Sweden (1303-1373).



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