OREMUS: 21 April 2009

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Apr 20 17:00:01 GMT 2009


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org for more resources, a link to our store in association with Amazon and other opportunities to support this ministry. This ministry can only continue with your support.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Tuesday, April 21, 2009
Anselm, Abbot of Le Bec, Archbishop of Canterbury, Teacher of the Faith, 1109

Alleluia! Christ is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed! Alleluia!

Blessed are you, eternal God;
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
in whom we receive the legacy of a living hope,
born again not only from his death
but also from his resurrection.
Day by day you refine our faith,
that we who have not seen the Christ
may truly confess him as our Lord and God,
and share the blessedness of those who believe.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/eastocan.html

Psalm 5

Give ear to my words, O Lord;*
 consider my meditation.
Hearken to my cry for help, my King and my God,*
 for I make my prayer to you.
In the morning, Lord, you hear my voice;*
 early in the morning I make my appeal
   and watch for you.
For you are not a God who takes pleasure in wickedness*
 and evil cannot dwell with you.
Braggarts cannot stand in your sight;*
 you hate all those who work wickedness.
You destroy those who speak lies;*
 the bloodthirsty and deceitful, O Lord, you abhor.
But as for me, through the greatness of your mercy,
   I will go into your house;*
 I will bow down towards your holy temple in awe of you.
Lead me, O Lord, in your righteousness,
   because of those who lie in wait for me;*
 make your way straight before me.
For there is no truth in their mouth;*
 there is destruction in their heart;
Their throat is an open grave;*
 they flatter with their tongue.
Declare them guilty, O God;*
 let them fall, because of their schemes.
Because of their many transgressions cast them out,*
 for they have rebelled against you.
But all who take refuge in you will be glad;*
 they will sing out their joy for ever.
You will shelter them,*
 so that those who love your name may exult in you.
For you, O Lord, will bless the righteous;*
 you will defend them with your favour as with a shield.

A Song of Faith (1 Peter 1.3-5,18,19,21)

Blessed be the God and Father  
of our Lord Jesus Christ! 
By his great mercy we have been born anew to a living hope  
through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, 
Into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled and unfading,  
kept in heaven for you, 
Who are being protected by the power of God through faith,  
for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. 
You were ransomed from the futile ways of your ancestors  
not with perishable things like silver or gold 
But with the precious blood of Christ  
like that of a lamb without spot or stain. 
Through him you have confidence in God, 
who raised him from the dead and gave him glory,  
so that your faith and hope are set on God.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Exodus 13:17-14:2]:

When Pharaoh let the people go, God did not lead them by way of the land of the Philistines, although that was nearer; for God thought, 'If the people face war, they may change their minds and return to Egypt.' So God led the people by the roundabout way of the wilderness towards the Red Sea. The Israelites went up out of the land of Egypt prepared for battle. And Moses took with him the bones of Joseph, who had required a solemn oath of the Israelites, saying, 'God will surely take notice of you, and then you must carry my bones with you from here.' They set out from Succoth, and camped at Etham, on the edge of the wilderness. The Lord went in front of them in a pillar of cloud by day, to lead them along the way, and in a pillar of fire by night, to give them light, so that they might travel by day and by night. Neither the pillar of cloud by day nor the pillar of fire by night left its place in front of the people. 

Then the Lord said to Moses: 'Tell the Israelites to turn back and camp in front of Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, in front of Baal-zephon; you shall camp opposite it, by the sea. 

HYMN 
Words: John N Darby (1800-1882)
Tune: Old 124th

And is it so? I shall be like Thy Son!
Is this the grace which He for me has won?
Father of glory, thought beyond all thought,
In glory, to His own blest likeness brought;

Oh, Jesus, Lord, who loved me like to Thee?
Fruit of Thy work, with Thee, too, there to see
Thy glory, Lord, while endless ages roll,
Myself the prize and travail of Thy soul.

Yet it must be, Thy love had not its rest
Were Thy redeemed not with Thee fully blest;
That love that gives not as the world, but shares
All it possesses with its loved co-heirs.

Nor I alone, Thy loved ones all, complete
In glory round Thee there with joy shall meet,
All like Thee, for Thy glory like Thee, Lord,
Object supreme of all, by all adored.

SECOND READING [Hebrews 2:1-8]:

Therefore we must pay greater attention to what we have heard, so that we do not drift away from it. For if the message declared through angels was valid, and every transgression or disobedience received a just penalty, how can we escape if we neglect so great a salvation? It was declared at first through the Lord, and it was attested to us by those who heard him, while God added his testimony by signs and wonders and various miracles, and by gifts of the Holy Spirit, distributed according to his will. 

