OREMUS: 20 September 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Sep 19 17:00:01 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Saturday, September 20, 2008
John Coleridge Patteson, First Bishop of Melanesia,
and his Companions, Martyrs, 1871

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
in Christ the walls that divide are broken down,
the chains that enslave are thrown aside,
and we are freed from death and despair
to life and hope,
liberated from hate and war
and empowered to love and seek peace.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 145

I will exalt you, O God my King,*
 and bless your name for ever and ever.
Every day will I bless you*
 and praise your name for ever and ever.
Great is the Lord and greatly to be praised;*
 there is no end to his greatness.
One generation shall praise your works to another*
 and shall declare your power.
I will ponder the glorious splendour of your majesty*
 and all your marvellous works.
They shall speak of the might of your wondrous acts,*
 and I will tell of your greatness.
They shall publish the remembrance
   of your great goodness;*
 they shall sing of your righteous deeds.
The Lord is gracious and full of compassion,*
 slow to anger and of great kindness.
The Lord is loving to everyone*
 and his compassion is over all his works.
All your works praise you, O Lord,*
 and your faithful servants bless you.
They make known the glory of your kingdom*
 and speak of your power;
That the peoples may know of your power*
 and the glorious splendour of your kingdom.
Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom;*
 your dominion endures throughout all ages.
The Lord is faithful in all his words*
 and merciful in all his deeds.
The Lord upholds all those who fall;*
 he lifts up those who are bowed down.
The eyes of all wait upon you, O Lord,*
 and you give them their food in due season.
You open wide your hand*
 and satisfy the needs of every living creature.
The Lord is righteous in all his ways*
 and loving in all his works.
The Lord is near to those who call upon him,*
 to all who call upon him faithfully.
He fulfils the desire of those who fear him,*
 he hears their cry and helps them.
The Lord preserves all those who love him,*
 but he destroys all the wicked.
My mouth shall speak the praise of the Lord;*
 let all flesh bless his holy name for ever and ever.

A Song of God's Love (1 John 4.7-11,12b)

Beloved, let us love one another, 
for love is of God;  
everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. 
Whoever does not love does not know God,  
for God is love. 
In this the love of God was revealed among us,  
that God sent his only Son into the world, 
so that we might live through him. 
In this is love, 
not that we loved God but that he loved us,  
and sent his Son to be the expiation for our sins. 
Beloved, since God loved us so much,  
we ought also to love one another. 
For if we love one another, God abides in us,  
and God's love will be perfected in us.  

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 12:1-10]:

Then Job answered:
'No doubt you are the people,
   and wisdom will die with you.
But I have understanding as well as you;
   I am not inferior to you.
   Who does not know such things as these?
I am a laughing-stock to my friends;
   I, who called upon God and he answered me,
   a just and blameless man, I am a laughing-stock.
Those at ease have contempt for misfortune,
   but it is ready for those whose feet are unstable.
The tents of robbers are at peace,
   and those who provoke God are secure,
   who bring their god in their hands.

'But ask the animals, and they will teach you;
   the birds of the air, and they will tell you;
ask the plants of the earth, and they will teach you;
   and the fish of the sea will declare to you.
Who among all these does not know
   that the hand of the Lord has done this?
In his hand is the life of every living thing
   and the breath of every human being.' 

HYMN 
Words: Isaac Watts, 1714 
Tune: Monmouth, Old 113th

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/i/i209.html
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I'll praise my Maker while I've breath,
and when my voice is lost in death,
praise shall employ my nobler powers;
my days of praise shall ne'er be past,
while life, and thought, and being last,
or immortality endures.

Why should I make a man my trust?
Princes must die and turn to dust;
vain is the help of flesh and blood:
their breath departs, their pomp, and power,
and thoughts, all vanish in an hour,
nor can they make their promise good.

Happy the man whose hopes rely
on Israel's God: he made the sky,
and earth, and seas, with all their train;
his truth for ever stands secure,
he saves th'oppressed, he feeds the poor,
and none shall find his promise vain.

The Lord has eyes to give the blind;
the Lord supports the sinking mind;
he sends the laboring conscience peace;
he helps the stranger in distress,
the widow, and the fatherless,
and grants the prisoner sweet release.

