OREMUS: 27 July 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Jul 26 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Monday, July 27, 2009
William Reed Huntington, Priest, 1909

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
you are our greatest treasure
and the source of our greatest joy:
Your Spirit continues to form us in the likeness of Christ,
that we may know the freedom of your children
and the assurance that nothing in creation
can separate us from your love,
most fully known in Jesus Christ our Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 75

We give you thanks, O God, we give you thanks,*
 calling upon your name
   and declaring all your wonderful deeds.
'I will appoint a time,' says God;*
 'I will judge with equity.
'Though the earth and all its inhabitants are quaking,*
 I will make its pillars fast.
'I will say to the boasters, "Boast no more",*
 and to the wicked, "Do not toss your horns;
'"Do not toss your horns so high,*
 nor speak with a proud neck."'
For judgement is neither from the east
   nor from the west,*
 nor yet from the wilderness or the mountains.
It is God who judges;*
 he puts down one and lifts up another.
For in the Lord's hand there is a cup,
   full of spiced and foaming wine, which he pours out,*
 and all the wicked of the earth
   shall drink and drain the dregs.
But I will rejoice for ever;*
 I will sing praises to the God of Jacob.
He shall break off all the horns of the wicked;*
 but the horns of the righteous shall be exalted.

Psalm 76

In Judah is God known;*
 his name is great in Israel.
At Salem is his tabernacle,*
 and his dwelling is in Zion.
There he broke the flashing arrows,*
 the shield, the sword and the weapons of battle.
How glorious you are!*
 more splendid than the everlasting mountains!
The strong of heart have been despoiled;
   they sink into sleep;*
 none of the warriors can lift a hand.
At your rebuke, O God of Jacob,*
 both horse and rider lie stunned.
What terror you inspire!*
 who can stand before you when you are angry?
>From heaven you pronounced judgement;*
 the earth was afraid and was still;
When God rose up to judgement*
 and to save all the oppressed of the earth.
Truly, wrathful Edom will give you thanks,*
 and the remnant of Hamath will keep your feasts.
Make a vow to the Lord your God and keep it;*
 let all around him bring gifts
   to him who is worthy to be feared.
He breaks the spirit of princes,*
 and strikes terror in the kings of the earth.

A Song of Ezekiel (Ezekiel 36.2426,28b)

I will take you from the nations,  
and gather you from all the countries. 
I will sprinkle clean water upon you,  
and you shall be clean from all your uncleannesses. 
A new heart I will give you,  
and put a new spirit within you, 
And I will remove from your body the heart of stone  
and give you a heart of flesh. 
You shall be my people,  
and I will be your God.

Psalm 146

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord, O my soul!*
 I will praise the Lord as long as I live;
   I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.
Put not your trust in rulers,
   nor in any child of earth,*
 for there is no help in them.
When they breathe their last, they return to earth,*
 and in that day their thoughts perish.
Happy are they who have the God of Jacob
   for their help!*
 whose hope is in the Lord their God;
Who made heaven and earth, the seas,
   and all that is in them;*
 who keeps his promise for ever;
Who gives justice to those who are oppressed,*
 and food to those who hunger.
The Lord sets the prisoners free;
   the Lord opens the eyes of the blind;*
 the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down;
The Lord loves the righteous;
   the Lord cares for the stranger;*
 he sustains the orphan and widow,
   but frustrates the way of the wicked.
The Lord shall reign for ever,*
 your God, O Zion, throughout all generations.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [1 Samuel 8:4-end]:

Then all the elders of Israel gathered together and came to Samuel at Ramah, and said to him, 'You are old and your sons do not follow in your ways; appoint for us, then, a king to govern us, like other nations.' But the thing displeased Samuel when they said, 'Give us a king to govern us.' Samuel prayed to the Lord, and the Lord said to Samuel, 'Listen to the voice of the people in all that they say to you; for they have not rejected you, but they have rejected me from being king over them. Just as they have done to me, from the day I brought them up out of Egypt to this day, forsaking me and serving other gods, so also they are doing to you. Now then, listen to their voice; only—you shall solemnly warn them, and show them the ways of the king who shall reign over them.' 

