OREMUS: 5 June 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Jun 4 19:31:01 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Friday, June 5, 2009
Boniface (Wynfrith) of Crediton, Bishop, Apostle of Germany, Martyr, 754

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O Lord,
your love reaches to the heavens,
and your faithfulness to the clouds.
Your righteousness is like teh strong mountains,
your justice like the great deep;
you save your entire creation, O Lord,
in your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 122

I was glad when they said to me,*
 'Let us go to the house of the Lord.'
Now our feet are standing*
 within your gates, O Jerusalem.
Jerusalem is built as a city*
 that is at unity with itself.
To which the tribes go up, the tribes of the Lord,*
 the assembly of Israel, to praise the name of the Lord.
For there are the thrones of judgement,*
 the thrones of the house of David.
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:*
 'May they prosper who love you.
'Peace be within your walls*
 and quietness within your towers.
'For my family and companions' sake,*
 I pray for your prosperity.
'Because of the house of the Lord our God,*
 I will seek to do you good.'

Psalm 125

Those who trust in the Lord are like Mount Zion,*
 which cannot be moved, but stands fast for ever.
The hills stand about Jerusalem;*
 so does the Lord stand round about his people,
   from this time forth for evermore.
The sceptre of the wicked shall not hold sway
   over the land allotted to the just,*
 so that the just shall not put their hands to evil.
Show your goodness, O Lord, to those who are good*
 and to those who are true of heart.
As for those who turn aside to crooked ways,
   the Lord will lead them away with the evildoers;*
 but peace be upon Israel.

A Song of Humility (Hosea 6.1-6)

Come, let us return to the Lord  
who has torn us and will heal us. 
God has stricken us  
and will bind up our wounds. 
After two days, he will revive us,  
and on the third day will raise us up, 
that we may live in his presence. 
Let us strive to know the Lord;  
his appearing is as sure as the sunrise. 
He will come to us like the showers,  
like the spring rains that water the earth. 
'O Ephraim, how shall I deal with you?  
How shall I deal with you, O Judah? 
'Your love for me is like the morning mist,  
like the dew that goes early away. 
'Therefore, I have hewn them by the prophets,  
and my judgement goes forth as the light. 
'For loyalty is my desire and not sacrifice,  
and the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings.'

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a twoedged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Isaiah 61:1-9]:

The spirit of the Lord God is upon me,
   because the Lord has anointed me;
he has sent me to bring good news to the oppressed,
   to bind up the broken-hearted,
to proclaim liberty to the captives,
   and release to the prisoners; 
to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour,
   and the day of vengeance of our God;
   to comfort all who mourn; 
to provide for those who mourn in Zion—
   to give them a garland instead of ashes,
the oil of gladness instead of mourning,
   the mantle of praise instead of a faint spirit.
They will be called oaks of righteousness,
   the planting of the Lord, to display his glory. 
They shall build up the ancient ruins,
   they shall raise up the former devastations;
they shall repair the ruined cities,
   the devastations of many generations. 

Strangers shall stand and feed your flocks,
   foreigners shall till your land and dress your vines; 
but you shall be called priests of the Lord,
   you shall be named ministers of our God;
you shall enjoy the wealth of the nations,
   and in their riches you shall glory. 
Because their shame was double,
   and dishonour was proclaimed as their lot,
therefore they shall possess a double portion;
   everlasting joy shall be theirs. 

For I the Lord love justice,
   I hate robbery and wrongdoing;
I will faithfully give them their recompense,
   and I will make an everlasting covenant with them. 
Their descendants shall be known among the nations,
   and their offspring among the peoples;
all who see them shall acknowledge
   that they are a people whom the Lord has blessed. 

HYMN 
Words: verses 1-4: Philip Doddridge, 1736;
verse 5: unknown Scottish author
Tune: Burford, Stracathro, Dundee, Martyrdom

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/o/o172.html
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O God of Bethel, by whose hand
thy people still are fed;
who through this earthly pilgrimage
hast all our fathers led:

Our vows, our prayers, we now present
before thy throne of grace:
O God of Israel, be the God
of their succeeding race.

Through each perplexing path of life
our wandering footsteps guide;
give us each day our daily bread,
and raiment fit provide.

O spread thy covering wings around,
till all our wanderings cease,
and at our Father's loved abode
our souls arrive in peace!

Such blessings from thy gracious hand
our humble prayers implore;
and thou shalt be our covenant God
and portion evermore.

