OREMUS: 23 April 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Apr 22 17:00:00 GMT 2009


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OREMUS for Thursday, April 23, 2009
George, Martyr, Patron of England, c.304

Alleluia! Christ is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed! Alleluia!

Blessed are you, eternal God;
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
in whom we receive the legacy of a living hope,
born again not only from his death
but also from his resurrection.
Day by day you refine our faith,
that we who have not seen the Christ
may truly confess him as our Lord and God,
and share the blessedness of those who believe.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/eastocan.html

Psalm 28

O Lord, I call to you;
   my rock, do not be deaf to my cry;*
 lest, if you do not hear me,
   I become like those who go down to the Pit.
Hear the voice of my prayer when I cry out to you,*
 when I lift up my hands to your holy of holies.
Do not snatch me away with the wicked
   or with the evildoers,*
 who speak peaceably with their neighbours,
   while strife is in their hearts.
Repay them according to their deeds,*
 and according to the wickedness of their actions.
According to the work of their hands repay them,*
 and give them their just deserts.
They have no understanding of the Lord's doings,
   nor of the works of his hands;*
 therefore he will break them down
   and not build them up.
Blessed is the Lord!*
 for he has heard the voice of my prayer.
The Lord is my strength and my shield;*
 my heart trusts in him and I have been helped;
Therefore my heart dances for joy,*
 and in my song will I praise him.
The Lord is the strength of his people,*
 a safe refuge for his anointed.
Save your people and bless your inheritance;*
 shepherd them and carry them for ever.

A Song of God's Grace (Ephesians 1.3-10) 

Blessed are you, 
the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,  
for you have blest us in Christ Jesus 
with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places. 
You chose us to be yours in Christ 
before the foundation of the world,  
that we should be holy and blameless before you. 
In love you destined us for adoption as your children, 
through Jesus Christ,  
according to the purpose of your will, 
To the praise of your glorious grace,  
which you freely bestowed on us in the Beloved. 
In you, we have redemption 
through the blood of Christ,  
the forgiveness of our sins, 
According to the riches of your grace,  
which you have lavished upon us. 
You have made known to us, in all wisdom and insight,  
the mystery of your will, 
According to your purpose 
which you set forth in Christ,  
as a plan for the fullness of time, 
To unite all things in Christ,  
things in heaven and things on earth.

Psalm 148

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord from the heavens;*
 praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you angels of his;*
 praise him, all his host.
Praise him, sun and moon;*
 praise him, all you shining stars.
Praise him, heaven of heavens,*
 and you waters above the heavens.
Let them praise the name of the Lord;*
 for he commanded and they were created.
He made them stand fast for ever and ever;*
 he gave them a law which shall not pass away.
Praise the Lord from the earth,*
 you sea-monsters and all deeps;
Fire and hail, snow and fog,*
 tempestuous wind, doing his will;
Mountains and all hills,*
 fruit trees and all cedars;
Wild beasts and all cattle,*
 creeping things and winged birds;
Kings of the earth and all peoples,*
 princes and all rulers of the world;
Young men and maidens,*
 old and young together.
Let them praise the name of the Lord,*
 for his name only is exalted,
   his splendour is over earth and heaven.
He has raised up strength for his people
   and praise for all his loyal servants,*
 the children of Israel, a people who are near him.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Exodus 15:20-end]:

Then the prophet Miriam, Aaron's sister, took a tambourine in her hand; and all the women went out after her with tambourines and with dancing. And Miriam sang to them:
'Sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously;
horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.' 

Then Moses ordered Israel to set out from the Red Sea, and they went into the wilderness of Shur. They went for three days in the wilderness and found no water. When they came to Marah, they could not drink the water of Marah because it was bitter. That is why it was called Marah. And the people complained against Moses, saying, 'What shall we drink?' He cried out to the Lord; and the Lord showed him a piece of wood; he threw it into the water, and the water became sweet.

There the Lord made for them a statute and an ordinance and there he put them to the test. He said, 'If you will listen carefully to the voice of the Lord your God, and do what is right in his sight, and give heed to his commandments and keep all his statutes, I will not bring upon you any of the diseases that I brought upon the Egyptians; for I am the Lord who heals you.' 

Then they came to Elim, where there were twelve springs of water and seventy palm trees; and they camped there by the water. 

HYMN 
Words: Edward Denny, 1842
Tune: Dunfermline

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l144.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.             

Light of the lonely pilgrim's heart,
Star of the coming day,
arise, and with thy morning beams
chase all our griefs away.

Come, blessed Lord, bid every shore
and answering island sing
the praises of thy royal Name,
and own thee as their King.

Bid the whole earth, responsive now
to the bright world above,
break forth in rapturous strains of joy
in memory of thy love.

Lord, Lord, thy fair creation groans,
the air, the earth, the sea,
in unison with all our hearts,
and calls aloud for thee.

