OREMUS: 3 February 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Feb 2 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Tuesday, February 3, 2009
Anskar, Archbishop of Hamburg, Missionary in Denmark and Sweden, 865

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God of all the prophets,
you knew us and chose us
before you formed us in the womb. 
You fill us with faith that speaks your word,
hope that does not disappoint,
and love that bears all things for your sake,
until that day when we shall know you fully,
even as we are known by you.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 71

In you, O Lord, have I taken refuge;*
 let me never be ashamed.
In your righteousness, deliver me and set me free;*
 incline your ear to me and save me.
Be my strong rock, a castle to keep me safe;*
 you are my crag and my stronghold.
Deliver me, my God, from the hand of the wicked,*
 from the clutches of the evildoer and the oppressor.
For you are my hope, O Lord God,*
 my confidence since I was young.
I have been sustained by you ever since I was born;
   from my mother's womb you have been my strength;*
 my praise shall be always of you.
I have become a portent to many;*
 but you are my refuge and my strength.
Let my mouth be full of your praise*
 and your glory all the day long.
Do not cast me off in my old age;*
 forsake me not when my strength fails.
For my enemies are talking against me,*
 and those who lie in wait for my life
   take counsel together.
They say, 'God has forsaken him;
   go after him and seize him;*
 because there is none who will save.'
O God, be not far from me;*
 come quickly to help me, O my God.
Let those who set themselves against me
   be put to shame and be disgraced;*
 let those who seek to do me evil
   be covered with scorn and reproach.
But I shall always wait in patience,*
 and shall praise you more and more.
My mouth shall recount your mighty acts
   and saving deeds all day long;*
 though I cannot know the number of them.
I will begin with the mighty works of the Lord God;*
 I will recall your righteousness, yours alone.
O God, you have taught me since I was young,*
 and to this day I tell of your wonderful works.
And now that I am old and greyheaded, O God,
   do not forsake me,*

 till I make known your strength to this generation
   and your power to all who are to come.
Your righteousness, O God, reaches to the heavens;*
 you have done great things; who is like you, O God?
You have showed me great troubles and adversities,*
 but you will restore my life and bring me up again
   from the deep places of the earth.
You strengthen me more and more;*
 you enfold and comfort me,
Therefore I will praise you upon the lyre
   for your faithfulness, O my God;*
 I will sing to you with the harp, O Holy One of Israel.
My lips will sing with joy when I play to you,*
 and so will my soul, which you have redeemed.
My tongue will proclaim your righteousness all day long,*
 for they are ashamed and disgraced
   who sought to do me harm.

A Song of God(s Chosen One (Isaiah 11.1,2,3b4a,6,9)

There shall come forth a shoot from the stock of Jesse,  
and a branch shall grow out of his roots. 
And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him,  
the spirit of wisdom and understanding, 
The spirit of counsel and might,  
the spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord. 
He shall not judge by what his eyes see,  
or decide by what his ears hear, 
But with righteousness he shall judge the poor,  
and decide with equity for the meek of the earth. 
The wolf shall dwell with the lamb,  
and the leopard shall lie down with the kid. 
The calf, the lion and the fatling together,  
with a little child to lead them. 
They shall not hurt or destroy in all my holy mountain,  
for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord 
as the waters cover the sea.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;

But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Proverbs 21:21-end]:

Whoever pursues righteousness and kindness
   will find life and honour. 
One wise person went up against a city of warriors
   and brought down the stronghold in which they trusted. 
To watch over mouth and tongue
   is to keep out of trouble. 
The proud, haughty person, named ‘Scoffer’, 
   acts with arrogant pride. 
The craving of the lazy person is fatal, 
   for lazy hands refuse to labour. 
All day long the wicked covet, 
   but the righteous give and do not hold back. 
The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination; 
   how much more when brought with evil intent. 
A false witness will perish, 
   but a good listener will testify successfully. 
The wicked put on a bold face, 
   but the upright give thought to their ways. 
No wisdom, no understanding, no counsel, 
   can avail against the Lord. 
The horse is made ready for the day of battle, 
   but the victory belongs to the Lord.

HYMN 
Words: Kirden den er et gammelt hus by N. F. S. Grundtvig (1783-1872) translated by Alan Gaunt (born 1935) from a literal translation by Enid Luff. English translation © 1998 Stainer & Bell Ltd. Used with permission.
Meter: 88 88 88

Ancient and sure, the Church will stand
Even though towers are falling;
Towers come crashing to the ground,
Bells go on pealing and calling:
Hear, young and old in your distress,
Hear, souls weighed down with weariness,
Yearning for rest and salvation.

