OREMUS: 6 October 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Oct 5 17:00:00 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Monday, October 6, 2008
William Tyndale, Translator of the Scriptures, Martyr, 1536

Let all the earth acclaim God,
sing to the glory of God's name.
Come and see what God has done,
let the sound of praise be heard. Amen.

Blessed is your glorious name,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
worthy of praise from every mouth,
of confession from every tongue,
of worship from every creature.
You created the world in your grace,
and by your compassion you redeemed it.
Heaven and earth are full of your praises:
Glory be to you, O God most high!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 131

O Lord, I am not proud;*
 I have no haughty looks.
I do not occupy myself with great matters,*
 or with things that are too hard for me.
But I still my soul and make it quiet,
   like a child upon its mother's breast;*
 my soul is quieted within me.
O Israel, wait upon the Lord,*
 from this time forth for evermore.

Psalm 133

O how good and pleasant it is,*
 when a family lives together in unity!
It is like fine oil upon the head*
 that runs down upon the beard,
Upon the beard of Aaron,*
 and runs down upon the collar of his robe.
It is like the dew of Hermon*
 that falls upon the hills of Zion.
For there the Lord has ordained the blessing:*
 life for evermore.

Psalm 134

Behold now, bless the Lord,
   all you servants of the Lord,*
 you that stand by night in the house of the Lord.
Lift up your hands in the holy place
   and bless the Lord;*
 the Lord who made heaven and earth
   bless you out of Zion.

A Song of Ezekiel (Ezekiel 36.24-26,28b)

I will take you from the nations,  
and gather you from all the countries. 
I will sprinkle clean water upon you,  
and you shall be clean from all your uncleannesses. 
A new heart I will give you,  
and put a new spirit within you, 
And I will remove from your body the heart of stone  
and give you a heart of flesh. 
You shall be my people,  
and I will be your God.

Psalm 146

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord, O my soul!*
 I will praise the Lord as long as I live;
   I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.
Put not your trust in rulers,
   nor in any child of earth,*
 for there is no help in them.
When they breathe their last, they return to earth,*
 and in that day their thoughts perish.
Happy are they who have the God of Jacob
   for their help!*
 whose hope is in the Lord their God;
Who made heaven and earth, the seas,
   and all that is in them;*
 who keeps his promise for ever;
Who gives justice to those who are oppressed,*
 and food to those who hunger.
The Lord sets the prisoners free;
   the Lord opens the eyes of the blind;*
 the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down;
The Lord loves the righteous;
   the Lord cares for the stranger;*
 he sustains the orphan and widow,
   but frustrates the way of the wicked.
The Lord shall reign for ever,*
 your God, O Zion, throughout all generations.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Ecclesiastes 1:2-11]:

Vanity of vanities, says the Teacher,
   vanity of vanities! All is vanity.
What do people gain from all the toil
   at which they toil under the sun?
A generation goes, and a generation comes,
   but the earth remains for ever.
The sun rises and the sun goes down,
   and hurries to the place where it rises.
The wind blows to the south,
   and goes round to the north;
round and round goes the wind,
   and on its circuits the wind returns.
All streams run to the sea,
   but the sea is not full;
to the place where the streams flow,
   there they continue to flow.
All things are wearisome;
   more than one can express;
the eye is not satisfied with seeing,
   or the ear filled with hearing.
What has been is what will be,
   and what has been done is what will be done;
   there is nothing new under the sun.
Is there a thing of which it is said,
   'See, this is new'?
It has already been,
   in the ages before us.
The people of long ago are not remembered,
   nor will there be any remembrance
of people yet to come
   by those who come after them. 

HYMN 
Words: Henry Williams Baker, 1861
Tune: Ravenshaw

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l464.html
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Lord, thy Word abideth,
and our footsteps guideth;
who its truth believeth
light and joy receiveth.

When our foes are near us,
then thy Word doth cheer us,
Word of consolation,
message of salvation.

When the storms are o'er us,
and dark clouds before us,
then its light directeth,
and our way protecteth.

Who can tell the pleasure,
who recount the treasure,
by thy Word imparted
to the simple-hearted?

Word of mercy, giving
succor to the living;
word of life, supplying
comfort to the dying!

O that we, discerning,
its most holy learning,
Lord, may love and fear thee,
evermore be near thee!

SECOND READING [Matthew 19:16-end]:

Then someone came to Jesus and said, 'Teacher, what good deed must I do to have
eternal life?' And he said to him, 'Why do you ask me about what is good? There is
only one who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.' He said
to him, 'Which ones?' And Jesus said, 'You shall not murder; You shall not commit
adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; Honour your father and
mother; also, You shall love your neighbour as yourself.' The young man said to him,
'I have kept all these; what do I still lack?' Jesus said to him, 'If you wish to be
perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have
treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.' When the young man heard this word, he
went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

Then Jesus said to his disciples, 'Truly I tell you, it will be hard for a rich person to
enter the kingdom of heaven. Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the
eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.' When the
disciples heard this, they were greatly astounded and said, 'Then who can be saved?'
But Jesus looked at them and said, 'For mortals it is impossible, but for God all things
are possible.'

