OREMUS: 22 March 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Mar 21 17:00:01 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Saturday, March 22, 2008
Holy Saturday
(for use before the Vigil)

Silent prayer

Psalm 88

O Lord, my God, my Saviour,*
 by day and night I cry to you.
Let my prayer enter into your presence;*
 incline your ear to my lamentation.
For I am full of trouble;*
 my life is at the brink of the grave.
I am counted among those who go down to the Pit;*
 I have become like one who has no strength;
Lost among the dead,*
 like the slain who lie in the grave,
Whom you remember no more,*
 for they are cut off from your hand.
You have laid me in the depths of the Pit,*
 in dark places and in the abyss.
Your anger weighs upon me heavily,*
 and all your great waves overwhelm me.
You have put my friends far from me;
   you have made me to be abhorred by them;*
 I am in prison and cannot get free.
My sight has failed me because of trouble;*
 Lord, I have called upon you daily;
   I have stretched out my hands to you.
Do you work wonders for the dead?*
 will those who have died
   stand up and give you thanks?
Will your loving-kindness be declared in the grave?*
 your faithfulness in the land of destruction?
Will your wonders be known in the dark?*
 or your righteousness in the country
   where all is forgotten?
But as for me, O Lord, I cry to you for help;*
 in the morning my prayer comes before you.
Lord, why have you rejected me?*
 why have you hidden your face from me?
Ever since my youth,
   I have been wretched and at the point of death;*
 I have borne your terrors with a troubled mind.
Your blazing anger has swept over me;*
 your terrors have destroyed me;
They surround me all day long like a flood;*
 they encompass me on every side.
My friend and my neighbour you have put away from me,*
 and darkness is my only companion.

READING [Hosea 6:1-6]:

'Come, let us return to the Lord;
   for it is he who has torn, and he will heal us;
   he has struck down, and he will bind us up.
After two days he will revive us;
   on the third day he will raise us up,
   that we may live before him.
Let us know, let us press on to know the Lord;
   his appearing is as sure as the dawn;
he will come to us like the showers,
   like the spring rains that water the earth.'
What shall I do with you, O Ephraim?
   What shall I do with you, O Judah?
Your love is like a morning cloud,
   like the dew that goes away early.
Therefore I have hewn them by the prophets,
   I have killed them by the words of my mouth,
   and my judgement goes forth as the light.
For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice,
   the knowledge of God rather than burnt-offerings. 

HYMN 
Words: Thomas Whytehead, 1842
Tune: Redhead
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Resting from his work today
in the tomb the Savior lay;
still he slept, from head to feet
shrouded in the winding-sheet,
lying in the rock alone,
hidden by the sealed stone.

Late at even there was seen
watching long the Magdalene;
early, ere the break of day,
sorrowful she took her way
to the holy garden glade,
where her buried Lord was laid.

So with thee, till life shall end,
I would solemn vigil spend;
let me hew thee, Lord, a shrine
in this rocky heart of mine,
where in pure embalmed cell
none but thou may ever dwell.

Myrrh and spices will I bring,
true affection's offering;
close the door from sight and sound
of the busy world around;
and in patient watch remain
till my Lord appear again. 

SECOND READING [John 2:18-22]:

The Jews then said to Jesus, 'What sign can you show us for doing this?' Jesus answered them,
'Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.' The Jews then said, 'This temple has
been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?' But he was
speaking of the temple of his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered
that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.

The Benedictus (Morning),
the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may
follow.

Prayer:
In the midst of life we are in death;
from whom can we seek help?
>From you alone, O Lord,
who by our sins are justly angered.

Holy God, Holy and Mighty,
Holy and merciful Savior,
deliver us not into the bitterness of eternal death.

Lord, you know the secrets of our hearts;
shut not your ears to our prayers,
but spare us, O Lord.

Holy God, Holy and Mighty,
Holy and merciful Savior,
deliver us not into the bitterness of eternal death.

O worthy and eternal Judge,
do not let the pains of death
turn us away from you at our last hour.

Holy God, Holy and Mighty,
Holy and merciful Savior,
deliver us not into the bitterness of eternal death.

O God, we carry in our own bodies
the death of the Lord Jesus,
that likewise we might manifest his life:
let not our spiritual foe prevail against us,
but with the morning light
raise us up from the sleep of sin and death;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Standing at the foot of the cross,
we pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Christ Jesus humbled himself for us,
and in obedience accepted death,
even death on a cross.
Therefore God has raised him to the heights
and given him the name
which is above all other names.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer (adapted) are from
_Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_, copyright
(c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The intercession is from The Book of Common Prayer According to the
Use of The Episcopal Church_.



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