Houses we build do not contain
God in his holy perfection;
Earth's holiest place will not retain
More than its palest reflection.
And yet God builds a dwelling place,
Wondrously raised by heaven's grace
Out of this earth's dust and ashes.

We are God's house and church today,
Living stones, chosen, well-founded;
Under the cross, baptised, we stay
Built up in faith, firmly grounded.
Were we, on earth, no more than two,
God would still build, and still renew
His life and dwelling place in us.

Meeting our king here face to face,
Finding, with Peter, 'God with us,'
We would not change the humblest place,
Not for the world and its treasures.
God keeps his word and, ever near
Within our hearts, is speaking here,
Present as Lord of creation.

Houses called churches, built on earth,
Honour our Lord, who embraces
Children like us who, from our birth,
Love to come home to these places.
Here such delightful things are heard,
He seals his covenant with his word,
Gives us the Kingdom of Heaven.

Here, at the font, our lives were claimed,
Here at his table he feeds us,
Here we have heard his word proclaimed,
Here his love's mystery leads us.
Present today as yesterday,
God's Son reminds us he will stay
Ever our Christ and Redeemer.

God grant, wherever through the year,
Summoned by bells, we are praying,
That, in their pealing, people hear
This word that Jesus is saying:
'The world does not see me, but you,
You see that all I say comes true:
My peace is with you for ever.' 

SECOND READING [Colossians 1:18-2:5]:

Jesus Christ is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that he might come to have first place in everything. For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him God was pleased to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, by making peace through the blood of his cross. 

And you who were once estranged and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through death, so as to present you holy and blameless and irreproachable before him— provided that you continue securely established and steadfast in the faith, without shifting from the hope promised by the gospel that you heard, which has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven. I, Paul, became a servant of this gospel. 

I am now rejoicing in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am completing what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church. I became its servant according to God’s commission that was given to me for you, to make the word of God fully known, the mystery that has been hidden throughout the ages and generations but has now been revealed to his saints. To them God chose to make known how great among the Gentiles are the riches of the glory of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory. It is he whom we proclaim, warning everyone and teaching everyone in all wisdom, so that we may present everyone mature in Christ. For this I toil and struggle with all the energy that he powerfully inspires within me. 

For I want you to know how much I am struggling for you, and for those in Laodicea, and for all who have not seen me face to face. I want their hearts to be encouraged and united in love, so that they may have all the riches of assured understanding and have the knowledge of God’s mystery, that is, Christ himself, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. I am saying this so that no one may deceive you with plausible arguments. For though I am absent in body, yet I am with you in spirit, and I rejoice to see your morale and the firmness of your faith in Christ. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Ever-present Spirit of God,
as we abide with you and you with us,
we cry out for our brothers and sisters:
Healing Spirit,
hear our prayer.

For all who suffer want, loneliness or depression:
Healing Spirit,
hear our prayer.

For racial, cultural and national groups
who suffer prejudice, oppressive leaders
or economic exploitation.
Healing Spirit,
hear our prayer.

For the Church in those places where it suffers
blindness, controversy, disorientation,
persecution or change.
Healing Spirit,
hear our prayer.

For those we have to tried to love and serve today.
Healing Spirit,
hear our prayer.

Faithful God, living Saviour,
in youth and old age,
in weakness and adversity,
from the womb to the grave,
may we know your protection
and proclaim your great salvation
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty and everlasting God, 
you sent your servant Anskar 
as an apostle to the people of Scandinavia, 
and enabled him to lay a firm foundation for their conversion, 
though he did not see the results of his labors: 
Keep your Church from discouragement in the day of small things, 
knowing than when you have begun a good work 
you will bring it to a faithful conclusion; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Open our imaginations to new dimensions of your love,
and heal us of all that severs us from you and one another;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from
prayers reprinted from _Revised Common Lectionary Prayers_,
copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts.

The intercession is adapted from a prayer reprinted from _THE DAILY
OFFICE: A Book of Hours of Daily Prayer after the Use of the Order of Saint
Luke_, (c) 1997 by The Order of Saint Luke. Used by permission.

The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

 Anskar (in Latin, Ansgarius) was a monk of Saxon family, born in 801 (the
year after the crowning of Charlemagne). In 826, when King Harald of
Denmark asked Charlemagne's successors for missionaries, Anskar led a group
to Denmark, and a few years later to Sweden. Because of unsettled political
conditions, his work ran into difficulties, and Anskar withdrew into Germany,
where he served as first Archbishop of Hamburg. Later, however, he helped to
consecrate Gotbert, the first bishop of Sweden. The Church of Sweden honors
him as its apostle, and he serves as symbol of the historic friendship and
present-day connection between the Anglican Churches and the Church of
Sweden. [James Kiefer]


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