OREMUS: 18 August 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Aug 17 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Tuesday, August 18, 2009
William Porcher DuBose, Priest, 1918

Lord, open our lips,
and our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, everloving Father,
your care extends beyond
the boundaries of race and nation,
to the hearts of all who live.
Your Spirit fills us with a living faith,
that we may receive your gift of mercy
and come to sit at the table of your heavenly banquet.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 
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Psalm 37:26-end

I have been young and now I am old,*
 but never have I seen the righteous forsaken,
   or their children begging bread.
The righteous are always generous in their lending,*
 and their children shall be a blessing.
Turn from evil and do good,*
 and dwell in the land for ever.
For the Lord loves justice;*
 he does not forsake his faithful ones.
They shall be kept safe for ever,*
 but the offspring of the wicked shall be destroyed.
The righteous shall possess the land*
 and dwell in it for ever.
The mouth of the righteous utters wisdom,*
 and their tongue speaks what is right.
The law of their God is in their heart,*
 and their footsteps shall not falter.
The wicked spy on the righteous*
 and seek occasion to kill them.
The Lord will not abandon them to their hand,*
 nor let them be found guilty when brought to trial.
Wait upon the Lord and keep his way;*
 he will raise you up to possess the land,
   and when the wicked are cut off, you will see it.
I have seen the wicked in their arrogance,*
 flourishing like a tree in full leaf.
I went by and, behold, they were not there;*
 I searched for them, but they could not be found.
Mark those who are honest; observe the upright;*
 for there is a future for the peaceable.
Transgressors shall be destroyed, one and all;*
 the future of the wicked is cut off.
But the deliverance of the righteous
   comes from the Lord;*
 he is their stronghold in time of trouble.
The Lord will help them and rescue them;*
 he will rescue them from the wicked and deliver them,
   because they seek refuge in him.

A Song of Peace (Isaiah 2.35)

Come, let us go up to the mountain of God,  
to the house of the God of Jacob; 
That God may teach us his ways,  
and that we may walk in his paths. 
For the law shall go out from Zion,  
and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. 
God shall judge between the nations,  
and shall mediate for many peoples. 
They shall beat their swords into ploughshares,  
and their spears into pruning hooks. 
Nation shall not lift up sword against nation,  
neither shall they learn war any more. 
O people of Jacob, come:  
let us walk in the light of the Lord. 

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Micah 4:9-5:1]:

Now why do you cry aloud?
   Is there no king in you?
Has your counsellor perished,
   that pangs have seized you like a woman in labour? 
Writhe and groan, O daughter Zion,
   like a woman in labour;
for now you shall go forth from the city
   and camp in the open country;
   you shall go to Babylon.
There you shall be rescued,
   there the Lord will redeem you
   from the hands of your enemies. 

Now many nations
   are assembled against you,
saying, ‘Let her be profaned,
   and let our eyes gaze upon Zion.’ 
But they do not know
   the thoughts of the Lord;
they do not understand his plan,
   that he has gathered them as sheaves to the threshing-floor. 
Arise and thresh,
   O daughter Zion,
for I will make your horn iron
   and your hoofs bronze;
you shall beat in pieces many peoples,
   and shall devote their gain to the Lord,
   their wealth to the Lord of the whole earth. 
Now you are walled around with a wall;
   siege is laid against us;
with a rod they strike the ruler of Israel
   upon the cheek. 

HYMN 
Words: Luise Hensel (1798-1876) tr Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)
Meter: 87 87

Ever find I joy in reading,
In the ancient holy book,
Of the gentle Teacher's pleading,
Truth in every word and look.

How, when children came, he blessed them,
Suffered no man to reprove:
Took them in his arms, and pressed them
To his heart with words of love.

How no contrite soul e'er sought him
And was bidden to depart;
How with gentle words he taught him,
Soothed and healed the broken heart.

Still I read the ancient story,
And my joy is ever new.
Lord, that I may share his glory,
Make me tender, loving, true!

SECOND READING [Luke 19:47-20:8]:

Every day he was teaching in the temple. The chief priests, the scribes, and the leaders of the people kept looking for a way to kill him; but they did not find anything they could do, for all the people were spellbound by what they heard. 

One day, as he was teaching the people in the temple and telling the good news, the chief priests and the scribes came with the elders and said to him, 'Tell us, by what authority are you doing these things? Who is it who gave you this authority?' He answered them, 'I will also ask you a question, and you tell me: Did the baptism of John come from heaven, or was it of human origin?' They discussed it with one another, saying, 'If we say, "From heaven", he will say, "Why did you not believe him?" But if we say, "Of human origin", all the people will stone us; for they are convinced that John was a prophet.' So they answered that they did not know where it came from. Then Jesus said to them, 'Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We seek you daily, O Father,
and you are there daily to be found.

Wherever we seek you,
at home, at work, on the highway,
you are there, O Lord.

Whatever we do,
eating and drinking,
writing or working,
readings, meditating or praying,
you are there, O Lord.

If we are oppressed,
you defend us, O Lord.

If we hunger,
you feed us, O Lord.

Whatever we need,
you give us, O Lord.

Faithful Defender,
do not let our hearts be troubled,
but fill us with such confidence and joy
that we may sleep in peace and rise in your light;
through Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.

Almighty God, 
you gave to your servant William Porcher DuBose 
special gifts of grace to understand the Scriptures 
and to teach the truth as it is in Christ Jesus: 
Grant that by this teaching we may know you, 
the one true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent; 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
		
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Grant us so fully to manifest Christ in our lives
that people of all races and creeds 
may be drawn to him who is their whole salvation, 
our Savior Jesus Christ.  Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is by Stephen Benner. The closing prayer is a sentence from
_Uniting in Worship_, The Uniting Church in Australia.

The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

William Porcher DuBose is a serious candidate for the title of "greatest
theologian that the Episcopal Church in the USA has produced." He was born
in South Carolina in 1836, and attended the Military College of South Carolina
(now the Citadel) in Charleston (32:48 N 79:58 W), and the University of
Virginia in Charlottesville (38:02 N 78:29 W). He served as a chaplain in the
Confederate Army, and after the War of 1861-1865 served as a parish priest.
In 1871 he became a professor at the University of the South (an Episcopal
institution) in Sewanee, Tennessee, became Dean of the School of Theology in
1894, retired in 1908, and died in 1918.
He was fluent in Greek, and well-read both in Greek philosophy and in the
early Christian fathers. Among his numerous books, the best known are The
Soteriology of The New Testament, The Gospel in The Gospels, and The
Reason of Life. (Soter is the Greek word for "Savior", and soteriology is the
branch of theology that deals with such questions as, "What does it mean to
say that Christ saves us?" "How does his death and resurrection do us any
good?" "How are the benefits of Christ's work applied to the individual?" and
so on.) A quote from one of his articles follows:
"God has placed forever before our eyes, not the image but the very Person of
the Spiritual Man. We have not to ascend into Heaven to bring Him down, nor
to descend into the abyss to bring Him up, for He is with us, and near us, and
in us. We have only to confess with our mouths that He is Lord, and believe in
our hearts that God has raised Him from the dead--and raised us in Him-- and
we shall live." [James Kiefer]



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