OREMUS: 20 March 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Mar 19 17:00:01 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Friday, March 20, 2009
Cuthbert, Bishop of Lindisfarne, Missionary, 687

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, God of compassion and mercy:
your steadfast love is shown to every living thing;
your word calls us forth and your law revives and refreshes.
You call us to repent our misuse of your gifts,
that we may be transformed by your wisdom
to manifest for others
the mercy of our crucified and risen Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
<!
http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html
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Psalm 86

Bow down your ear, O Lord, and answer me,*
 for I am poor and in misery.
Keep watch over my life, for I am faithful;*
 save your servant who trusts in you.
Be merciful to me, O Lord, for you are my God;*
 I call upon you all the day long.
Gladden the soul of your servant,*
 for to you, O Lord, I lift up my soul.
For you, O Lord, are good and forgiving,*
 and great is your love towards all who call upon you.
Give ear, O Lord, to my prayer,*
 and attend to the voice of my supplications.
In the time of my trouble I will call upon you,*
 for you will answer me.
Among the gods there is none like you, O Lord,*
 nor anything like your works.
All nations you have made
   will come and worship you, O Lord,*
 and glorify your name.
For you are great; you do wondrous things;*
 and you alone are God.
Teach me your way, O Lord,
   and I will walk in your truth;*
 knit my heart to you that I may fear your name.
I will thank you, O Lord my God, with all my heart,*
 and glorify your name for evermore.
For great is your love towards me;*
 you have delivered me from the nethermost Pit.
The arrogant rise up against me, O God,
   and a violent band seeks my life;*
 they have not set you before their eyes.
But you, O Lord, are gracious and full of compassion,*
 slow to anger and full of kindness and truth.
Turn to me and have mercy upon me;*
 give your strength to your servant;
   and save the child of your handmaid.
Show me a sign of your favour,
   so that those who hate me may see it and be ashamed;*
 because you, O Lord, have helped me and comforted me.

A Song of Christ the Servant 1 Peter 2.21b25 

Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example,  
that you should follow in his steps. 
He committed no sin, no guile was found on his lips,  
when he was reviled, he did not revile in turn. 
When he suffered, he did not threaten,  
but he trusted himself to God who judges justly. 
Christ himself bore our sins in his body on the tree,  
that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. 
By his wounds, you have been healed, 
for you were straying like sheep,  
but have now returned 
to the shepherd and guardian of your souls.

Psalm 149

Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a twoedged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.

FIRST READING [Genesis 42:1-26, 29a, 35-38]:

When Jacob learned that there was grain in Egypt, he said to his sons, 'Why do you keep looking at one another? I have heard', he said, 'that there is grain in Egypt; go down and buy grain for us there, that we may live and not die.' So ten of Joseph's brothers went down to buy grain in Egypt. But Jacob did not send Joseph's brother Benjamin with his brothers, for he feared that harm might come to him. Thus the sons of Israel were among the other people who came to buy grain, for the famine had reached the land of Canaan. 

Now Joseph was governor over the land; it was he who sold to all the people of the land. And Joseph's brothers came and bowed themselves before him with their faces to the ground. When Joseph saw his brothers, he recognized them, but he treated them like strangers and spoke harshly to them. 'Where do you come from?' he said. They said, 'From the land of Canaan, to buy food.' Although Joseph had recognized his brothers, they did not recognize him. Joseph also remembered the dreams that he had dreamed about them. He said to them, 'You are spies; you have come to see the nakedness of the land!' 
They said to him, 'No, my lord; your servants have come to buy food. We are all sons of one man; we are honest men; your servants have never been spies.' But he said to them, 'No, you have come to see the nakedness of the land!' They said, 'We, your servants, are twelve brothers, the sons of a certain man in the land of Canaan; the youngest, however, is now with our father, and one is no more.' But Joseph said to them, 'It is just as I have said to you; you are spies! Here is how you shall be tested: as Pharaoh lives, you shall not leave this place unless your youngest brother comes here! Let one of you go and bring your brother, while the rest of you remain in prison, in order that your words may be tested, whether there is truth in you; or else, as Pharaoh lives, surely you are spies.' And he put them all together in prison for three days. 

On the third day Joseph said to them, 'Do this and you will live, for I fear God: if you are honest men, let one of your brothers stay here where you are imprisoned. The rest of you shall go and carry grain for the famine of your households, and bring your youngest brother to me. Thus your words will be verified, and you shall not die.' And they agreed to do so. They said to one another, 'Alas, we are paying the penalty for what we did to our brother; we saw his anguish when he pleaded with us, but we would not listen. That is why this anguish has come upon us.' Then Reuben answered them, 'Did I not tell you not to wrong the boy? But you would not listen. So now there comes a reckoning for his blood.' They did not know that Joseph understood them, since he spoke with them through an interpreter. He turned away from them and wept; then he returned and spoke to them. And he picked out Simeon and had him bound before their eyes. Joseph then gave orders to fill their bags with grain, to return every man's money to his sack, and to give them provisions for their journey. This was done for them. 

They loaded their donkeys with their grain, and departed. 