He loves his saints, he knows them well,
but turns the wicked down to hell;
thy God, O Zion! ever reigns:
Let every tongue, let every age,
in this exalted work engage;
praise him in everlasting strains.

I'll praise him while he lends me breath,
and when my voice is lost in death,
praise shall employ my nobler powers;
my days of praise shall ne'er be past,
while life, and thought, and being last,
or immortality endures. 
                                     
SECOND READING [Matthew 13:31-35, 44-52]:

Jesus put before them another parable: 'The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed
that someone took and sowed in his field; it is the smallest of all the seeds, but when it
has grown it is the greatest of shrubs and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air
come and make nests in its branches.'

He told them another parable: 'The kingdom of heaven is like yeast that a woman took
and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.'

Jesus told the crowds all these things in parables; without a parable he told them
nothing. This was to fulfil what had been spoken through the prophet:
'I will open my mouth to speak in parables;
   I will proclaim what has been hidden from the foundation of the world.'

'The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and
hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.

'Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding
one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

'Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a net that was thrown into the sea and caught
fish of every kind; when it was full, they drew it ashore, sat down, and put the good
into baskets but threw out the bad. So it will be at the end of the age. The angels will
come out and separate the evil from the righteous and throw them into the furnace of
fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

'Have you understood all this?' They answered, 'Yes.' And he said to them,
'Therefore every scribe who has been trained for the kingdom of heaven is like the
master of a household who brings out of his treasure what is new and what is old.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
In your glory, Lord, protect us by the power of your name:
that we may be one as you are one.

We are in the world but not of it:
protect us from the evil one.

Give us your word and the full measure of your joy:
sanctify us by your truth.

May your Spirit unite us in the love and glory of Father and Son;
we pray especially for your Church in the Diocese of
may we be one that the world may believe.

As you sent your Son into the world:
so send us, to make your glory known.

Lord God, King of the Universe,
you show the bright glory of your reign
in acts of mercy and enduring love:
raise the spirits of the downcast
and restore those who have fallen away,
that your Church may continually sing of your saving help;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

God of all tribes and peoples and tongues,
who called your servant John Coleridge Patteson
to witness in life and death to the gospel of Christ
amongst the peoples of Melanesia:
grant us to hear your call to service
and to respond trustfully and joyfully
to Jesus Christ our Redeemer,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen. 

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Let your peace, O God,
fill our hearts, our world, our universe. Amen.

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The psalms and first collect are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_
(Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer uses phrases from a hymn by Walter Farquahrson and a prayer by
Satish Kumar. The closing prayer uses a sentence from the same prayer by Kumar. 

The intercession is from _Patterns for Worship_, material from which is
included in this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 1995.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

John Coleridge Patteson was born in London in 1827. He attended Balliol
College, Oxford, and graduated in 1849. After a tour of Europe and a study of
languages, he became a fellow of Merton College, Oxford, in 1852. In 1855,
he heard Bishop George Selwyn of New Zealand (11 Apr) call for volunteers
to go the South Pacific to preach the Gospel. He went there, and founded a
school for the education of native Christian workers. He was adept at
languages, and learned twenty-three of the languages spoken in the Polynesian
and Melanesian Islands of the South Pacific. In 1861 he was consecrated
Bishop of Melanesia.
The slave-trade was technically illegal in the South Pacific at that time, but the
laws were only laxly enforced and in fact slave-raiding was a flourishing
business. Patteson was actively engaged in the effort to stamp it out. However,
injured men do not always distinguish friends from foes. After slave-raiders had
attacked the island of Nakapu, in the Santa Cruz group, Patteson and several
companions visited the area. They were assumed to be connected with the
raiders, and Patteson's body was floated back to his ship with five hatchet
wounds in the chest, one for each native who had been killed in the earlier raid.
The death of Bishop Patteson caused an uproar back in England, and
stimulated the government there to take firm measures to stamp out slavery
and the slave trade in its Pacific territories. It was also the seed of a strong and
vigorous Church in Melanesia today. Patteson and his companions died on 20
September 1871.



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