OREMUS: 20 March 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Mar 19 17:00:03 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Thursday, March 20, 2008
Maundy Thursday

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, almighty God,
for your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.
For he gave us a new commandment
that we should love one another as he has loved us.
Knowing that his hour had come,
in his great love he gave us the holy mysteries
of his Body and Blood,
that we, redeemed by his death
and restored to life by his resurrection,
might be partakers of his divine nature.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/passocan.html

Psalm 42

As the deer longs for the water-brooks,*
 so longs my soul for you, O God.
My soul is athirst for God, athirst for the living God;*
 when shall I come to appear before the presence of God?
My tears have been my food day and night,*
 while all day long they say to me,
   'Where now is your God?'
I pour out my soul when I think on these things:*
 how I went with the multitude
   and led them into the house of God,
With the voice of praise and thanksgiving,*
 among those who keep holy-day.
Why are you so full of heaviness, O my soul?*
 and why are you so disquieted within me?
Put your trust in God;*
 for I will yet give thanks to him,
   who is the help of my countenance, and my God.
My soul is heavy within me;*
 therefore I will remember you from the land of Jordan,
   and from the peak of Mizar among the heights of Hermon.
One deep calls to another in the noise of your cataracts;*
 all your rapids and floods have gone over me.
The Lord grants his loving-kindness in the daytime;*
 in the night season his song is with me,
   a prayer to the God of my life.
I will say to the God of my strength,
   'Why have you forgotten me?*
 and why do I go so heavily
   while the enemy oppresses me?'
While my bones are being broken,*
 my enemies mock me to my face;
All day long they mock me*
 say to me, 'Where now is your God?'
Why are you so full of heaviness, O my soul?*
 and why are you so disquieted within me?
Put your trust in God;*
 for I will yet give thanks to him,
   who is the help of my countenance, and my God.

Psalm 43

Give judgement for me, O God,
   and defend my cause against an ungodly people;*
 deliver me from the deceitful and the wicked.
For you are the God of my strength;
   why have you put me from you?*
 and why do I go so heavily
   while the enemy oppresses me?
Send out your light and your truth,
   that they may lead me,*
 and bring me to your holy hill
   and to your dwelling;
That I may go to the altar of God,
   to the God of my joy and gladness;*
 and on the harp I will give thanks to you,
   O God my God.
Why are you so full of heaviness, O my soul?*
 and why are you so disquieted within me?
Put your trust in God;*
 for I will yet give thanks to him,
   who is the help of my countenance, and my God.

READING [Leviticus 16:2-24]:

The Lord said to Moses:
Tell your brother Aaron not to come just at any time into the sanctuary inside the curtain before
the mercy-seat that is upon the ark, or he will die; for I appear in the cloud upon the mercy-seat.
Thus shall Aaron come into the holy place: with a young bull for a sin-offering and a ram for a
burnt-offering. He shall put on the holy linen tunic, and shall have the linen undergarments next to
his body, fasten the linen sash, and wear the linen turban; these are the holy vestments. He shall
bathe his body in water, and then put them on. He shall take from the congregation of the people
of Israel two male goats for a sin-offering, and one ram for a burnt-offering.
Aaron shall offer the bull as a sin-offering for himself, and shall make atonement for himself and
for his house. He shall take the two goats and set them before the Lord at the entrance of the tent
of meeting; and Aaron shall cast lots on the two goats, one lot for the Lord and the other lot for
Azazel. Aaron shall present the goat on which the lot fell for the Lord, and offer it as a
sin-offering; but the goat on which the lot fell for Azazel shall be presented alive before the Lord
to make atonement over it, so that it may be sent away into the wilderness to Azazel.

Aaron shall present the bull as a sin-offering for himself, and shall make atonement for himself and
for his house; he shall slaughter the bull as a sin-offering for himself. He shall take a censer full of
coals of fire from the altar before the Lord, and two handfuls of crushed sweet incense, and he
shall bring it inside the curtain and put the incense on the fire before the Lord, so that the cloud of
the incense may cover the mercy-seat that is upon the covenant, or he will die. He shall take some
of the blood of the bull, and sprinkle it with his finger on the front of the mercy-seat, and before
the mercy-seat he shall sprinkle the blood with his finger seven times.

He shall slaughter the goat of the sin-offering that is for the people and bring its blood inside the
curtain, and do with its blood as he did with the blood of the bull, sprinkling it upon the
mercy-seat and before the mercy-seat. Thus he shall make atonement for the sanctuary, because of
the uncleannesses of the people of Israel, and because of their transgressions, all their sins; and so
he shall do for the tent of meeting, which remains with them in the midst of their uncleannesses.
No one shall be in the tent of meeting from the time he enters to make atonement in the sanctuary
until he comes out and has made atonement for himself and for his house and for all the assembly
of Israel. Then he shall go out to the altar that is before the Lord and make atonement on its
behalf, and shall take some of the blood of the bull and of the blood of the goat, and put it on each
of the horns of the altar. He shall sprinkle some of the blood on it with his finger seven times, and
cleanse it and hallow it from the uncleannesses of the people of Israel.