SECOND READING [2 Corinthians 3]:

Are we beginning to commend ourselves again? Surely we do not need, as some do, letters of recommendation to you or from you, do we? You yourselves are our letter, written on our hearts, to be known and read by all; and you show that you are a letter of Christ, prepared by us, written not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God, not on tablets of stone but on tablets of human hearts. 

Such is the confidence that we have through Christ towards God. Not that we are competent of ourselves to claim anything as coming from us; our competence is from God, who has made us competent to be ministers of a new covenant, not of letter but of spirit; for the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life. 

Now if the ministry of death, chiselled in letters on stone tablets, came in glory so that the people of Israel could not gaze at Moses’ face because of the glory of his face, a glory now set aside, how much more will the ministry of the Spirit come in glory? For if there was glory in the ministry of condemnation, much more does the ministry of justification abound in glory! Indeed, what once had glory has lost its glory because of the greater glory; for if what was set aside came through glory, much more has the permanent come in glory! 

Since, then, we have such a hope, we act with great boldness, not like Moses, who put a veil over his face to keep the people of Israel from gazing at the end of the glory that was being set aside. But their minds were hardened. Indeed, to this very day, when they hear the reading of the old covenant, that same veil is still there, since only in Christ is it set aside. Indeed, to this very day whenever Moses is read, a veil lies over their minds; but when one turns to the Lord, the veil is removed. Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And all of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another; for this comes from the Lord, the Spirit. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Beginning and End of all things,
we bless you for the present that is ever yielding

to your new heaven and new earth.

For all the means of grace,
we praise you, O Lord.

For every prompting of your Spirit
we praise you, O Lord.

We yield our cares to your unceasing mercy:
Attend the sick and the suffering,
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Touch the dying:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Claim the newborn:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Shelter the homeless:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Sing in the fearful:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Chasten the arrogant and powerful:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Lift up the lowly:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Center the Church:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Grant peace to Jerusalem and every people:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

Shape our lives by the mystery 
of Christ crucified, risen and interceding for us:
In your mercy, Lord, hear us.

God of our joy and gladness,
hear our prayer for the peace of this world
and bring us at last,

with all our companions in faith,
to the peace of that city where you live and reign,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit,
now and to all eternity. Amen.
		
God our redeemer, 
who called your servant Boniface 
to preach the gospel among the German people
and to build up your Church in holiness: 
grant that we may preserve in our hearts
that faith which he taught with his words
and sealed with his blood,
and profess it in lives dedicated to your Son
Jesus Christ our Lord, 
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May we feast at your abundant table, O Lord,
and drink from the river of your delights. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from Psalm 36.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Wynfrith, nicknamed Boniface ("good deeds"), was born around 680 near
Crediton in Devonshire, England. When he was five, he listened to some
monks who were staying at his father's house. They had returned from a
mission to the pagans on the continent, and Boniface was so impressed by
them that he resolved to follow their example. Although his father had intended
him for a secular career, he gave way to his son's entreaties and sent him at the
age of seven to a monastery school. He eventually became director of the
school at Nursling, in Winchester, where he wrote the first Latin grammar in
England, and gave lectures that were widely copied and circulated.
At thirty, he was ordained and set out to preach in Friesland (overlaps with
modern Holland), whence he was soon expelled because of war between its
heathen king and Charles Martel of France. Boniface, after a brief withdrawal,
went into Hesse and Bavaria, having secured the support of the Pope and of
Charles Martel for his work there. In Hesse, in the presence of a large crowd
of pagans, he cut down the Sacred Oak of Geismar, a tree of immense age and
girth, sacred to the god Thor. It is said that after only a few blows of his axe,
the tree tottered and crashed to the ground, breaking into four pieces and
revealing itself to be rotted away within. It was the beginning of a highly
successful missionary effort, and the planting of a vigorous Christian church in
Germany, where Boniface was eventually consecrated bishop. He asked the
Christian Saxons of England to support his work among their kinsmen on the
continent, and they responded with money, books, supplies, and above all, with
a steady supply of monks to assist him in teaching and preaching.
Boniface did not confine his attentions to Germany. He worked to establish
cooperation between the Pope and others in Italy on the one hand and Charles
and his successors in France on the other. He persuaded Carloman and Pepin,
the sons of Charles, to call synods for the reform of the church in their
territories, where under previous rulers bishoprics had often been sold to the
highest bidder. He never forgot his initial failure in Friesland, and in old age
resigned his bishopric and returned to work there. Many Frisians had been
converted earlier by Willibrord (another Saxon missionary from England), but
had lapsed after his death. Boniface preached among them with considerable
success. On June 5, the eve of Pentecost, 754, he was preparing a group of
Frisians for confirmation when they were attacked and killed by heathen
warriors.



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