OREMUS: 28 August 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Aug 27 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Friday, August 28, 2009
Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, Teacher of the Faith, 430

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
like fireworks in the night
the Holy Spirit came
to lift our spirits, to inspire fresh daring,
that our lives might be spent in honor
of our Savior, God's only Son.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 94

O Lord God of vengeance,*
 O God of vengeance, show yourself.
Rise up, O Judge of the world;*
 give the arrogant their just deserts.
How long shall the wicked, O Lord,*
 how long shall the wicked triumph?
They bluster in their insolence;*
 all evildoers are full of boasting.
They crush your people, O Lord,*
 and afflict your chosen nation.
They murder the widow and the stranger*
 and put the orphans to death.
Yet they say, 'The Lord does not see,*
 the God of Jacob takes no notice.'
Consider well, you dullards among the people;*
 when will you fools understand?
He that planted the ear, does he not hear?*
 he that formed the eye, does he not see?
He who admonishes the nations, will he not punish?*
 he who teaches all the world, has he no knowledge?
The Lord knows our human thoughts;*
 how like a puff of wind they are.
Happy are they whom you instruct, O Lord!*
 whom you teach out of your law;
To give them rest in evil days,*
 until a pit is dug for the wicked.
For the Lord will not abandon his people,*
 nor will he forsake his own.
For judgement will again be just,*
 and all the true of heart will follow it.
Who rose up for me against the wicked?*
 who took my part against the evildoers?
If the Lord had not come to my help,*
 I should soon have dwelt in the land of silence.
As often as I said, 'My foot has slipped',*
 your love, O Lord, upheld me.
When many cares fill my mind,*
 your consolations cheer my soul.
Can a corrupt tribunal have any part with you,*
 one which frames evil into law?
They conspire against the life of the just*
 and condemn the innocent to death.

But the Lord has become my stronghold,*
 and my God the rock of my trust.
He will turn their wickedness back upon them
   and destroy them in their own malice;*
 the Lord our God will destroy them.

A Song of Christ the Servant 1 Peter 2.21b25 

Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example,  
that you should follow in his steps. 
He committed no sin, no guile was found on his lips,  
when he was reviled, he did not revile in turn. 
When he suffered, he did not threaten,  
but he trusted himself to God who judges justly. 
Christ himself bore our sins in his body on the tree,  
that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. 
By his wounds, you have been healed, 
for you were straying like sheep,  
but have now returned 
to the shepherd and guardian of your souls.

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a twoedged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Habakkuk 2:9-14, 19-20]:

'Alas for you who get evil gain for your houses,
   setting your nest on high
   to be safe from the reach of harm!' 
You have devised shame for your house
   by cutting off many peoples;
   you have forfeited your life. 
The very stones will cry out from the wall,
   and the plaster will respond from the woodwork. 

'Alas for you who build a town by bloodshed,
   and found a city on iniquity!' 
Is it not from the Lord of hosts
   that peoples labour only to feed the flames,
   and nations weary themselves for nothing? 
But the earth will be filled
   with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord,
   as the waters cover the sea. 

Alas for you who say to the wood, 'Wake up!'
   to silent stone, 'Rouse yourself!'
   Can it teach?
See, it is plated with gold and silver,
   and there is no breath in it at all. 

But the Lord is in his holy temple;
   let all the earth keep silence before him! 

HYMN 
Words: Timothy Dudley-Smith (c), based on a prayer by Augustine
Tune: Genevan Psalm 130, Llangloffan, Moville, King's Lynn, Aurelia

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l145.html
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Light of the minds that know him,
may Christ be light to mine!
My sun in risen splendor,
my light of truth divine;
my guide in doubt and darkness,
my true and living way,
my clear light ever shining,
my dawn of heaven's day.

Life of the souls that love him,
may Christ be ours indeed!
The living Bread from heaven
on whom our spirits feed;
who died for love of sinners
to bear our guilty load,
and make of life's journey
a new Emmaus road.

Strength of the wills that serve him,
may Christ be strength to me,
who stilled the storm and tempest,
who calmed the tossing sea;
his Spirit's power to move me,
his will to master mine,
his cross to carry daily
and conquer in his sign.