Then Peter said in reply, 'Look, we have left everything and followed you. What then
will we have?' Jesus said to them, 'Truly I tell you, at the renewal of all things, when
the Son of Man is seated on the throne of his glory, you who have followed me will
also sit on twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel. And everyone who has
left houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or fields, for my
name's sake, will receive a hundredfold, and will inherit eternal life. But many who are
first will be last, and the last will be first.'

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Holy God,
we rejoice in the martyrs and prophets, teachers and leaders,
and all the ordinary and extraordinary believers
who have lived and loved the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ.
For their witness and encouragement,
We thank you, Lord.

Recalling their stories and deeds,
we dare to take up our crosses.
For their witness and encouragement,
We thank you, Lord.

Surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses,
we plead for the human family and all creation:

For those addicted or tormented:
We pray to you, Lord.

For the victims of terrorism and disaster:
We pray to you, Lord.

For those who despair of life's goodness:
We pray to you, Lord.

For the Church, especially ecumenical councils and church agencies:
We pray to you, Lord.

For a resolution to unresolved matters of this day:
We pray to you, Lord.

Eternal God,
like a mother you calm and quieten our souls:
keep us humble as we see your wonder
and trusting as we live in your love;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Lord, give to your people grace to hear and keep your word
that, after the example of your servant William Tyndale,
we may not only profess your gospel
but also be ready to suffer and die for it,
to the honour of your name;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

While the patterns of daily life hold unchanged,
May the presence of Christ transfigure them;
When the patterns of life are torn and disrupted,
May the life of Christ mend and heal them,
Where the patterns of daily life, once shattered, are remade,
May the resurrection of Christ be glimpsed
In and through them.  Amen.

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The psalms and first collect are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_
(Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is adapted from Common Order, (c) 1994 The Church of
Scotland. The closing prayer comes from the Church of Scotland website.

The intercession is reprinted from _THE DAILY OFFICE: A Book of Hours of
Daily Prayer after the Use of the Order of Saint Luke_, (c) 1997 by The Order
of Saint Luke. Used by permission.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

William Tyndale was born about 1495 at Slymbridge near the Welsh border.
He received his degrees from Magdalen College, Oxford, and also studied at
Cambridge. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1521, and soon began to
speak of his desire, which eventually became his life's obsession, to translate
the Scriptures into English. It is reported that, in the course of a dispute with a
promminent clergyman who disparaged this proposal, he said, "If God spare
my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plow to know more
of the Scriptures than thou dost." The remainder of his life was devoted to
keeping that vow, or boast. Finding that the King, Henry VIII, was firmly set
against any English version of the Scriptures, he fled to Germany (visiting
Martin Luther in 1525), and there travelled from city to city, in exile, poverty,
persecution, and constant danger. Tyndale understood the commonly received
doctrine -- the popular theology -- of his time to imply that men earn their
salvation by good behavior and by penance. He wrote eloquently in favor of
the view that salvation is a gift of God, freely bestowed, and not a response to
any good act on the part of the receiver. His views are expressed in numerous
pamphlets, and in the introductions to and commentaries on various books of
the Bible that accompanied his translations. He completed his translation of the
New Testament in 1525, and it was printed at Worms and smuggled into
England. Of 18,000 copies, only two survive. In 1534, he produced a revised
version, and began work on the Old Testament. In the next two years he
completed and published the Pentateuch and Jonah, and translated the books
from Joshua through Second Chronicles, but then he was captured (betrayed
by one he had befriended), tried for heresy, and put to death. He was burned at
the stake, but, as was often done, the officer strangled him before lighting the
fire. His last words were, "Lord, open the King of England's eyes."
Miles Coverdale continued Tyndale's work by translating those portions of the
Bible (including the Apocrypha) which Tyndale had not lived to translate
himself, and publishing the complete work. In 1537, the "Matthew Bible"
(essentially the Tyndale-Coverdale Bible under another man's name to spare
the government embarrassment) was published in England with the Royal
Permission. Six copies were set up for public reading in Old St. Paul's Church,
and throughout the daylight hours the church was crowded with those who had
come to hear it. One man would stand at the lectern and read until his voice
gave out, and then he would stand down and another would take his place. All
English translations of the Bible from that time to the present century are
essentially revisions of the Tyndale-Coverdale work. [James Kiefer,
abridged]


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