Now God did not subject the coming world, about which we are speaking, to angels. But someone has testified somewhere,
'What are human beings that you are mindful of them, 
   or mortals, that you care for them? 
You have made them for a little while lower than the angels; 
   you have crowned them with glory and honour, 
   subjecting all things under their feet.'

Now in subjecting all things to them, God left nothing outside their control. As it is, we do not yet see everything in subjection to them, 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
On this day that the Lord has made, let us give God the glory
and pray for the people he has redeemed.

That we may live as those who believe
in the triumph of the cross: 
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That all people may receive the good news of his victory: 
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That those born to new life in the waters of baptism
may know the power of his resurrection:
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That those who suffer pain and anguish may find healing and peace
in the wounds of Christ:
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That in the undying love of Christ,
we may have union with all who have died:
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Let us join our voices with the saints in proclaiming
that Christ has given us the victory:

Jesus, as a mother you gather your people to you:
  You are gentle with us as a mother with her children;
Often you weep over our sins and our pride:
  tenderly you draw us from hatred and judgement.
You comfort us in sorrow and bind up our wounds:
  in sickness you nurse us,
  and with pure milk you feed us.
Jesus, by your dying we are born to new life:
  by your anguish and labour we come forth in joy.
Despair turns to hope through your sweet goodness:
  through your gentleness we find comfort in fear.
Your warmth gives life to the dead:
  your touch makes sinners righteous.
Lord Jesus, in your mercy heal us:
  in your love and tenderness remake us.
In your compassion bring grace and forgiveness:
  for the beauty of heaven may your love prepare us. Amen.

O God, 
who raised up your servant Anselm 
to be a guide and teacher of faith
in its quest for understanding,
provide your Church in every age
with godliness and sound learning, 
that we may have power to speak 
the reason for the hope that is in us;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

		
Rejoicing in the God's new creation,
let us pray as our Redeemer has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

May God, who through the resurrection
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
has given us the victory,
give us joy and peace in our faith. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses one sentence from _Revised
Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on
Common Texts and another sentence from _Opening Prayers: Collects in
Contemporary Language_.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The first collect is by St. Anselm.
The closing sentence is from a prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in
Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

Anselm is the most important Christian theologian in the West between Augustine and Thomas Aquinas. His two great accomplishments are his Proslogium (in which he undertakes to show that Reason requires that men should believe in God), and his Cur Deus Homo? (in which he undertakes to show that Divine Love responding to human rebelliousness requires that God should become a man).
He was born in Italy about 1033, and in 1060 he entered the monastery of Bec in
Normandy to study under Stephen Lanfranc, whom he succeeded in office, first as prior of Bec, and later as Archbishop of Canterbury.
In 1078 he was elected abbot of Bec. The previous year, he completed a work called the Monologium, in which he argues for the existence of God from the existence of degrees of perfection (Aquinas's Fourth Way is a variation of this argument).
In 1087, while still at Bec, he produced his Proslogium, an outline of his "ontological
argument" for the existence of God. Taking as his text the opening of Psalm 14 ("The fool hath said in his heart: There is no God."), Anselm undertakes to show that the fool is contradicting himself -- that the concept of God is unique in that anyone who understands what is meant by the question, "Does God exist?" will see that the answer must be "Yes."

King William II of England had no fondness for the Church, and at the death of Lanfranc he kept the See of Canterbury vacant until he was gravely ill, whereon he promised to let Anselm be made Archbishop. Anselm was made Archbishop (4 December 1093), the King recovered, and the two began to dispute the extent of the King's right to intervene in Church matters. Anselm went into exile in 1097 and remained in Italy for three years until the King died in 1100.
During that time Anselm was instrumental in settling the doubts of the Greek bishops of southern Italy about the doctrine of the Filioque.
He also devoted the time to writing a book known as Cur Deus Homo? (meaning "Why Did God Become Man?"). In it he puts forward the "satisfaction theory" of the
Atonement. Man's offence of rebellion against God is one that demands a payment or
satisfaction. Fallen man is incapable of making adequate satisfaction, and so God took
human nature upon Him, in order that a perfect man might make perfect satisfaction and so restore the human race. The success of his work may be gauged by the fact that many Christians today not only accept his way of explaining the Atonement, but are simply unaware that there is any other way.
After the death of King William II in 1100, Anselm returned to England at the invitation of the new king Henry I, only to quarrel with Henry about the lawful extent of the king's control over the selection of bishops and abbots (it must be remembered that these officials had civil as well as religious authority). Anselm was again in exile from 1103 to 1106. In 1107 a compromise was reached, and Anselm returned home to Canterbury, where he lived his last few years in peace, dying 21 April 1109. [James Kiefer, abridged]


More information about the oremus mailing list