May it be ours to know him
that we may truly love,
and loving, fully serve him
as serve the saints above;
till in that home of glory
with fadeless splendor bright,
we serve in perfect freedom
our strength, our life, our light.

SECOND READING [Luke 22:47-62]:

While he was still speaking, suddenly a crowd came, and the one called Judas, one of the twelve, was leading them. He approached Jesus to kiss him; but Jesus said to him, 'Judas, is it with a kiss that you are betraying the Son of Man?' When those who were around him saw what was coming, they asked, 'Lord, should we strike with the sword?' Then one of them struck the slave of the high priest and cut off his right ear. But Jesus said, 'No more of this!' And he touched his ear and healed him. Then Jesus said to the chief priests, the officers of the temple police, and the elders who had come for him, 'Have you come out with swords and clubs as if I were a bandit? When I was with you day after day in the temple, you did not lay hands on me. But this is your hour, and the power of darkness!' 

Then they seized him and led him away, bringing him into the high priest's house. But Peter was following at a distance. When they had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and sat down together, Peter sat among them. Then a servant-girl, seeing him in the firelight, stared at him and said, 'This man also was with him.' But he denied it, saying, 'Woman, I do not know him.' A little later someone else, on seeing him, said, 'You also are one of them.' But Peter said, 'Man, I am not!' Then about an hour later yet another kept insisting, 'Surely this man also was with him; for he is a Galilean.' But Peter said, 'Man, I do not know what you are talking about!' At that moment, while he was still speaking, the cock crowed. The Lord turned and looked at Peter. Then Peter remembered the word of the Lord, how he had said to him, 'Before the cock crows today, you will deny me three times.' And he went out and wept bitterly. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Planting God,
how beautiful on the mountains are the feet of those
who bring good news.

Around your table we are bound together as your Body
for the life of the world.
Grant us a grower(s wisdom, O Lord.

Deliver us from impatience
that will not wait for fruit to ripen:
Grant us a grower(s wisdom, O Lord.

Save us from forcing others to see what we see
and embrace what we embrace:
Grant us a grower(s wisdom, O Lord.

Liberate us from anger rooted in self-justification:
Grant us a grower(s wisdom, O Lord.

Fix our gaze upon you
so that we are not overwhelmed by the want and failure of others:
Grant us a grower(s wisdom, O Lord.

Sow yourself in our words and deeds
that become food for hungry souls:
Grant us a grower(s wisdom, O Lord.

Eternal Love,
our hearts are restless until they rest in you.
Let your glory shine on us,
that our lives may proclaim your goodness,
our work give you honour,
and our voices praise you forever;
for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Merciful Lord, 
who turned Augustine from his sins 
to be a faithful bishop and teacher: 
grant that we may follow him in penitence and discipline 
till our restless hearts find their rest in you; 
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the word of God dwell richly in our heart from hour to hour, 
so that all may see the triumph through Jesus' power and love. 
Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is by Stephen Benner. The closing prayer is a sentence from
_Uniting in Worship_, The Uniting Church in Australia.

Hymn (c) 1984 by Hope Publishing Co., Carol Stream, IL  60188. All rights reserved. 
Used by permission. For permission to reproduce this text in all territories except the UK,
Europe & Africa, contact: Hope Publishing Company,  www.hopepublishing.com
For UK, Europe & Africa: contact: Bishop Timothy Dudley-Smith, 9 Ashlands, Ford,
Salisbury, Wiltshire  SP4 6DY  England

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Augustine was born in North Africa in 354. His career as an orator and rhetorician led him from Carthage to Rome, and from there to Milan where the Imperial court at that time resided. By temperament, he was passionate and sensual, and as a young man he rejected Christianity. Gradually, however, under the influence first of Monica, his mother, and then of Ambrose, bishop of Milan, Augustine began to look afresh at the Scriptures. He was baptised by Ambrose at the Easter Vigil in 387. Not long after returning to North Africa he was ordained priest, and then became Bishop of Hippo. It is difficult to overestimate the influence of Augustine on the subsequent development of European thought. A huge body of his sermons and writings has been preserved, through all of which runs the theme of the sovereignty of the grace of God. He died in the year 430. 



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