When he has finished atoning for the holy place and the tent of meeting and the altar, he shall
present the live goat. Then Aaron shall lay both his hands on the head of the live goat, and confess
over it all the iniquities of the people of Israel, and all their transgressions, all their sins, putting
them on the head of the goat, and sending it away into the wilderness by means of someone
designated for the task. The goat shall bear on itself all their iniquities to a barren region; and the
goat shall be set free in the wilderness.

Then Aaron shall enter the tent of meeting, and shall take off the linen vestments that he put on
when he went into the holy place, and shall leave them there. He shall bathe his body in water in a
holy place, and put on his vestments; then he shall come out and offer his burnt-offering and the
burnt-offering of the people, making atonement for himself and for the people.

HYMN 
Words: (c) Marnie Barrell, 1999
Tune: Kingsfold
<a
href="http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/barrell/mb10.html">http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/barrell/
mb10.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.

Relentless lover, God in Christ
who died to set us free,
unswerving as your love for us
may our commitment be:
to come and learn what courage means,
and take the challenge up
to walk with Christ through death to life,
to drink his bitter cup.

And when we come, may that fierce love
be tasted, touched and known,
as we who gather round the Cross
meet in Christ's death our own.
God grant we shall not fear to drink
his cup, the blood he shed,
nor let our hands, unwounded, shrink
from taking up his bread.

So let the Spirit draw us near
to find, in hope and trust,
his broken body risen here,
his life renewed in us.
Life given, life renewed again
in thousandfold increase;
he lives, and sends us out to be
his living gift of peace.

SECOND READING [Luke 23:1-25]:

Then the assembly rose as a body and brought Jesus before Pilate. They began to accuse him,
saying, 'We found this man perverting our nation, forbidding us to pay taxes to the emperor, and
saying that he himself is the Messiah, a king.' Then Pilate asked him, 'Are you the king of the
Jews?' He answered, 'You say so.' Then Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowds, 'I find no
basis for an accusation against this man.' But they were insistent and said, 'He stirs up the people
by teaching throughout all Judea, from Galilee where he began even to this place.'

When Pilate heard this, he asked whether the man was a Galilean. And when he learned that he
was under Herod's jurisdiction, he sent him off to Herod, who was himself in Jerusalem at that
time. When Herod saw Jesus, he was very glad, for he had been wanting to see him for a long
time, because he had heard about him and was hoping to see him perform some sign. He
questioned him at some length, but Jesus gave him no answer. The chief priests and the scribes
stood by, vehemently accusing him. Even Herod with his soldiers treated him with contempt and
mocked him; then he put an elegant robe on him, and sent him back to Pilate. That same day
Herod and Pilate became friends with each other; before this they had been enemies.

Pilate then called together the chief priests, the leaders, and the people, and said to them, 'You
brought me this man as one who was perverting the people; and here I have examined him in your
presence and have not found this man guilty of any of your charges against him. Neither has
Herod, for he sent him back to us. Indeed, he has done nothing to deserve death. I will therefore
have him flogged and release him.'

Then they all shouted out together, 'Away with this fellow! Release Barabbas for us!' (This was a
man who had been put in prison for an insurrection that had taken place in the city, and for
murder.) Pilate, wanting to release Jesus, addressed them again; but they kept shouting, 'Crucify,
crucify him!' A third time he said to them, 'Why, what evil has he done? I have found in him no
ground for the sentence of death; I will therefore have him flogged and then release him.' But they
kept urgently demanding with loud shouts that he should be crucified; and their voices prevailed.
So Pilate gave his verdict that their demand should be granted. He released the man they asked
for, the one who had been put in prison for insurrection and murder, and he handed Jesus over as
they wished. 

The Benedictus (Morning),
the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may
follow.

Prayer:
Lord, you have declared your will
That we should faithfully keep your commandments.

You have commanded us to love one another
As you have loved us.

Lord, in your mercy
Hear our prayer.

Lord, we pray for Christians throughout the world
That we may be one.

We pray for the Roman Catholic Church and Benedict the Pope
That we may be one.

We pray for the Eastern Orthodox churches and for their Patriarchs and Archbishops
That we may be one.

We pray for the Lutheran churches around the world
That we may be one.

We pray for the Methodist churches and their clergy
That we may be one.

We pray for the Presbyterian churches and their ministers
That we may be one.

We pray for the Baptist churches and their leaders
That we may be one.

We pray for all other churches
That we may be one.

We pray for the Anglican Communion
and for Rowan, Archbishop of Canterbury
That we may be one.

We pray for the unity of all Christian people, that the world may believe
That we may be one.

Holy God, 
source of all love, 
on the night of his betrayal 
Jesus gave his disciples a new commandment, 
to love one another as he loved them: 
Write this commandment in our hearts; 
give us the will to serve others 
as he was the servant of all, 
who gave his life and died for us, 
yet is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and forever. Amen.

Standing at the foot of the cross,
we pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Christ Jesus humbled himself for us,
and in obedience accepted death.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer (adapted) are from
_Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_, copyright
(c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses phrases from prayers in
_Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of
England_, material from which is included in this service is copyright
(c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

The invitation to the Lord's Prayer is from _Common Worship:
 Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_, copyright (c) 
The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The collect is from _Book of Common Worship_, (c) 1993
Westminster / John Knox Press.

The hymn is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author; if you
wish to reproduce it further, please apply for permission by sending her an 
email.



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