When they came to their father Jacob in the land of Canaan, they told him all that had happened to them. As they were emptying their sacks, there in each one's sack was his bag of money. When they and their father saw their bundles of money, they were dismayed. And their father Jacob said to them, 'I am the one you have bereaved of children: Joseph is no more, and Simeon is no more, and now you would take Benjamin. All this has happened to me!' Then Reuben said to his father, 'You may kill my two sons if I do not bring him back to you. Put him in my hands, and I will bring him back to you.' But he said, 'My son shall not go down with you, for his brother is dead, and he alone is left. If harm should come to him on the journey that you are to make, you would bring down my grey hairs with sorrow to Sheol.' 

HYMN 
Words: Fred Pratt Green 1903-2000 (c) 1982 Stainer & Bell Ltd Used with permission.
Meter: 76 76 Trochaic; Suggested Tunes: Ich werd erfreut, Melling

Other gospel there is none 
Than the one Christ gave us; 
Love it is, and love alone, 
Has the power to save us.

Love is everywhere the same, 
Sacrifices, suffers;
Love it is that bears our shame, 
Love is what God offers.

Love is anxious to atone, 
Seeks for just decisions:
Love it is, and love alone,
Heals our deep divisions.

In God's Kingdom all are one, 
When, in love, we share it: 
What advances have been won 
Through the Holy Spirit!

In this spirit we must strive 
For the world's salvation, 
Offering all we have to give 
Without reservation.

SECOND READING [1 Corinthians 11:17-end]:

Now in the following instructions I do not commend you, because when you come together it is not for the better but for the worse. For, to begin with, when you come together as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you; and to some extent I believe it. Indeed, there have to be factions among you, for only so will it become clear who among you are genuine. When you come together, it is not really to eat the Lord's supper. For when the time comes to eat, each of you goes ahead with your own supper, and one goes hungry and another becomes drunk. What! Do you not have homes to eat and drink in? Or do you show contempt for the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What should I say to you? Should I commend you? In this matter I do not commend you! 

For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took a loaf of bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, 'This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.' In the same way he took the cup also, after supper, saying, 'This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.' For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes. 

Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be answerable for the body and blood of the Lord. Examine yourselves, and only then eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For all who eat and drink without discerning the body, eat and drink judgement against themselves. For this reason many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. But if we judged ourselves, we would not be judged. But when we are judged by the Lord, we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned along with the world. 

So then, my brothers and sisters, when you come together to eat, wait for one another. If you are hungry, eat at home, so that when you come together, it will not be for your condemnation. About the other things I will give instructions when I come. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
On the cross, our Lord offered himself to the Father for the whole
world. So, at the foot of his cross, we join our prayers with his.

We glory in your cross, O Lord,
and praise and glorify your holy resurrection;
For by virtue of the cross,
joy has come to the whole world.

God, be merciful to us and bless us,
and show us the light of your countenance
and be merciful to us
That your ways may be known upon earth,
your saving health among all nations.

We glory in your cross, O Lord,
and praise and glorify your holy resurrection;
For by virtue of the cross,
joy has come to the whole world.

Almighty Father,
look with mercy on this your family
for which our Lord Jesus Christ
was content to be betrayed
and was given up into the hands of the wicked
and to suffer death upon the cross;
who is alive and glorified
with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Almighty God,
who called your servant Cuthbert from following the flock
to follow your Son and to be a shepherd of your people:
in your mercy, grant that we, following his example,
may bring those who are lost home to your fold;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

God of love,
turn our hearts to your ways;
and give us peace. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases from _Opening
Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press,
Norwich, 1999.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Cuthbert was born in Northumbria in northern England about 625. One night,
while tending a herd of sheep, he saw lights in the sky which he interpreted as a
soul being escorted heavenward by a band of angels. Later, he learned that
Aidan of Lindisfarne (31 August 651) had died that night, and he resolved to
enter the monastic life. He was a monk at Melrose Abbey from 651 to 664, and
when the Abbot, Eata, became abbot and bishop at Lindisfarne, Cuthbert
accompanied him and was Prior there until 676. Although he had been brought
up in the Celtic customs, he accepted the decrees of the Synod of Whitby in
663, which committed the English Church to following instead the Roman
customs that had been introduced into Canterbury by Augustine, and so he
helped to minimize contention over the decision. Although his real preference
was for the solitary life of a hermit, he recognized a duty to minister to the
needs of the people about him. Year after year he made long journeys, on
horseback and on foot, to Durham and throughout Northumbria, and in the
regions of Berwick and Galloway, preaching to the scattered population in
remote and sparsely settled areas, instructing them in the faith and encouraging
them in the practice of it, urging them in times of sickness not to rely on
charms or amulets, but to pray to God and put their trust in His mercy and
love. Like Francis of Assisi, he had a remarkable rapport with animals, both
wild and domestic.
Theodore, the Archbishop of Canterbury, made Cuthbert Bishop of Hexham,
but he was a solitary by nature, and promptly exchanged bishoprics with Eata
so as to remain at Lindisfarne. After two years, he retired to the neighboring
island of Farne as a hermit, and died there the following year. [James Kiefer]



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