Come, then, with all thy quickening power
with one awakening smile,
and bid the serpent's trail no more
thy beauteous realms defile.

Thine was the cross, with all its fruits,
of grace and peace divine;
be thine the crown of glory now,
the palm of victory thine.

SECOND READING [Hebrews 3]:

Therefore, brothers and sisters, holy partners in a heavenly calling, consider that Jesus, the apostle and high priest of our confession, was faithful to the one who appointed him, just as Moses also 'was faithful in all God's house.' Yet Jesus is worthy of more glory than Moses, just as the builder of a house has more honour than the house itself. (For every house is built by someone, but the builder of all things is God.) Now Moses was faithful in all God's house as a servant, to testify to the things that would be spoken later. Christ, however, was faithful over God's house as a son, and we are his house if we hold firm the confidence and the pride that belong to hope. 

Therefore, as the Holy Spirit says,
'Today, if you hear his voice, 
do not harden your hearts as in the rebellion, 
   as on the day of testing in the wilderness, 
where your ancestors put me to the test, 
   though they had seen my works for forty years. 
Therefore I was angry with that generation, 
and I said, “They always go astray in their hearts, 
   and they have not known my ways.” 
As in my anger I swore, 
   “They will not enter my rest.” ' 

Take care, brothers and sisters, that none of you may have an evil, unbelieving heart that turns away from the living God. But exhort one another every day, as long as it is called 'today', so that none of you may be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin. For we have become partners of Christ, if only we hold our first confidence firm to the end. As it is said,
'Today, if you hear his voice,
do not harden your hearts as in the rebellion.' 

Now who were they who heard and yet were rebellious? Was it not all those who left Egypt under the leadership of Moses? But with whom was he angry for forty years? Was it not those who sinned, whose bodies fell in the wilderness? And to whom did he swear that they would not enter his rest, if not to those who were disobedient? So we see that they were unable to enter because of unbelief. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
O Christ, in your resurrection,
the heavens and the earth rejoice:
Alleluia!

By your resurrection you broke open the gates of hell,
and destroyed sin and death.
Keep us victorious over sin.

By your resurrection you raised the dead,
and brought us from death to life.
Guide us in the way of eternal life.

By your resurrection you confounded your guards and executioners,
and filled the disciples with joy.
Give us joy in your service.

By your resurrection you proclaimed good news to the women and apostles,
and brought salvation to the whole world.
Direct our lives as your new creation.

By your resurrection you give new life to your people, the Church.

Send us out to do the work you have given us to do.

Blessed are you, strong Shepherd of your people.
You hear us when we lift up our hands in prayer,
and through your Son Jesus Christ
you give us the promise of an eternal inheritance.
Blessed are you for ever. Amen.

God our Redeemer,
whose Church was strengthened
by the blood of your martyr George:
so bind us, in life and death, to Christ's sacrifice
that our lives, broken and offered with his,
may carry his death and proclaim his resurrection in the world;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Rejoicing in the God's new creation,
let us pray as our Redeemer has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

May God, who through the resurrection
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
has given us the victory,
give us joy and peace in our faith. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses one sentence from _Revised
Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on
Common Texts and another sentence from _Opening Prayers: Collects in
Contemporary Language_.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

George is a soldier and martyr who suffered around 303 at Lydda (Diospolis)
in Palestine. The earliest surviving record of him is a church inscription in
Syria, dated about 346. Commemorations of him are numerous, early, and
widespread. However, no details of his life are known. In 495 his name appears
on a list of "good men, justly remembered, whose good deeds are known only
to God." The best-known story about him is that he rescued a beautiful
princess in Libya by killing a dragon. It should be noted that this story is
unknown before the appearance in 1265 of a romance called the Golden
Legend (Legendum Aureum), translated into English in 1483.
When the soldiers of the First Crusade were besieging Antioch in 1098, they
had a vision of George and Demetrius (a deacon of Sirmium in Serbia,
martyred under Maximian, and referred to as a "soldier of Christ," from which
he was often understood to be a literal soldier) encouraging them to maintain
the siege, which ultimately proved successful. Richard I ("the Lion-Heart") of
England, who fought in the Holy Land in 1191-1192, placed himself and his
army under George's protection, and with the return home of the Crusaders,
the popularity of George in England increased greatly. Edward III founded the
Order of the Garter in 1348 under his patronage, his banner (a red cross on a
white field) began to be used as the English national flag in 1284, and in 1415
Henry V spoke of him to rally the troops before the battle of Agincourt ("Once
more unto the breach, dear friends, once more, or close the wall up with our
English dead!"), and in the years following George was regarded as the special
patron of England, of soldiers, and of the Boy Scouts, as well as of Venice,
Genoa, Portugal, and Catalonia. He is also remembered with enthusiasm in
many parts of the East Orthodox Church. He is a principal character in
Edmund Spenser's allegorical poem The Faerie Queene, written in the late
1500's. [James Kiefer]



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