OREMUS: 30 January 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Jan 29 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Friday, January 30, 2009
Charles, King and Martyr, 1649

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God,
for the radiance of your Christ,
a light which has dawned for those
who walked in the shadow of death.
We sing the wonders of your saving power
and for the many gifts you bestow on us.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 51

Have mercy on me, O God,
   according to your lovingkindness;*
 in your great compassion blot out my offences.
Wash me through and through from my wickedness*
 and cleanse me from my sin.
For I know my transgressions,*
 and my sin is ever before me.
Against you only have I sinned*
 and done what is evil in your sight.
And so you are justified when you speak*
 and upright in your judgement.
Indeed, I have been wicked from my birth,*
 a sinner from my mother's womb.
For behold, you look for truth deep within me,*
 and will make me understand wisdom secretly.
Purge me from my sin and I shall be pure;*
 wash me and I shall be clean indeed.
Make me hear of joy and gladness,*
 that the body you have broken may rejoice.
Hide your face from my sins*
 and blot out all my iniquities.
Create in me a clean heart, O God,*
 and renew a right spirit within me.
Cast me not away from your presence*
 and take not your holy Spirit from me.
Give me the joy of your saving help again*
 and sustain me with your bountiful Spirit.
I shall teach your ways to the wicked,*
 and sinners shall return to you.
Deliver me from death, O God,*
 and my tongue shall sing of your righteousness,
   O God of my salvation.
Open my lips, O Lord,*
 and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
Had you desired it, I would have offered sacrifice,*
 but you take no delight in burntofferings.
The sacrifice of God is a troubled spirit;*
 a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.
Be favourable and gracious to Zion,*
 and rebuild the walls of Jerusalem.
Then you will be pleased with the appointed sacrifices,
   with burntofferings and oblations;*

 then shall they offer young bullocks upon your altar.

A Song of Praise (Revelation 4.11; 5.9b,10)

You are worthy, our Lord and God,  
to receive glory and honour and power. 
For you have created all things,  
and by your will they have their being. 
You are worthy, O Lamb, for you were slain,  
and by your blood you ransomed for God 
saints from every tribe and language and nation. 
You have made them to be a kingdom and priests 
serving our God,  
and they will reign with you on earth.

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a twoedged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Proverbs 15:16-23, 27-29]:

Better is a little with the fear of the Lord
   than great treasure and trouble with it. 
Better is a dinner of vegetables where love is
   than a fatted ox and hatred with it. 
Those who are hot-tempered stir up strife, 
   but those who are slow to anger calm contention. 
The way of the lazy is overgrown with thorns, 
   but the path of the upright is a level highway. 
A wise child makes a glad father, 
   but the foolish despise their mothers. 
Folly is a joy to one who has no sense, 
   but a person of understanding walks straight ahead. 
Without counsel, plans go wrong, 
   but with many advisers they succeed. 
To make an apt answer is a joy to anyone, 
   and a word in season, how good it is! 
Those who are greedy for unjust gain make trouble for their households, 
   but those who hate bribes will live. 
The mind of the righteous ponders how to answer, 
   but the mouth of the wicked pours out evil. 
The Lord is far from the wicked, 
   but he hears the prayer of the righteous.

HYMN 
Words: Jerusalem luminosa, Attributed to Thomas à Kempis (1379-1471) translated by John M Neale (1818-1866)
Tune: Urbs beata, Regent Square, Westminster Abbey

Light's abode, celestial Salem,
Vision whence true peace doth spring,
Brighter than the heart can fancy,
Mansion of the highest King;
O how glorious are the praises
Which of thee the prophets sing!

There for ever and for ever
Alleluia is out-poured;
For unending, for unbroken
Is the feast-day of the Lord;
All is pure and all is holy
That within thy walls is stored.

There no cloud nor passing vapour
Dims the brightness of the air;
Endless noon-day, glorious noon-day
>From the Sun of suns is there;
There no night brings rest from labour
For unknown are toil and care.

O how glorious and resplendent,
Fragile body, shalt thou be,
When endued with so much beauty,
Full of health, and strong and free,
Full of vigour, full of pleasure
That shall last eternally!

Now with gladness, now with courage,
Bear the burden on thee laid,
That hereafter these thy labours
May with endless gifts be paid;
And in everlasting glory
Thou with brightness be arrayed.

SECOND READING [Philippians 3:17-4:3]:

Brothers and sisters, join in imitating me, and observe those who live according to the example you have in us. For many live as enemies of the cross of Christ; I have often told you of them, and now I tell you even with tears. Their end is destruction; their god is the belly; and their glory is in their shame; their minds are set on earthly things. But our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ. He will transform the body of our humiliation so that it may be conformed to the body of his glory, by the power that also enables him to make all things subject to himself. Therefore, my brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved.

I urge Euodia and I urge Syntyche to be of the same mind in the Lord. Yes, and I ask you also, my loyal companion, help these women, for they have struggled beside me in the work of the gospel, together with Clement and the rest of my co-workers, whose names are in the book of life. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We pray for the coming of God's kingdom, saying,
Father, by your Spirit:
bring in your kingdom.

You came in Jesus to bring good news to the poor, 
sight to the blind, freedom to the captives, 
and salvation to your people:
anoint us with your Spirit; 

rouse us to work in his name.
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to bring help to the poor 
and freedom to the oppressed:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to tell the world 
the good news of your healing love:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to those who mourn,
to bring joy and gladness instead of grief:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to proclaim that the time is here
for you to save your people:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Take away, O Lord, the sin that corrupts us;
restore by grace your own image within us;
give us the sorrow that heals
and the joy that praises,
that we may take our place among your people,
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O God, the Judge of all,
you anointed Charles Stuart
to be King of England and Scotland
and sustained him in prayer through all his troubles,
even to death at the hands of his enemies.
Grant that all rulers among the nations
may use the power entrusted to their care
to vindicate the cause of those who suffer wrong
and to rescue the needy among the people;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May Christ, who calls us,
make us ready witnesses to him
and multiply the number of those who acknowledge you
and celebrate your holy Name. Amen.

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The psalms and first collect are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from
_Celebrating the Christian Year_ (c) Canterbury Press, Norwich.

The intercession is from _Patterns for Worship_, material from which is included in this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops( Council, 1995. 

Born in 1600, the second son of James the First, Charles became heir apparent when he was twelve years old on the death of his brother. He succeeded to the throne in 1625, where he came up against the increasing power of an antagonistic Parliament. Combined with the religious puritanism which was prevalent, this made Charles staunch in his resistance of the power of either force in the land. He frequently dismissed sittings of Parliament and tried to enforce high-church Anglican practice on all, throughout both kingdoms of England and Scotland. Opposition resulted in civil war. After Charles' imprisonment and trial, he was put to death on this day in 1649. Although some see him as a victim of his own pride, his faith and willingness to suffer and die for what he believed in are not in doubt.  [Exciting Holiness]



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