So Samuel reported all the words of the Lord to the people who were asking him for a king. He said, 'These will be the ways of the king who will reign over you: he will take your sons and appoint them to his chariots and to be his horsemen, and to run before his chariots; and he will appoint for himself commanders of thousands and commanders of fifties, and some to plough his ground and to reap his harvest, and to make his implements of war and the equipment of his chariots. He will take your daughters to be perfumers and cooks and bakers. He will take the best of your fields and vineyards and olive orchards and give them to his courtiers. He will take one-tenth of your grain and of your vineyards and give it to his officers and his courtiers. He will take your male and female slaves, and the best of your cattle and donkeys, and put them to his work. He will take one-tenth of your flocks, and you shall be his slaves. And in that day you will cry out because of your king, whom you have chosen for yourselves; but the Lord will not answer you in that day.' 

But the people refused to listen to the voice of Samuel; they said, 'No! but we are determined to have a king over us, so that we also may be like other nations, and that our king may govern us and go out before us and fight our battles.' When Samuel had heard all the words of the people, he repeated them in the ears of the Lord. The Lord said to Samuel, 'Listen to their voice and set a king over them.' Samuel then said to the people of Israel, 'Each of you return home.' 

HYMN 
Words: Charles Wesley (1707-1788)
Tune: St Flavian, Warwick, York

Come, O thou all-victorious Lord,
Thy power to us make known;
Strike with the hammer of thy word,
And break these hearts of stone.

Give us ourselves and thee to know,
In this our gracious day;
Repentance unto life bestow,
And take our sins away.

Conclude us first in unbelief,
And freely then release;
Fill every soul with sacred grief,
And then with sacred peace.

Impoverish, Lord, and then relieve,
And then enrich the poor;
The knowledge of our sickness give,
The knowledge of our cure.

That blessèd sense of guilt impart,
And then remove the load;
Trouble, and wash the troubled heart
In the atoning blood.

Our desperate state through sin declare,
And speak our sins forgiven;
By perfect holiness prepare,
And take us up to heaven.

SECOND READING [Luke 13:1-9]:

At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. He asked them, 'Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.' 

Then he told this parable: 'A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, "See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?" He replied, "Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig round it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down." ' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Creator and Sustainer of life, God,

who ever calls us back
to his ways of justice and peace:
we thank you for the gift of the land,
for its beauty, and its resources,
and the rich heritage we enjoy.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

And so we pray:
for those who make decisions about our land and its resources;
for those who work on the land and sea, 
in our cities, and in commerce and industry;
for artists, scientists, politicians, and visionaries.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

We thank you for giving us life, and for giving us our life together.
We pray for all who through their own or others( actions
are deprived of fullness of life;
for all who know sickness, disability, and an untimely death;
for all who devote their lives to ministering to the needs of others.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

Give us reverence for life in this, your created world.
May we reflect the goodness of your creation
in the society we create with and for one another.
Merciful, mighty God:
hear our prayer.

Almighty God, 
whose most dear Son went not up to joy but first he suffered pain, 
and entered not into glory before he was crucified: 
Mercifully grant that we, walking in the way of the cross, 
may find it none other than the way of life and peace; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O Lord our God, 
we thank you for instilling in the heart 
of your servant William Reed Huntington 
a fervent love for your Church 
and its mission in the world; 
and we pray that, with unflagging faith in your promises, 
we may make known to all people 
your blessed gift of eternal life; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May we instructed by your heavenly law, O Lord,
that we may embrace the example of your Son
and show it forth in deeds and works of love. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer and closing sentence are adapted from prayers by Alan Griffiths..

W R Huntington, although never a bishop, had more influence on the Episcopal  Church than most bishops. He was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1838, the son of a physician, studied at Harvard, and was ordained a priest in 1862. In each of the thirteen General Conventions (held every three years, in years that have a remainder of 2 when divided by 3) of the Episcopal Church that met between 1870 and his death, he was a member, and indeed the most prominent member, of the House of Deputies. In 1871 he moved for the restoration of the ancient Order of Deaconesses, which was finally officially authorized in 1889. His parish became a center for the training of deaconesses. Huntington's was the chief voice calling for a revision of the Book of Common Prayer (completed in 1892), and his the greatest single influence on the process of revision. The prayers he wrote for it is the first collect above
In his book The Church Idea (1870), Huntington undertook to discuss the basis of
Christian unity, and he formulated the Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral, a statement
adopted first by the House of Bishops of the Episcopal Church in 1886 and then, with
slight modifications, by the Bishops of the world-wide Anglican Communion assembled at Lambeth in 1888. The statement set forth four principles which Anglicans regard as essential, and offer as a basis for discussion of union with other Christian bodies. [James Kiefer]



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